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Full text of "Microcosm"

SIMMONS COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/microcosm1916simm 



TO 
SUSAN MYRA KINGSBURY 

WHOSE GENEROUS EFFORT HAS INSPIRED US TO 
BROADER AND MORE THOUGHTFUL LINES 

WE DEDICATE THIS BOOK 



Che JYKcroco8m 




Cbe Simmons College Hnnual 

PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS 
OF SIMMONS COLLEGE 
BOSTON : : MASSACHUSETTS 



VOLUME SEVEN 



SIMMONS COLLEGE 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

1916 



GUaaamatea, rpaopra, oear frmtoa all, 
|I?ruse uritlj ktttMy lj?art 
Wut poor attempts at vets? atto proa?, 
(fur paroog of art. 
jForgtnr uiljat aremptlj to you rruto, 
Approor uitjat awmrtlj rlporr, 
SUimmtber only tljat to pkaae 
our atnrm Fttoeauor. 








(college <=>Libi 



ran 



V 




Advertising Section . 

Index to Advertisements 

Athletics . 
Basketball . 
Tennis . 
Track Meet 
Wearers of the "S" 



Calendar . 

Christmas Vespers 

Classes 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 

Class Song 

College Graduates 

Unclassified Students 

Commencement Week 

Corporation . . , 

Faculty and Administrative 
Board . 



Page 

225 

226 

149 
150 
156 

157 
144 

7 
192 

37 
98 

104 

1 1 1 

34 
118 

121 

165 



Page 
Farewell 224 

Former Members of 1916 . 93 

Gaieties 171 

Microchaos . . . . .199 

Miracle Play . . . .191 

Nasson Institute . . .193 

Organizations . . . .125 
Student Government . .127 
Dormitory Student Govern- 
ment 129 

YW.C.A 131 

Dramatic Club . . . . 133 
Endowment Fund . . . 135 

State Clubs 137 

Persimmons . . . . 139 
Microcosm . . . -141 

Athletics 143 

Musical Association . .145 

Prize Song 35 

Silver Bay 196 



HTfflfii^ 



Ian shall follow on nay, 
Units of month ano year ; 

S'ttll shall tljr faithful oial say, 
" Olljr Bitm of all Itfr is Ijm." 

Jffor strung on tltr tljrraits of timr 
®ljr- nays shall Up maor as ant, 

A sorbin thing, or a thing sublimr, 
As tljr nurnnsr within shall run. 



t* 



»T^i 






1915 


Entrance examinations 


Sept. 11-18 


Condition examinations 


Sept. 16-18 


Registration 


Sept. 20, 21 


Opening of the College Year 


Sept. 22 


Columbus Day, a holiday 


Oct. 12 


Thanksgiving Recess 


Nov. 25-2,7 


College closes at 12..35 P.M. 


Dec. 21 


Christmas Vacation 


1916 


College opens at 9 a.m. 


Jan. 4 


Mid-year Examinations Begin 


Jan. 27 


End of the first term 


Feb. 5 


Opening of the second term 


Feb. 7 


Washington's Birthday, a 


Feb. 22 


holiday 




College closes at 12.35 p.m. 


March 23 


Spring Vacation 




College opens at 9 a.m. 


April 4 


Patriots' Day, a holiday 


April 19 


Memorial Day, a holiday 


May 30 


Final examinations 


May 29— June 9 


Commencement Day 


June 14 


College Entrance Board exam- 


June 12-17 


inations 




The summer session 


July 3 — Aug. 12 



(Enrjmratiott 



HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., Boston, President. 

ROBERT TREAT PAINE, 2d, A.B., Boston, Treasurer. 

JOHN WASHBURN BARTOL, A.B., M.D., Milton, Clerk. 

FRANCES ROLLINS MORSE, Boston. 

WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.D., Sc.D., Boston. 

JOSEPH BANGS WARNER, A.M., LL.B., Boston. 

MARY MORTON KEHEW, Boston. 

HORATIO APPLETON LAMB, A.B., Milton. 

GEORGE HENRY ELLIS, Newton. 

MARION McGREGOR NOYES, A.M., Newbury. 

GUY LOWELL, A.B., S.B., Brookline. 

MARY ELEANOR WILLIAMS, Brookline. 

ELIZABETH WINSOR PEARSON, A.B., Newton. 

JAMES HARDY ROPES, D.D., Cambridge. 




HENRY LEFAVOUR, President, B.A., 
Williams College, 1883 ; Ph.D., Williams 
College, 1886; LL.D., Williams College, 
1902; Tufts College, 1905; Additional 
course, University of Berlin. 

Formerly : Instructor in Williston Seminary ; Pro 
fessor and Dean, Williams College ; President of Sim 
mons College from 1902. 

Societies : Phi Beta Kappa ; Trustee, Williams Col- 
lege ; Trustee, Boston State Hospital ; Fellow, American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences ; Fellow, American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science ; Colonial So 
ciety of Massachusetts ; Society for the Preservation ot 
New England Antiquities ; New England Historic Gene- 
alogical Society ; American Economic Association ; 
American Sociological Association ; Chairman of Trus- 
tees, Women's Educational and Industrial Union; Ex- 
ecutive Committee, North Bennet Street Industrial 
School ; St. Botolph Club ; Boston City Club ; City Club 
of New York. 




SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, Dean, Pro- 
fessor of the Theory and Practice of Edu- 
cation. A.M., Tufts College. 

Formerly : Principal of Schools, St. Johnsbury, Vt. ; 
Principal of Training School for Teachers, Saratoga, 
N. Y. ; Supervisor of Primary Schools, Minneapolis, 
Minn. ; Supervisor of Schools, Boston, Mass. ; Member 
of Massachusetts State Board of Education, 1910-1915; 
Dean of Simmlons College, from 1902. 

Publications : Waymarks for Teachers; Reading, 
Hoiv to Teach It; Stepping Stones to Literature Scries 
(with C. D. Gilbert) ; The Mother Tongue (with George 
Lyman Kittredge) ; Manual of Composition and Rheto- 
ric ( with George Lyman Kittredge and John Hayes 
Gardiner) ; With Pencil and Pen; See and Say Scries; 
Lessons in Composition (with George Lyman Kit- 
tredge). 

Societies : The Mayflower Club ; Women's City Club ; 
Executive Committee of Women's Education Asso- 
ciation, Boston ; Member of Board of Trustees, Women's 
Educational and Industrial Union; American Home 
Economics Association ; American Sociological Asso- 
ciation. 



10 



(Errijutral (EnurapB 



tPrntsduilJi iErnnnmtrm 

ALICE FRANCES BLOOD, Associate Pro- 
fessor in Household Economics, and 
Director of the Household Economics 
School. B.S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1903; Ph.D., Yale Univer- 
sity, 1 9 10. 

Formerly : Private Assistant to Dr. S. P. Mulliken, 
1903-1904: Instructor in Simmons College. 1904-1908; 
Assistant Professor in Chemistry in Simmons College, 
1910-1914. 

Publications: Some Peculiarities of the Proteolytic 
Activity of Pappain (with L. B. Mendel) ; The Erepsin 
of tlie Cabbage. 

Societies : Sigma XI ; American Chemical Society ; 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae ; Association of the 
Women of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; 
American Home Economics Association. 




SOPHRONIA MARIA ELLIOTT, Assistant Professor of Household 
Economics. M.A., Brown University. 

Formerly: Providence and Boston Public Schools; School of Housekeeping, Boston; 
Simmons College, 1902-. 

Publications: Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning (joint author with Mrs. Ellen H. 
Richards) ; Household Bacteriology ; Household Hygiene. Articles in magazines and papers. 

Societies: Health Education League; Teachers' School of Science; Women of Tech- 
nology Association; New England Home Economics Association; American Home Economics 
Association ; International Congress on School Hygiene. 

ELLA JOSEPHINE SPOONER, Assistant Professor of Domestic Art. 
Graduate of Framingham Normal School; Harvard Summer School, 
1898 and 1913-1914; Simmons College, 1905-1906; Columbia Sum- 
mer School, 1909 and 191 1. 

Formerly : Instructor, Perkins Institution for the Blind ; Private Teaching, Boston Trade 
School for Girls, Andover Guild Evening Classes ; Andover Guild Summer School, 1908 and 
1910. 

Societies: American Home Economics Association: New England Home Economics 
Association ; Eastern Manual Training and Art Teachers' Association ; Society for the Pro- 
motion of Industrial Education; Alumnae Council of Framingham Normal School; National 
Education Association. 



11 



ULA M. DOW, Assistant Professor of Household Economics. B.S., 
Kansas State Agricultural College, 1905 ; M.S., Columbia University, 
1 9 1 3 ; Additional courses at the Framingham Normal School, 1905- 
1906. 

Formerly : Instructor at Kansas State Agricultural College, 1906-1914 ; Head of the 
Department of Domestic Science at Kansas State Agricultural College, 1914; Extension 
work at Kansas Agricultural College and at Cornell University. 

Societies : American Home Economics Association. 

MARIA WILLETT HILLIARD, Lecturer on Cookery. 

Formerly : Principal of Boston Cooking School ; Lecturer on Home Economics. 

ALICE NORTON DIKE, Instructor in Household Economics. B.L., 
Smith College; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; School of 
Housekeeping. 

Formerly : Teacher, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. ; Teacher, School of House- 
keeping, Boston ; Experiments and Recipes in Cookery I, Summons College, 1912. 

AMY M. SACKER, Special Instructor in Interior Decoration. 

Principal of The Amy H. Sacker School of Design for Women. 
Societies : Society of Arts and Crafts ; Copley Society. 

BEULAH CLARK HATCH, Instructor in Household Economics. S.B., 
Simmons College. 

Formerly : Instructor in Domestic Science, Pennsylvania State College. 

ELIOT THWING PUTNAM, Lecturer on Architecture. A.B., Har- 
vard University. 

ABBY JOSEPHINE SPEAR, Special Instructor in Millinery. Special 
Courses, Columbia University, N. Y., Summer Session, 191 1 ; Special 
Courses, Harvard University, Summer Session, 19 13. 

Formerly: Instructor in Millinery at The Garland School of Homemaking, Boston. 
Societies : New England Home Economics Association. 

*MARY BOSWORTH STOCKING, Instructor in Household Economics. 
S.B., Simmons College. 

Formerly : Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111. ; Assistant in Household Economics, Simmons 
College ; Teacher of Domestic Science, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. ; Lectures, Private 
Classes. 

Societies: American Home Economics Association; New England Home Economics 
Association ; Simmons Club of Boston. 

* On leave of absence. 

12 



MARGARET COFFIN, Instructor in Household Economics. A.B., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee; S.B., Columbia University; Psychology and 
History, Summer School of the South. 

Formerly : Instructor at College for Women, Columbia, S. C. ; Assistant, Teachers' Col- 
lege, Columbia University ; Director of Domestic Science, State Normal School, Stevens 
Point, Wis. 

Societies: American Association of Home Economics; American School of Home Eco- 
nomics; Chi Omega; Phi Kappa Phi; Association of Collegiate Alumnae; Teachers' College 
Alumni Association ; Women's Educational and Industrial Union ; Boston Municipal League. 

FRANCES TEN EYCK BOYD, Special Instructor in Institutional Man- 
agement. Course in Institutional Management, Simmons, 1908. 
Formerly : House Superintendent and Bursar at St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. 

ELIZABETH' MAY GOODRICH, Special Instructor in Institutional 
Management, and House Superintendent of the Simmons College' 
Dormitories. 

Formerly : Assistant House Superintendent, Simmons College. 

ELLEN C. WOOD, Instructor in Household Economics. B.S., Simmons, 
191 2. Additional courses at College of Physicians and Surgeons 
at Columbia University, 1914; Harvard Summer School, 1914. 
Taught at Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 

MARY HALEY MORAN, Lecturer on Institutional Management. Busi- 
ness Training and Experience in Stenography, Book-keeping, Office 
Management, and in Settlement and Social Work. 

Director of the New England Kitchen, Women's Educational and Industrial Union. 
Ten years in the employ of the Union ; eight years in the Lunch Department of the New 
England Kitchen. 

Societies : Business Women's Club. 



AMY FACKT, Assistant in Household Economics. 
College, 1903; S.B., Simmons College, 191 2. 



Illinois Woman's 



MARIAN GAGE, Instructor in Household Management. Boston Cook- 
ing School. Physics at Columbia Summer School. 

Formerly : Assistant Dietitian, State Sanitarium, Rutland, Mass. ; Teacher of Cookery, 
Boston Public Schools ; Teacher of Cookery, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. ; Assistant 
in Household Economics, Simmons College. 

Societies: New England Home Economics; National Economics Association. 



13 



EMMA REID SOUTHWORTH, Instructor in Household Economics. 
A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1902. 

Formerly : Offord School, Maiden, Mass., Derby Academy, Hingham, Mass., Technical 
High, Springfield, Mass., Columbia Teachers' College, Summer School. 1914-1915. 

MARGERY HUGHES, Instructor in Sewing. 1 908-1909, Simmons 
College. 

Formerly : 1909-1910, Assistant, Simmons College ; 1910-1912, Instructor at Simmons ; 
1"13-1915, Head of Household Economics Department, Brockton High School, Brockton, 
Mass. 

ETHEL STILZ, Instructor in Sezving. Summer School, Butler College, 
Indianapolis; Domestic Arts Course, Pratt Institute, 1914. 

Formerly : Assistant and Substitute Teacher in the Manual Training High School, 
Indianapolis, Ind. ; Teacher in Marion County, Indiana, for two years ; Vocational sewing, 
Indianapolis. 

KATHARINE LORENZ POWEL, Instructor in Domestic Art. Ph.B., 
University of Chicago, 191 2. 

Formerly: Assistant Instructor. Household Arts, University of Chicago, Summer 1912; 
Instructor, Household Arts. University of Wyoming, 1912-1914; Instructor, University of 
Chicago, Summer 1914. 

MABEL WILKERSON, Assistant in Sewing, Ph.B., University of Ari- 
zona, 1909; University of California Summer School, 1913. 

Formerly : Deputy County Recorder, Pima County, Arizona, 1909-1914 ; Simmons Col- 
lege, 1914-1915. 

MARCIA CURRIER OSGOOD, Assistant in Household Management. 
B.A., Wellesley College; B.S., Simmons College, 191^. 




14 




EDWARD HENRY ELDRIDGE, Profes- 
sor of Secretarial Studies, and Director of 
the School of Secretarial Studies. M.A., 
Temple University, 1903 ; Ph.D., Temple 
University, 1907; Special work in Psy- 
chology at University of Chicago, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, Clark University. 
Two years at Amherst College. 

Formerly : Stenographer in a business house ; Sec- 
retary to President Conwell, Temple University; Pro- 
fessor of Psychology, Temple University ; Director of 
School of Business, Temple University. 

Publications: Hypnotism, Penn Publishing Company, 
1910; Sliortliand Dictation Exercises, American Book 
Comlpany, 1909; Expert Typewriting, co-author with 
Miss Rose L. Fritz, American Book Company, 1912 ; 
Business Speller, American Book Company, 1913. 

Societies: Delta Upsilon; Vice-President, Alumni 
Association of Temple University ; Ex-President of the 
Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association ; Ex-Secre- 
tary of National Shorthand Reporters' Association. 

CHARLES FOREST RITTENHOUSE, Assistant Professor of Secre- 
tarial Studies. Graduate of the Department of Business, Scio 
College, 1902; Zanerian Art College, Ohio; B.C.S., Boston School 
of Commerce and Finance, 19 14. 

Registered as a Certified Public Accountant under the laws of Massachusetts. 

Formerly : Head of the Commercial Department of Northampton Commercial School, 
Northampton, Mass., 1903-1910 ; Instructor in Penmanship in Miss Capen's School for Girls, 
Northampton, for five years; Instructor in the High School of Commerce, Boston, for two 
years. 

Publications: Elements of Accounts, A. D. Maclachlan, 1915. 

Societies : American Economic Association, Eastern Comimercial Teachers' Association, 
New England High School Commercial Teachers' Association. 

GERTRUDE WILLISTON CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Secretarial 
Studies. Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Formerly : Secretary, President National Biscuit Company ; Secretary, Advertising Man- 
ager Review of Reviews; Secretary, Commercial Department, American Book Company. 

Societies : Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association, New England High School Com- 
mercial Teachers' Association. 

ELIZABETH ALLISON STARK, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
B.A., Wellesley College; S.B., Simmons College. 

Formerly : Assistant to Registrar, Wellesley College ; Secretary to President's Secretary, 
Wellesley College. 



15 



BERTHA METCALF EMERSON, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
S.B., Simmons College, 1910. 

Formerly: Assistant to the Editor of the Massachusetts Historical Society; Secretarial 
Assistant in the President's Office at Harvard University. 

HELEN GOLLER, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. B.A., Wellesley 
College; S.B., Simmons College. 

Formerly: Secretarial position in Philadelphia. 

CHARLES FREEMAN ROWLEY, Lecturer on Commercial Law. 
B.A., Harvard University, 1905; LL.B., Harvard University, 1907. 

General Practice. Representative in the Legislature from Brookline. 
Formerly : Assistant in Economics, Harvard University. 

JENNIE BLAKENEY WILKINSON, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
S.B., Simmons College, 1911. 

FLORA McKENZIE JACOBS, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. Sim- 
mons College, 191 1. 

Formerly: Private Secretary, 1911-1914. 

ELSIE CHADBOURNE MILLS, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. S.B., 
Simmons College, 1914. 

HELEN KENDRICK HUNT, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. Ph.B., 
Denison University, 19 10. 

Formerly : Taught in Doane Academy, Granville, Ohio. 
Societies : Phi Beta Kappa, Kappa Zeta. 




'**'■ . 



16 



IGthnu'ii f^rrotn? 



JUNE RICHARDSON DONNELLY, As- 
sociate Professor of Library Science, and 
Director of Library School. B.S., Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, Ohio, 1895 ; B.L.S., 
New York State Library School, 1907. 

Formerly : Cataloguer and Reference Assistant, 
Cincinnati Public Library; Instructor Library Science, 
Simmons; Director of tbe Drexel Institute Library 
Scliool and Librarian of the Drexel Institute ; Teacher 
of Library Economy, Washington Irving High School, 
New York City. 



CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Library Science. B.A., 
Harvard University. 

Librarian, Boston Athenseum ; Chairman of Sub- 
Committee in Art Museum; Educational Work. 

Publications: The Librarian's Canons of Ethics; 
Saskia. the Wife of Rembrandt; The Private Soldier 
under Washington; Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and 
America. Two Chapters in A. L. A. Manual of Library 
Science; Editor, Letters of Hugh Earl Percy and of the 
Athenaeum Centenary. 

Societies: Phi Beta Kappa (honorary) at Harvard; 
President, Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities ; Chairman. Visiting Committee to Library 
Museum of Fine Arts; Chairman, Sub-committee in 
Educational Work at Art Museum ; Member, Visiting 
Committee to Library, Harvard University, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Trustees of Donations for Education in Liberia ; 
Member, Massachusetts Historical Society ; Senior 
Warden, Christ Church, Boston ("The Old North"). 





ABBY L. SARGENT, Lecturer on Cutter Classification. Salem Normal 
School. 

Medford Public Library. 

Formerly : Librarian, Wilmington, N. C. ; Middlesex Mechanics Association, Lowell. 
Societies : American Peace Society ; Appalachian Mountain Club ; Massachusetts Library 
Club; Ameiican Library Association; National Geographic Society. 

ALICE MABEL JORDAN, Special Instructor in Library Science. 
Chief of Children's Department, Boston Public Library. 



17 



CHARLES FRANCIS DORR BELDEN, Lecturer on Public Documents. 
LL.B., Harvard University, 1898. 

Librarian, State Library of Massaclmsetts ; Chairman, Free Library Commission of 
Massachusetts. 

Societies : Member of the Council of the American Library Association ; Vice-President, 
National Association of State Libraries. 

FLORENCE TOLMAN BLUNT, Instructor in Library Science. B.L.S., 
Mount Holyoke College, 1896; B.A., Mount Holyoke College, 
1899; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1903. 

Formerly : Reference Librarian and Classifier, Haverhill Public Library, 1903-1915 ; 
Instructor in Simmons College Summer School, 1910-1915. 

Societies : Sigma Theta Clii ; Member, American Library Association ; Massachusetts 
Library Club. 

MARY ELIZABETH HYDE, Instructor in Library Science. B.A., 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1901 ; Student, New York State 
Library School, 1 902-1 903. 

Formerly : Editorial Assistant, California Academy of Sciences ; Assistant Librarian 
and Assistant Secretary, California Academy of Sciences ; Head Cataloguer, San Francisco 
Public Library. 

WILDA C. STRONG PECK, Special Assistant in Library Science and 
Sociology. Western Reserve University Library School, 1908; Sim- 
mons College, 1911-1912. 

Formerly : First Assistant, Perkins Children's Library ; Alliance Branch Library ; 
Cleveland Public Library ; Cataloguer, Boston Athenaeum Library. 
Societies : Political Science Club, Lynn, Mass. 

ALICE LUCILE HOPKINS, Assistant Librarian. B.A., Smith College, 
1905; S.B., Simmons College, 19 13 ; Graduate, Boston Normal 
School. 

Formerly: Assistant Librarian, Radcliffe College Library, 1908-1911; Assistant Librarian, 
Smith College Library, 1911-1912; Assistant Librarian, Simmons College Library, 1912- 
Societies ; Massachusetts Library Club, Smith Alumme Association. 

ANITA MAE ALLEN, Assistant in Library Science. S.B., Simmons 
College, 19 1 5. 



18 



Aratomir (EourHra 




Srpartntntt of iEiutftHlj 



FRANK EDGAR FARLEY, Professor of 
English. A.B., Harvard University, 
1893; A.M., Harvard University, 1894; 
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1897. 

Formerly : Assistant in English, Harvard University ; 
Assistant in English, Radcliffe College ; Instructor in 
English, Haverford College ; Professor of English, Sy- 
racuse University. 

Publications: Author of Scandinavian Influences in 
the English Romantic Movement, 1903; Joint author 
with George Lyman Kittredge of an Advanced English 
Grammar, 1913; Editor of Milton's Paradise Lost, Books 
I and II. 



MYRA COFFIN HOLBROOK, Assistant Professor in English. A.B., 
Vassar ; M.A., Wesleyan. 

Formerly : Instructor in English, Virginia College, Va. ; Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, 
Mass. 

BERTHA MARION PILLSBURY, Assistant Professor in English. 
B.A., University of Illinois; M.A., Ph.D., Radcliffe College. 

Formerly: Instructor in English, University of Illinois, 1904-1906; Reader in English, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1907-1908. 

Societies : Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa. 

GEORGE BRUCE FRANKLIN, Assistant Professor in English. A.B., 
University of Georgia, 1903; M.A., Harvard University, 191 2; 
Additional courses at Harvard University, 191 2- 191 4. 

Formerly: Teacher of English in Statesboro High School, Georgia, 1903-1907; Adjunct 
Professor of English in Georgia School of Technology, 1908-1912. 

Societies : Phi Beta Kappa, Modern Languages Association of America. 

CHARLOTTE FARRINGTON BABCOCK, Instructor in English. 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Radcliffe College. 

Formerly : Teacher at Miss Carroll's School, Boston ; Teacher at Misses Smith's School, 
Cambridge; Private Tutoring; Assistant in English at Simmons College, 1911-1912. 

Societies: Phi Beta Kappa, Radcliffe Alumna; Association, Radcliffe Union, Modern 
Language Association. 



19 



IDA ALICE SLEEPER, Instructor in English. M.A., Radcliffe College, 
1904. 

LUCIA RUSSELL BRIGGS, Instructor in English. A.B., Radcliffe, 
19095 A.M., Radcliffe, 1912. 

Formerly: Teacher at Miss McClintock's School, Boston, 1909-1911; Theme Reader at 
Simmons, 1909-1910; Assistant in English at Simmons, 1910-1911; Teacher at the Charlton 
School, New York, 1912-1914; Teacher at the Oak Park High School, Oak Park, Illinois. 

MARGUERITE ARNOLD. A.B., Vassar College, 1909. 

Formerly: Teacher of English Composition, The Columbus School for Girls, Columbus, 
Ohio; Student at Columbia University; Assistant English Department, Simmons College, 1916. 




20 



ifpartttttttt of iHniirni Slanguages 



((Srrutatt m\b Knaiaurr ICanguaiica) 

REGINALD RUSDEN GOODELL, Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages and Chair- 
man of the Department of Modern Lan- £ 
guages. B.A., M.A., Bowdoin College. 
Additional courses: Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, The Sorbonne, L' Alliance Fran- 
chise. 

Formerly : Instructor. Bowdoin College ; Instructor, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Publications: Editor of L'Infant Expion and Other 
Stories. 

Societies : Delta Kappa Epsilon ; Phi Kappa Phi ; 
Modern Language Association ; Salon Frangais de Bos- 
ton ; Engineers' Club. 




ERNST HERMANN PAUL GROSSMANN, Assistant Professor of 
German. Berlin Normal College; B.A., Harvard University, 1902. 

Instructor: Harvard University. 

Formerly : Instructor, Simmons College. 

Societies : Bostoner Deutsche Gesellschaft, Deutscher Sprachverein. 

CHARLES MARSHALL UNDERWOOD, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Romance Languages. B.A., Harvard, 1900; M.A., Harvard, 1901 ; 
Ph.D., Harvard, 1905 ; University of Paris; University of Grenoble. 

Formerly : Instructor, Harvard University ; Dartmouth College ; University of Cincin- 
nati; Simmons College; Assistant Professor, Simmons College from 1908. 

EVA LOUISE MARGUERITE MOTTET (Brevet Superieur), 
Instructor in French. M.A., Radcliffe College; College of Mont- 
beliard, France. 
Formerly: Instructor, Wellesley College. 

HANS WOLDO RABE, Instructor in German. B.A., c.L, Harvard 
University; Graduate work at Harvard, 1911, 191 3- 191 6. 

Formerly : Instructor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1907-1908. 
Societies : Harvard Deutsche Verein, Modern Language Association, Sprachverein, Har- 
vard Club. 



21 



MARION EDNA BOWLER, Instructor in Romance Languages. B.A., 
University of Idaho, 1909; M.A., Radcliffe College, 1912; Univer- 
sity of Paris; Guilde Internationale; University Grenoble, France. 

Formerly: Instructor in French, Simmons College, 1905-1908; Head French Teacher, 
Kent Place, Summit, N. J., 1910-1911; Instructor in French, Wellesley College, 1911-1912. 
Societies ; Gamma Phi Beta. 

WINSTON BRYANT STEPHENS, Instructor in German. A.B., Bow- 
doin College, 1910; M.A., Harvard University, 1914. 

Formerly : Master at Holderness School for Boys ; Principal, High School, Jonesford, 
Maine ; Exchange Teacher, Kolberg, Germany ; Assistant Professor of German, Colgate Uni- 
versity. 

Societies : Alpha Delta Phi, Phi Beta Kappa. 




22 



Department of iSftatary 



HARRY MAXWELL VARRELL, Assis- 
tant Professor in History. B.A., Bow- 
doin College, 1897; M.S., 1900; M.A., 
Harvard University, 1909; Ph.D., 191 2. 

Formerly : Instructor in University of New Mexico, 
1897-1898; Instructor in University of Colorado, 1899- 
1901; Brooklyn Latin School, 1901-1902; Pueblo High 
School, 1904-1908; Austin Teaching Fellow, Harvard 
University, 1909-1912. 

Societies : Delta Kappa Epsilon ; Phi Beta Kappa ; 
American Historical Association ; National Geographic 
Societv. 




RALPH VOLNEY HARLOW, Instructor in History. B.A., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1909; M.A., Yale University, 191 1 ; Ph.D., Yale University, 
I9I3- 

Formerly: Mr. Leal's School, Plainfield, N. J„ 1909-1910. 
Societies: Phi Beta Kappa, American Historical Association. 

HAYES BAKER-CROTHERS, Instructor in History. B.A., Monmouth 
College, 1904. 

Formerly : Principal of High School, Ashland, Wis., 1905-1913 ; Assistant in History, 
University of Wisconsin, 1912-1913 ; Bulkley Fellow, Yale University, 1913-1914. 





23 




SppartntPMt of Srmumttrs 



SARA HENRY STITES, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Economics. B.A., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1899; M.A., 1900; Ph.D., 
1904; Student in Economics, Geography 
and Ethnography at the Sorbonne and at 
the College de France, 1 900-1 901 ; Uni- 
versity of Leipzig, 1 901- 1902. 

Formerly : Co-principal of the Wilkes-Barre Insti- 
tute, 1901-1912. 

Publications: Economics of the Iroquois, 1904. 



ESTHER LOUISE LITTLE, Instructor in Economics. B.A., Smith 
College, 1903; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1912; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 19 14; Fellow in Sociology and Eco- 
nomics at the University of Pennsylvania, 191 2- 191 4. 




24 




Sfcpartmntt of §>orioloo.u 

JEFFREY R. BRACKETT, Professor of 
Social Economy and Director of the 
School for Social Workers. B.A., Har- 
vard University, 1883; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1899. 

Formerly : President, Department of Charities of 
Baltimore, Md., 1900-1903 ; President, National Confer- 
ence of Charities and Correction, 1904; Director of 
School for Social Workers, Boston, from 1904. 

Publications : Supervision and Education in Charity. 
1901 ; Occasional articles in "Proceedings of National 
Conferences of Charities." 

Societies : Massachusetts State Board of Charity ; 
Director, Massachusetts Civic League ; Ellis Memorial 
Club ; Boston Associated Charities. 

ZILPHA DREW SMITH, Assistant Professor of Social Economy. 

General Secretary, Associated Charities of Boston, for about twenty-five years. 

Publications: Occasional articles in National Conference of Charities, The Survey, etc. 

Societies: SVjonday Evening Club; Board of Tucherman School; one of the Trustees of 
Esther Hawks Trust (educational) ; now and then Examiner for Civil Service positions 
related to Social Work. 

PRESIDENT LEFAVOUR, Instructor in Sociology. 

LUCILE EAVES, Lecturer on Sociology. A.B., Stanford University, 

1894; Graduate Student and Lecturer in Extension Department, 

Chicago University, 1 898-1 899; M.S., University of California, 

1909; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1910. 

Formerly : Head of History Department, San Diego High School, Dan Diego, California, 
1894-1898; Instructor in History, Stanford University, 18994901; Head Worker, San Fran- 
cisco Settlement Association, 1901-1905 ; Director of Industrial Bureau, San Francisco Relief, 
1906-1907; Fellow in Economics; Member of the Summer Session Faculty and Lecturer in 
Economics at the University of California ; Associate Professor of Practical Sociology, 
University of Nebraska. 

Publications: A History of California Labor Legislation, with Introductory Sketch of 
the San Francisco Labor Movement, Vol. II of University of California Publications in 
Economics; Women and Children Wage-Earners, in Report of California Labor Bureau; 
Numerous newspaper and encyclopedia articles. 

Societies : American Sociological Society ; American Economics Association ; American 
Association for Labor Legislation ; National Child Labor Committee, Phi Beta Kappa, Asso- 
ciation of Collegiate Alumnae. 

Irpartmntt of ^ayrljology 

HAROLD ERNEST BURTT, Special Instructor in Psychology. A.B., 
Dartmouth College, 191 1; A.M., Harvard, 1 9 13 ; Ph.D., Harvard, 
1915. 

Formerly: Instructor in Mathematics at Mount Hermon Boys' School, 1911-1912. 

Publications : Factors Which Influence the Arousal of the Primary Visual Memory 
Image; The Effect of Uniform and Non-uniform Lighting on Attention and Reaction Times, 
with Especial Reference to Street Illumination; A Study of the Behavior of the White Rat 
by the Multiple Choice Method. 

Societies : Phi Beta Kappa. 

25 



Separtment of iEuitrattmt 

SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, Dean of the College, and Professor of the 
Theory and Practice of Education. 

ERNEST CARROLL MOORE, Lecturer on the History of Education. 
LL.B., Normal University, 1894; M.A., Columbia University, 1896; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1898. 

Formerly: Instructor in Philosophy, 1897-1901; Instructor in Education, 1902-1906; Dean 
of the Summer Session, 1905-1907, University of California; Superintendent of Schools in 
Los Angeles, 1906-1910; Professor of Education, Yale University, 1910-1914; Investigated 
Schools, East Orange, N. J., 1911-1912; Professor of Education, Harvard University, 1913. 

Publications: How New York City Administers Its Schools. 

CASSIE LUCRETIA PAINE, Instructor in Salesmanship. B.S., 
Teachers' College, Columbia University, 19 12. 

Lecturer in Pedagogy, Applied Psychology, and Textiles. 

Formerly: Teacher in Public Schools of Massachusetts and New York; Model Teacher 
in Practice School, Salem, Mass. ; Supervisor of Practice Teaching, State Normal School, 
Salem, Mass. 

Publications: An article on Arithmetic, Elementary School Teacher, April. 1913; an 
article on the Origin and Growth of the Movement to Train Teachers of Salesmanship, 
published in Manual Training and Vocational Education. 

ANTOINETTE ROOF, Instructor in Education and Director of the 

School of Industrial Teaching. Director of Practice, Women's 

Educational and Industrial Union. Graduate of Framingham Nor- 
mal School. 

Formerly : Teacher in Grammar Schools in Pennsylvania ; Waltham, Mass. ; Newton, 
Mass. ; Instructor in Royal Normal College for the Blind, London ; Principal of Practice 
Department and Supervisor of Practice in State Normal School, Framingham, Mass. 

MARIE GUSTAVA LUNDBERG, Instructor in Education. Framing- 
ham Normal School; One year special course at Simmons College; 
Summer course at the University of Vermont; Summer course at 
Cornell University. 

Formerly : Grade work in the Public Schools of Northampton, New Bedford, and 
Waltham. 

LUCINDA WYMAN PRINCE, Lecturer on Salesmanship and Director 
of the School of Salesmanship. 

Women's Educational and Industrial Union. 



HARRIET A. NIEL, Instructor 
Teacher. 



Education. Kindergarten Training 



26 




tlrimrtmntt of Utology 

CURTIS MORRISON HILLIARD, As- 
sistant Professor of Biology and Public 
Health. B.A., Dartmouth College, 
1909; Additional courses at Institute of 
Technology, 1909-19 10. 

Formerly : Instructor, College of the City of New 
York, 1911-1912; Assistant Professor of Biology, Pur- 
due University, 1912-1914. 

Societies : Gamma Alpha, Sigma XI, American 
Public Health Association, American Bacteriologists, 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
Massachusetts Board of Health Association. 



EDITH ARTHUR BECKLER, Special Insrtuctor in Municipal Labora- 
tory Methods. B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Bacteriologist, Massachusetts Department of Health. 

JANE BOIT PATTEN, Special Instructor in Botany and Horticulture. 
B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1906; Additional 
courses at Technische Hochschule, Dresden, Germany; Course at 
the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole; Course at the 
Botanical Garden and Experiment Station, Dresden, Germany. 

RUTH BRYANT, Instructor in Biology. S.B., Simmons, 1909. 

MARGERY BOYLSTON, Instructor in Biology. S.B., Simmons Col- 
lege, 1908. 

Formerly : Assistant in Biology, Simmons College, 1908-1909. 
Instructor Packer Institute, Brooklyn, 1909-1910. 

CAROLINE MAUDE HOLT, Instructor in Biology. B.A., Wellesley. 
Graduate work at Harvard. M.A., Columbia. Two years grad- 
uate work at University of Pennsylvania. 
Formerly : Instructor in Biology, Wellesley College. 

ELIZABETH FAITH GENUNG, Instructor in Biology. B.S., Cornell 
University, 191 1; M.S.A., Cornell University, 1 914. 
Formerly : Instructor at Cornell University and Iowa State Teachers' College. 

MILDRED ANGIE DAVIS, Special Assistant in Biology. S.B., Sim- 
mons College, 1915. 



27 




Irpartmpnt of phyatrH 

LESLIE LYLE CAMPBELL, Associate 
Professor of Physics. M.A., Ph.D., 
Washington and Lee University; M.A., 
Harvard University. 

Formerly : Assistant in Mathematics, Washington 
and Lee University ; Assistant in Physics, Harvard Uni- 
versity ; Professor in Physics, Westminster. 

Publications : Thomson Effect, Hall Effect, Nernst 
Effect, Ledue Effect, Ettingsliausen Effect in Soft Iron, 
Thermo-Electric Heterogeneity in Alloys, etc.; Disin- 
tegration of the Aluminium Cathode, in the Philosoph- 
ical Magazine, September, 1914. 

Societies : Fellow, American Association for Ad- 
vancement of Science ; American Physical Society ; 
Eastern Association of Physics Teachers ; Mathematical 
and Physical Club ; National Geographical Society ; 
Congo Reform Association ; Phi Beta Kappa. 




GEORGE PRESTON BACON, Assistant 
Professor of Physics and Mathematics; 
M.A., Dartmouth College; Graduate 
work at the University of Michigan and 
the University of Berlin. 

Formerly : Instructor in Science, Peekskill Military 
Academy ; Assistant Principal. Beloit College Academy ; 
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Beloit College ; 
Professor of Physics, University of Wooster. 

Societies : Theta Delta Chi ; Phi Beta Kappa ; Ameri- 
can Physical Society ; American Astronomical and As- 
trophysical Society, 



LAURA KATHERINE JOHNSON, Instructor in Physics. B.A., Cor- 
nell University. Additional courses at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 
Societies : Phi Beta Kappa. 

MARGUERITE DOROTHEA TSCHALER, Instructor in Physics. 
B.A., Boston University, 1911; M.A., Boston University, 1913. 

Formerly : Cambridge Evening Schools. 

Societies : Epsilon Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa, Gamma Gamma Delta, Massachusetts 
Society for the University Education of Women. 



28 




Dtpartmntt of (Eiirmtatni 



KENNETH LAMARTINE MARK, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Chemistry, and Director 
of the School of General Science. A.B., 
Harvard, 1898; A.M., Harvard, 1900; 
Ph.D., Harvard, 1903. 

Formerly: Assistant in Chemistry, Harvard Univer- 
sity; Instructor in Chemistry, Simmons College, 1904- 
1906: Assistant Professor, Simmons College, 1906-1914. 

Publications: Thermal Expansion of Gases. 

Societies: Delta Upsilon; American Chemical Society. 



ALICE FRANCIS BLOOD, Associate Professor of Household Economics. 

GORHAM WALLER HARRIS, Assistant Professor in Chemistry. 
A.B., 1907; A.M., 1909; Ph.D., February, 191 5, (all) Harvard 
University. 

Formerly : Teacher of Latin, Greek and Geometry, Medford High School, Medford, 
Mass.. 1907-1908 ; Assistant and Teaching Fellow in Chemistry at Harvard University, 1908- 
1910: Instructor in Chemistry at Simmons College, 1910-13, Assistant Professor from 1914. 

Societies: Phi Beta Kappa (Harvard), American Chemical Society, American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science, Association of Harvard Chemists, Intercollegiate 
Socialist Society, various reform organizations. 

BESSIE MARION BROWN, Instructor in Organic Chemistry. S.B., 

Simmons College, 1907; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1 9 1 3. 

Formerly: Instructor in Chemistry, Simmons College, 1907-1911. 
Societies: American Chemistry Society. 

FLORENCE CELIA SARGENT, Instructor in Chemistry. S.B., Sim- 
mons College, 191 1. 
Formerly : Research Assistant at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

LESLIE BRIGGS COOMBS, Instructor in Chemistry. B.A., Harvard 
University, 1909; M.S., Harvard University, 1911. 

Formerly: Head Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry, Harvard University, 1909-1911; Re- 
search work in the Wolcott Gibbs Laboratory, Harvard University. 

Publications: A New Method of Measuring the Pressure of Corrosive Gases at Constant 
Volume (with Dr. G. S. Forbes) ; The Surface Tension of Water, Methyl, Ethyl and Isobutyl 
Alcohol, Ethyl Butyrate, Benzine and Toluene (with Prof. T. W. Richards). 

Societies : Alpha Phi Sigma, American Chemical Society. 

EARLE OVANDO WHITTIER, Instructor in Chemistry. B.S., 191 1, 

University of Maine; M.S., 19 13, University of Maine. 

Formerly: Instructor in Chemistry, University of Maine, 1911-1915. 

Societies : Phi Kappa Phi, Tau Beta Pi, Alpha Chi Sigma, American Chemical Society. 

29 



HARRIET ISABELLE COLE, Instructor in Chemistry. B.A., Middle- 
bury College, 1906; M.A., Radcliffe College, 1911; Graduate work 
at Yale, 1913-1914. 

Formerly: Instructor in Science, Hopkins Academy, Hadley, Mass., 1906-1908; Abing- 
ton High School, Abington, Mass., 1908-1910; Wellesley College", 1910-1913. 

Publications: Use of Telluric Acid in Estimation of Bromine Associated with Chlorine 
in Haloid Salts, in the Zeitschrift fiir Anorganische Chemie, vol. 86, and in the American 
Journal of Science, vol. 217 ; The Estimation of Iodine and Bromine in Haloid Salts by 
Means of Telluric Acid, in the American Journal of Science, September, 1914. 

ADELINE MASON WARE, Instructor in Chemistry. S.B., Simmons 

College, 1909. 

Formerly: Instructor in Chemistry, Woodstock, Conn.; Private Assistant to Dr. F. J. 
Moore, Massachusetts Institute, of Technology. 

GERTRUDE FAY BAKER, Assistant in Chemistry. S.B., Simmons 
College, 1914. 



ippartment of 3'mt Arts 

BLANCHE LEONARD MORSE, Instructor in Decoration and Design. 
B.A., Smith College, 1892. 

Interior Decorator. 

Assistant at the Amy H. Sacker School of Decorative Design. 

FRANCIS MELBOURNE GREENE, Lecturer on the Appreciation and 

History of Art, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. B.L., University of 

California, 1892; Ph.D., Berlin, 1908. 

The Appreciation of Art, twenty lectures ; The History of Art, thirty lectures. 
Formerly: University Extension Lecturer, University of California, 1901. 
Publications: In the course of completion: The Work of Art, a System of Aesthetic 
Appreciation. 

JANET RITCHIE, Special Assistant in Decoration and Design. Amy 
H. Sacker School of Design. 



S?»artntrat of P^yatral tUratntnu, 

FLORENCE SOPHRONIA DIALL, Assistant Professor of Physical 
Training. Graduate of Sargent Normal School of Physical Educa- 
tion; Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory; De Pauw Uni- 
versity. 

Formerly: Physical Director, Y.W.C.A., Terre Haute, Ind., Instructor, Vassar College. 
Societies : American Physical Education Association, Kappa Alpha Theta. 

30 



(^ffirfrs of Anmtmatrattmt 

HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, A.M., Dean 

EVELYN WALKER, A.B., Registrar 

LYSSON GORDON, A.B., Bursar 

MARTORIE BURBANK, A.B., Recorder 

GERTRUDE JANE BURNETT, S.B., Secretary to the President 

ALICE IRENE MANDELL, Ph.B., Secretary to the Dean 

MARGARET MUNRO GRIMSHAW, A.B., S.B., Assistant Registrar 

GRACE BARBER LEONARD, Cashier 

MARJORY CORWIN, Secretary to the Director of the School of House- 
hold Economies. 

ALICE CATHERINE McMANAMA, Assistant to the Registrar 

MABEL ADDISON SPEAR, S.B., Assistant to the Recorder 

HELEN MARGARET CLARK, A.B., S.B., Secretary to the Director of 
the School of Library Science 

LEAH CLARK, Assistant to the Registrar 

MARGARET SIMS, S.B., Assistant to the Bursar 




31 




SENIORS 



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To our Alma Mater, and to our sisters all 

Striving ever onward where life to them may call, 

May we offer gladly of service and of aid, 

To make our college worthy of the homage we have paid 

In the years before us thy name shall ever be 
Symbol of high honor kept pure for love of thee. 
Loyal as thy daughters we pledge thee to enfold 
Within our hearts the spirit of the hallowed blue and gold. 

.54 



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1 91 6 we'll loyal be O see on high our banner waves 

We'll cheer you on to victor}'. Our pathway to success it paves 

There's none with us who can compete For '16 now with all your might, 

We'll rise above defeat We'll cheer you through the fight 

Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Give all your hearts and hands to win Oh raise the standard, lift it high, 

When 19 1 6 does begin. It's 1916 that we cry. 

Simmons forever, time cannot sever Simmons forever, time cannot sever 

1916 from you. I9 l6 from you. 

35 



CElaBB of 191H 




©ffirera 

Katherine M. Leonard 

President 

ISABELLE B. HuRLBUTT MARTHA A. WHITING 

Vice-President Secretary 

Blanche Woodward 

Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 
Eva A. Jacobi Georgia L. Sawyer 

Mary E. Rogers Emily G. Webb 

Class Color: Yellow 




37 




Alice F. Blood 

"You are bus}', Miss Blood," the Senior remarked, 

As she stood 23rd in the line ; 

And yet you've incessantly smiled as you've said : 
"Three E's are a very bad sign." 

"You are slim, oh Miss Blood, and exceedingly neat, 
But, nevertheless, we all rue it; 
Amidst all this chemistry, cooking, and heat, 
Pray, how do you manage to do it?" 

"I have learned," said Miss Blood, "the secret of that, 
On a well-balanced diet you'll never grow fat ; 
And wear a new blouse every day in the week — 
That is the one way true neatness to seek." 

"You are busy, Miss Blood, as we've mentioned before, 
Yet you're always exceedingly wise, 
Pray tell us, as we stand in line at your door, 
Are your answers all facts — no surmise?" 

"I am wise," said Miss Blood, withholding permission 

To substitute History for Cooking, 
"You'd better be sure to make up your condition, 

If for a job you're seriously looking." 




Henry Lefavour 

A loyal classmate staunch and true, our president. 
Yet views askance whate'er bids new of precedent 
Or what of precedent does savour 
Meets not with president's LeFavour. 
'Twixt president and precedent the difference amasses. 
The president is he who smiles benignly o'er his glasses, 
But he joined 1916 and to her his interest lent, 
And thus he did establish a most valued precedent. 



38 



Charles M. UndSrwood 

A jollier man has never been seen 
Than this curly-haired member of 1916! 
He's always good-natured, ready to aid 
Any puzzled, struggling, Simmons maid. 

In the corridors we hear many a rumour 

Of his bubbling, God-given sense of humour. 

He knows a lot; he's clever and witty, 

He's the same to us all, bright, homely, or pretty. 

Popular? Goodness, that's his middle name! 
Who's there in this world could find us to blame ? 
And we certainly are most heartily glad 
We have got one classmate who never gets mad. 

Dr. Underwood, your praises are e'er in our mouth, 
And we'll never forget you, go we East, West, or South. 




Sarah H. Stites 

A dainty figure, smartly dight, 
Trips down the hall with footfall light, 
And yet with pretty show of haste 
That bids us ask: "Can she be late, — 
This fair classmate!" 

Her wit, her charm, her chic attire, 
The brilliant mind we all admire — 
This member dear, how is she hight, 
Whose every trait her class delights? . 
Exactly ! Stites ! 




39 




Ada E. Alexander 

"She that is fair, though never vain or proud, 
More fond of home than fashion's changing crowd, 
Whose taste refined even female friends admire, 
Dressed not for show, but robed in neat attire." 

But this fair lady is not all perfection. Her dissi- 
pations are two — Tea and Facul-T. To read her en- 
gagement calendar gives no hint that Simmons claims 
many of her busy hours. But when we do see you, 
Ada, we find much for which to be thankful. Your 
hospitable open door on first floor and the sweet pene- 
trating strains of your eukalale will not soon be for- 
gotten. 

College Park Academy. 
San Jose, California. 
Household Economics. 




Margaret Alexander 

There are two things which most of us know well 
about Margaret — she sits in the front row of every 
class and she takes "Long Sewing.'' A few of us are 
fortunate enough to know that she has other very ad- 
mirable characteristics. 

Practical Arts High School. 
44 Falcon Street, Boston, Mass. 
Household Economics. 




r 






Olive Allison 

"Absence but serves as a lamp whereby we may see our 
friends more clearly." 

Nevertheless, Olive, we should greatly have preferred 
to have you with us all of this last year — for seeing you 
more clearly has but served to make us realize our loss 
more keenly. 

Girls' High School. 

35 St. Botolph Street, Boston, Mass. 

I lousehold Economics. 



40 



Lillian M. Anderson 

"Lill" "Bobby" "Andy" 
"The mildest manners and the gentlest heart." 

Lillian is so quiet that few know her best traits. 
She is conscientious and interested in her studies. Still 
there is a lot of fun hidden behind her modest manner, 
and she enjoys a good time as much as anyone. More- 
over she always sees the best in everyone. 

Practical Arts High School. 

7 Greenhrier Street. Dorchester, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Dorothy Austin 

"Dot" 

Deeming nothing unworthy of thought 

Her mind all agog with ideas ; 

Fact with fancy is wonderfully fraught 

Yet revealed but to privileged ears. 

Tho' of gentle, affectionate ways 

A firmness is present as well ; 

And of her methodical phase, 

Who is there who hasn't heard tell ? 

Dana Hall. 

137 Grove Street, Wellesley, Mass. 
Secretarial. 

Chairman Dormitory Vespers Committee (4), Glee Club (3, 4), 
Choir (3, 4), Endowment Fund Committee (3). 

Frances B. Banks 

"Fran" "Franny" 
"To have friends one must be a friend." 

She's English and she does take life rather seriously 
at times, but who wouldn't with so much responsi- 
bility? She has tried a little bit of everything at col- 
lege, but in spite of that she didn't get the vote for 
"the most versatile." She went out for hockey this 
fall to gain class spirit and to lose — weight. "Fran" 
has rather decided opinions on some things — platonic 
friendships, diets, and the war. 

Melrose High School. 

Barrington Passage, Nova Scotia, Can. 

Household Economics. 

Class President (2). President Student Government (4), 
Treasurer Student Government Council (2), Y.W.C.A. 
Cabinet (3). Senior Prom Usher (3), Junior Prom Usher 
(2), Delegate to Intercollegiate Conference at Cleveland 
(4), Hockey (4), Chairman Welcoming Committee (3). 

41 





h m 




Olive Barnicoat 

"Coats" 

"The trust I have is in mine innocence ; and therefore 
am I bold and resolute." 

To see Olive's little figure tripping around, one 
would hardly think of her as bold or resolute, but such 
a spirit is concealed beneath her youthful mien that one 
can say she is afraid of no man. 

Quincy High School. 

213 Washington Street, Quincy, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Dorothy G. Bell 

"Dot" "D" 

"I take part, I see, and hear the whole." 

There's little that escapes Dorothy's keen eye or 
willing hand, whether it be in work or play. 

East Boston High School. 

17 Appleton Street, Watertown, Mass. 

Library. 

Hockey (4), Basketball (4). 




Irma L. Berry 

"I trust I have not wasted breath." 

Irma says so little — we often wonder how very much 
she must be thinking. 

Maiden High School. 

27 Maplewood Street, Maiden, Mass. ' 

Household Economics. 



42 



G. Elizabeth Bouve* 

"Betty" 

Betty, she can make a waist, 
And also things you love to taste, 
Everything from A to Z, 
Does our Betty, and she's wee. 
"None knew her but to love her, 
None named her but to praise." 

Brookline High School. 

158 Harvard Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Class Secretary (3), Microcosm Board (4), Persimmons 

Board (3, 4), Tennis Manager, Junior Prom Usher (2), 

Senior Prom Usher (3). 



r 




Mildred Bouve 

"Mil" "Boove" 

"Whate'er she did was done with so much ease ; 
In her alone 'twas natural to please." 

We have missed Mildred from many social evening 
gatherings this year, and we hear she is always writing. 
Some say she is writing a book on "The Use of Rolling 
Pins in Breadmaking," and others say — well, why 
bother about what they say, as long as we all know she 
has a very 7 good excuse. 

Newton High School. 

46 Plymouth Road, Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Library. 

President Dormitory Government Association (4). Microcosm 
Board, Tennis Champion (2, 3, 4), Delegate to Silver Bay, 
Usher at Senior Prom (3), Class Treasurer (3), Delegate 
to Student Government Conference. 

Evelyn Brewster 

"Banty" 

Banty is one of the little ones of the class. Owing to 
her size she has difficulty in covering the ground as 
swiftly as some, but Simmons has done wonders for 
her. We can now sa5' — "I see you are early of late, 
you used to be behind before, but now you are first, at 
last." Banty is a good sport and always enjoys a joke. 

Abbot Academv. 
Wolfboro, N. H. 
Secretarial. 





43 




Marguerite C. Burnes 

"Midge" "Peggy" 

"Come storm or shine to me, all days are fair " 

, Marguerite is one of the quietest and withal one of 
the sweetest. Her unfailing pleasantness and ready 
smile have made us all her friends. We expect, Mar- 
guerite, that you will not long be bothered with the 
trials of a secretarial position, but will forsake them 
for a "home of your own." And when that time 
comes, don't think you can forget us, because you can't. 
We're all coming to visit. 

Chelsea High School. 

2 Burnett Street, Woburn, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Margaret Burns 

"Marg" 

"A friend in need is a friend indeed, 
Is a saying true, all right," 
Quoth Margaret Burns, and we all took heed, 
"For all that Burns is bright." 

Arlington High School. 

39 Brantwood Road, Arlington. 

Household Economics. 




Dorothy A. Chapin 

"Dot" 

Quick to laugh at your joke with you, 
Ready to do what you want to do, 
Blessed with a temper whose unclouded ray, 
Can make tomorrow bright as today. 



Somerville High School. 
11 Mystic Street, Somervil 
Household Economics. 



Mass. 



44 




Bertha E. Clark 

"Bert" 

"Beauty's ensign yet is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks" 

Bertha can ride a motorcycle and run a "flivver," 
yet every time she goes to Marshfield she takes a train. 
Just the fact that there are neither motorcycles nor 
"flivvers" hovering around Pilgrim Road might ac- 
count for her taking the train, though it is considered 
a great mystery. We take this chance to ask, whose 
motorcycle, whose "flivver," and why Marshfield? 

With a keen sense of humor and a small appetite, 
Bertha was known to say that "Pass the butter" was 
technically a suggestion in that "Pass the butter" 
might remind someone to pass the bread too. 

St. Joseph's Academy, Deering, Maine. 
43 Cedar Street, Portland, Maine. 
Household Economics. 
Dormitory Council (4). 



Louise V. Clary 

Quiet, modest, unassuming, 

As a little flower blooming. 

We'd scarce know what you are like 

Were it not that, like the flower, 

The sun does daily show your power, 

When it shines on you in Psych. 

Westfield High School. 

32 Sprague Street, Maiden, Mass. 

Library. 





Gertrude B. Clemence 

"Tr-.tdic" 
"Love always makes those eloquent that have it." 

If anybody ever asks you in just what point you can 
especially recommend Gertrude, why tell him there is 
one thing you are absolutely sure Gertrude knows, and 
that is "the capital of Mississippi." Ask her — she 
won't mind. 

Southbridge High School. 
Southbridge, Mass. 
Secretarial. 

Advertising Business Manager of Microcosm (4), Senior 
Prom Usher (3). 




45 




Madeline Cleveland 

"Mad" 

"O who will walk a mile with me along life's merry way?" 

Madeline is one of the best cures for the blues that 
we know of. She is always ready to see the best side 
of things, if there is one. In fact, if it weren't for 
her opinion of teaching settlement classes, we should 
think she was affected with chronic optimism. 

Houlton High School. 
87 Court Street, Houlton, Maine. 
Household Economics. 

Chairman Junior-Freshman Party (3), Chairman Hallowe'en 
Party (4), Senior Prom Usher (3). 




Ella M. Coats 

"Gentle in manner, firm in reality." 

Such a gentle, dainty maiden is she that to know 
her is to love her. But for all her quiet manner she 
has decided ideas and good common sense. 

Cooperstown High School. 
Cooperstown, N. Y. 
Library. 




Marguerite E. Coker 

"Peeev" 

"There was a little girl 
And she had a little curl 
And it hung right down her forehead. 
When she was good 
She was very, very good 

The rest of this jingle could never possibly apply to 
Marguerite, because Marguerite could never be horrid. 
She's quiet, sweet, unassuming and pleasant — in fact, 
one of the best of us. 

Somerville High School. 

66 Flint Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Secretarial. 



46 



Eileen A. Colonna 

"Colonna" "Pesty" 

Dear were her charms to me, 
Dearer her laughter free, 
Dearest her constancy, 
"Eileen Aroon." 

Briefly and honestly — all right clear through. 

Central High School. 

140 B Street, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

Secretarial. 

Glee Club (1, 2, 3). 




Hazel M. Cornish 

"H. M." "Has" "Wildrose" 

"Then twenty thousand Cornish-men will know the reason 

why." 

It's unfortunate that Hazel's college career couldn't 
have been postponed a few 5'ears. Perhaps in the new 
dormitories each room will have its individual tele- 
phone. When she's not telephoning she's writing let- 
ters — or reading them — and she receives callers only in 
spare moments. "Wildrose" has a faculty for making 
friends, and for keeping them. She has one very warm 
friend. 

Bowdoinham High School. 
Bowdoinham, Maine. 
Household Economics. 

President Maine Club (4), Treasurer Dramatic Club (4), 
Usher at Senior Prom (3), Track Walk (3). 




Helen Cosgrove 

"Here, here will I remain." 

As to her aunt, "In some circumstances to die is to 
live," but in some cases it's wise to keep probability in 
view. Helen studies, and sews, late at night, and de- 
lights in early morning walks. Her conscientiousness 
makes her seem almost prudish at times, but it's impos- 
sible not to like her. Sometimes she wishes Worcester 
people didn't haunt even 7 nook and cranny of Boston. 

Classical High School. 

Schussler Road, Worcester, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




L 



47 




Helen M. Cowin 

"Bobbie" 
"Good company in a journey makes the way to seem shorter." 

Helen came to us this year from Western Reserve 
and we are glad that Simmons attracted her. She has 
faithfully helped to guide the Freshmen of her house 
in the straight and narrow path. 

Central High School. 

9338 Pratt Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Secretarial. 




Elsie B. Cruttenden 

"C nit tie" 

Our Elsie's a regular shark 

Who always gets A for a mark. 

It may seem absurd, 

But I'm sure that I've heard 

She can catalogue books in the dark. 



West Hartford High School. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Library. 




Ruth Cummings 

Ruth is one of the greatest travelers in our class. 
She is president of the Travelers' Mutual Aid Society 
and can give information regarding routes between 
Boston, Back Bay, and Providence. Her latest publi- 
cation is "Travel as an Educative Process" — a text- 
book for all classes pursuing a course in Education. 



English High School. 

222 Sumter Street, Providence, 

Household Economics. 



R. I. 



48 



Mary H. Cunningham 

"Cutie" 
Mary had a little curl, 
Its sheen was like pure gold, 
And though she's had it many years, 
That curl, it still is gold. 

She wore it to school one day, 
(It was not against the rule). 
The students and instructors smiled 
To see that curl in skule. 

Cambridge Latin School. 

19 Brown Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

General Science. 

Track (2). 

Margaret S. Currier 

"Marg" "Peg" 
"I would more natures were like thine." 
"Marg" is the only person who doesn't agree with us 
there, but she is no judge. The thing that makes us 
feel that way is the fact that she is always sincere. She 
says just what she means and for that reason couldn't 
qualify for the "most tactful" in the class, but we'd 
rather have her as she is. If you see someone coming 
down the corridor hidden by a pile of boxes and 
bundles, you'll be sure to find M. Currier behind them 
all. She's not trying to hide — nor bury herself in her 
work, but is merely going to "sewing." Marg con- 
siders that sewing is good for her because she really 
needs the discipline. "Who'd a thot" Marg was a 
spoiled child ? 

Robinson Seminary. 

East Kingston, N. H. 

Household Economics. 

Editor-in-Chief Microcosm (4), Vice-President New Hamp- 
shire Club (1). Glee Club (3, 4), Choir (3, 4), Senior 
Prom Usher (3). 

Gertrude W. Curtis 

"Dot" 
She's a girl who is bright, 
And a girl who's well liked ; 
And a girl who's a mighty good dancer. 
She the girl whose new pen has gone from 

her sight ; 
Just find it for her, if you can, sir! 

Cambridge Latin School. 

75 Magazine Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

49 










m* 




Edna F. Drake 

"Ned'' "Drakie" 
"Her modesty's a candle to her merit." 
All of us who know Edna like to recall the quiet but 
sincere interest and sympathy that is so characteristic of her. 
Surely we might all learn a lesson in real diligence from Edna. 
Sharon High School. 
Sharon, Mass. 
Secretarial. 

Rachel R. Drinker 

"Rae" 
"She doeth little kindnesses 
Which most leave undone or despise." 

Rachel spends most of her time doing things for 
other people, and we wonder how she finds time to do 
them for herself. The only answer is — her room-mate looks 
after her things in spite of the fact that Rae says she is 
"boss." We wonder if she considers Ellie as part of her 
training in institutional management. 

Quincy Mansion School. 

201 Mellwood Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Household Economics. 

Vice-President S.A.A. (3), President Pennsylvania State Club 
(4), Secretary and Treasurer Pennsylvania State Club (3), 
Usher at Senior Prom (3), Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4). 

Julia Edwards 

"Judie" 
"See your guests approach, 
Address yourself to entertain them sprightly, 
And let's be red with mirth." 

Tell us, Judie, how do you do it? We, who can 
with difficulty stammer a few unheeded remarks about 
the weather, or the identity of the ice cream, yearn to 
know how you keep a whole table of admiring sopho- 
mores hanging on your every word. And tell us how you 
found the magic combination — a technical education com- 
bined with all the arts and graces commonly acquired in 
a Young Ladies' Finishing School. For while we are 
painfully grinding one verse of Alma Mater, you can, 
with ease and gestures, trill selections from all the operas. 
And then the old gems we all love so dearly — who could 
forget, "Over the banister leans a face." And how, 
"Judie," can you keep up with all the local scandal and 
still not neglect the Cosmopolitan or the latest styles in 
our spectacles and rings? Just to see you knit is in- 
spiration enough. But why go on?— the truth remains thai 
you excel! in so many ways, that all we can say is: "Praj 
how do you manage to do it" J " 

Fonda High School. Rogers Hall Seminary. 

Fonda, New Ynrk. 

Household Economics. 

Household Econoniiics Toast ai Sophomore Luncheon. 

50 



Alta J. Emerson 
"A. J." 

Thrilled by projects wild and gay, 
This is Alta so they say. 
Full of whims and wanton wiles 
Down to Durgin Park she files. 
If in bed till lunch she's lain 
This we know is Alta Jane. 

Delving deep in Ed-u-ca-tion, 
Precise in enunciation. 
"Well-groomed" on her job begun 
This is A. J. Emerson. 




Wellsville High School. 
Wellsville, N. Y. 
Household Economics. 



Gladys M. Emerson 

"Glad" 

Can you be a good student without being a grind ? 
It certainly can be done by taking a little pains. Gladys 
has accomplished this to a fine point. The pains are 
spent in taking notes — the rest just naturally follows 
after. These same notes are a marvel of system and 
neatness like all the things she does. 

Proctor Academy. 
Andover, N. H. 
Household Economics. 




Helen M. Fagg 

"Helle" 

Helen joined 1916 after having spent one and a half 
years at the University of Minnesota. As our most 
promising Senior, she already proves the truth of her 
vote by being able to spend so many hours in the Art 
Museum, at Boston University, and at the same time 
edit our Persimmons so successfully. 

West High School. 

2609 Hennepin Avenue. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Secretarial. 

Editor Persimmons (4), Associate Editor Persimmons (3), 
Dramatic Club Committee (4), Junior Prom Usher (2). 




51 





Edna Leontine Feldenthal 

"Leo" 



"Never 

A deed ungentle, or a word unkind." 

We are all familiar with Leontine's bright face and 
busy ways. She has been growing of late into a true 
secretarial star, one of the very cleverest of us all. 
Keep that bright face, Leontine ; it has made many 
long days brighter for us, and will do so for others. 

Girls' High School. 

4 Asylum Street, Boston, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Mary Edna Field 

"Peggy" 

"She was not inclined to labor 
For herself or for her neighbor 
For she dearly loved her ease." 

Mary is one of our poetesses. It is to her that we 
are indebted for our class song. It is thru her that 
Persimmons achieved some of its popularity last year. 
Mary is very bright but she is not by any means what 
might be called a hard worker. Truly she loves her 
ease. And, too, she has other interests beside her work 
and a daily budget to attend to. 

Amherst High School. 
Leverett, Mass. 
Secretarial. 




Marion Fish 

"Fishie" 

"And I hold ambition of so airy and light a quality 
that it is but a shadow's shadow." 

Marion firmly believes in a "liberal education," both 
in college and outside of it. 

Somerville Latin School. 

16 Fosket Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Secretarial. 



52 



J. Opal Fisher 

"Jo" 

"Thou lacks't not Friendship's spellword, nor the half- 
unconscious power to draw 
All hearts to thine by love's sweet law." 

Opal certainly has a faculty for making friends, but 
we sometimes wonder how she can keep them. When 
you are invited to her room for tea you never know 
whether she will be there or not. Most hostesses 
would be there, but Jo believes in being original, and 
so lends excitement and suspense to her entertain- 
ments and disappoints her guests now and then, — only 
to give them a better time at her next party. 

Buffalo Seminary. 

583 West Delavan Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Household Economics. 

Choir (1, 2), Glee Club (1), Endowment Fund Chairman (4), 

Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (4), Senior Prom Usher (3), Class 

Treasurer (1). 

Lucile C. Fisher 

"Fish" "Kezvp" 

"Yes," Miss L. C. Fisher said, looking up from her 
tatting, "of course I prefer to teach English, but I am 
also interested in Philanthropy. If there are any 
problems along that line that you would care to have 
me discuss I should feel more than capable of doing so. 
However, before I accept any position, I must consult 
a certain person whose advice is always to be depended 
upon." 

Boonton High School. 
223 Cornelia Street, Boonton, N. J. 
Household Economics. 

President New Jersey Club (3), Treasurer New Jersey Club 
(2). 

Marion L. Flavell 

"Mam" 

"Gifted with a natural instinct to discern what knowledge 
can perform and a diligence to learn." 

Marion is another traveler and we are certainly 
glad that she traveled our way. 

Marshfield High School. 
Marshfield, Mass. 
Household Economics. 





53 




Grace M. Fogarty 

"Gracious" 

"So mild, so merciful, so good, 
So patient, peaceful, loyal, loving, pure." 

She is little, I know, and not easily seen, 
But look in 305, 6, or 16. 

Practical Arts High School. 

1 Pickering Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

Household Economics. 





Leone M. Foote 

"Leany" 

"Leany" is a bit more than the name implies. We 
know you can argue "Leany,' and you can scarcely 
realize how often you have concealed the ignorance of 
your classmates by stimulating that impulse in an in- 
structor to talk an hour. 

Wheaton Seminary. 

Mount Morris, N. Y. 

Household Economics. 

Cheer Leader (3), Mandolin (2, 3). 



Ellen Foster 

"Foster" 
"For there's no place like home." 

It didn't take Ellen long to learn the truth of this 
old adage, and it has been her motto since the begin- 
ning of her college career. She almost left us once to 
go out to Ann Arbor to specialize in Biology, but for 
some unknown reason she decided not to go. Later we 
discovered she had another specialty — in Pawtucket. 
Michigan was a little too far away, wasn't it, Ellen ? 

N.B. — Ellen has bangs now! 

Central Falls High School. 
40 Hawes Street, Central Falls, R. I. 
Household Economics. 

Class Secretary (1), Mouse Chairman (4), Usher at Junior 
Prom (2). 



54 



Helen B. Foster 

"Foster" 

"How happy could I be with either,. 

Were t'other dear charmer away?" 

Helen is always so cheerful and jolly and she has so 
many friends, of both sexes, it is hard to claim any of 
her time for your own. In spite of her social engage- 
ments she manages to find a good deal of time to spend 
in studying the ethical questions of life as dealt with 
in the courses of Ed. 



Lynn Classical High School. 
269 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, 
Household Economics. 
Junior Prom L'sher (2). 



Ma 



Estelle L. Freeman 

"Stelle" 

Application blanks have no terrors for "Stelle." 
Her future rests not upon such things, and we wonder 
at the persistency with which she pursued cataloguing 
and reference work even after the advent of the solitaire 
— that blighter of so many college careers. 

Needham High School. 

Cor. Oak and Chestnut Streets, Needham), Mass. 
Library- 
Leader Mandolin Club (4), Glee Club, Choir and Mandolin 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4). 




Mary M. Giblin 

"Gibby" 

Capable? Well, I should say so! She will make a 
marvel of a housekeeper when she gets a chance. But 
beware, Mary, of allowing your humor to become 
barbed. Like the arrow of old it may "fall to earth, 
you know not where," and spoil everything. 

Practical Arts High School. 

37 Mayfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

Household Economics. 







"2a 






* 


M^^v > 




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ti-vf 




■HE' 


M 


r* 


>5 





55 




Helen P. Giere 

"Vene" 

Tall and stately, but not serene. 
What can it be, we ask ourselves, 
That makes the girl forever worried ? 

Mount Vernon High School. 
330 North Fulton Avenue, Mount Vernon, N. Y. 
Library. 

Dormitory Council (4), Secretary New York State Club, 
Choir (1), Junior Prom Usher (2). 



..._.j 




Dorothy Gilman 

"Dot" 

Dorothy is clever, with a mind full of brilliant ideas. 
She has a faculty of saying exactly the thing we think 
but know no way to express. Her sense of humor is 
very highly developed — she can see the funny thing 
however deeply hidden. Besides this, Dorothy's a 
cynic. That deep-running vein of cynicism in her 
make-up colors her view of the world. Perhaps that's 
the reason that Dorothy scares us a bit. 

Tilton Academy. 

Tilton, N. H. 

Secretarial. 

Quarterly Reporter (3). 




Madeline P. Grant 

A dillar, a dollar, 
A very bright scholar, 
Why do you come so soon 
If classes start at nine o'clock. 
Why do you come at noon ? 

Dorchester High School. 

12 Florida Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

General Science. 

Executive Board (3), Track (2, 3). 



56 



Alice T. Gray 

"A l" 

"Books ! 'Tis a dull and endless strife !" 

When one is young and beautiful, why must one 
study all the days? 

Revere High School. 

131 Oregon Street, Jefferson Hall, Lynn, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Rena Grey 

Rena has red o'range of things in a voice which can 
yell low. Therefore she is not green, nor have we 
seen her ever blue, or vi o'let any of her friends. Rena 
is simply Grey. 

Arlington High School. 
59 Pleasant Street, Arlington. 
Household Economics. 
Mandolin Club (4). 




Alice H. Haley 

"A woman convinced against her will is of the same 
opinion still." 

So long as Alice follows her will there is none better 
to work, to plan, and to carry out all she attempts suc- 
cessfully. Our education has been broadened by the 
Current Events Class — the result of Alice's persistent 
work. 

Beaver High School. 

Beaver, Pa. 

Household Economics. 

President Pennsylvania Club (4), Microcosm Board (3). 




57 






Ruth Hammond 

"Mammy" 

And here is a girl 

With her mind in a whirl 

As she madly tears for her train. 

Her tho'ts are so blue, 

Now her pen is lost, too, 

We hope she hangs on to her brain. 

She has "oceans to do" 

For herself and you too. 

But — if you'd break up this mood 

I will give you a tip, 

Let fall from your lip 

This simple, four-lettered word — FOOD. 
Newton High School. 
30 Walker Street, Newtonville, Mass. 
Household Economics. 

Mandolin Club (2, 3, 4), Choir (2, 3, 4), Class Delegate Silver 
Bay, Track, Baseball (1, 2, 3), Hockey (4). 

Mabel E. Hartford 

"Yon Mabel hath a lean and hungry look." 

If Mabel had been short and fat and looked like a 
cup of blanc mange instead of like a string of macaroni, 
her photo would have appeared in this book under the 
title "Good-natured." If she were reading the last 
installment of "The Twin Sisters" (we're not saying 
she does read it), and you asked for the magazine for 
five minutes, she'd hand it over without a groan, and 
finish when you returned it a week later. In fact, 
Mabel's whole vital experience gives one the impression 
of being strung out, and promises well for a ripe old age. 

Patridge Academy. 
Duxbury, Mass. 
Household Economics. 

Esther Hawkes 

"Biffy" 
Esther started out four years ago to make herself 
well-known ; she has succeeded admirably. She would 
do anything for anybody who was in a tight place; the 
fact that she furnished five men for Prom last year, 
amply bears witness to that fact. They were all 
grateful ! 

Girls' Latin School. 

15 Denham Street, Boston, Mass. 

I lousehold Economics. 

Choir (3, 4), Glee Club (3, 4), Track ( 1, 2. 3), Basketball (2). 



58 



ESTELLE E. HAWLEY 
"Stelle" "Hazvley" 

Now, Estelle, it's perfectly all right to be neat, and 
we like to see you practice Miss Stocking's ideal teach- 
ing, but "have a heart." Let a poor soul walk on your 
clean rug, blot on your fresh blotter, and put her 
head on your new wall paper. To go from the prac- 
tical to the sublime, Estelle is one of the little wan- 
derers through the Art Museum. The long black 
string about her neck leads to a pair of glasses. This 
string is for a purpose, not to lend dignity to this 
remarkable person. 

Pittsford High School. 
Pittsford. N. Y. 
Household Economics. 




Marion W. Hayward 

There is a young maid so poetic ; 

She always is most energetic ; 

She makes many a hit, 

With her excellent wit, 

But her meter is really pathetic. 



Oliver Ames High School. 
North Easton, Mass. 
Library. 




Margaret G. Heimer 
"Peggy" 

If good nature is a necessary quality in the library 
world, "Peggy" ought to have her pick of positions. 
Her dry wit is delicious, but never malicious, and is 
guaranteed to keep all those about her in a good humor 
also. 

Unadilla High School. 
Unadilla, N. Y. 
Library. 




59 




Marjorie M. Heseltine 

If you want to know "Ps)'ch," ask Marjorie. If you 
want to know Emerson, ask Marjorie. In fact, when 
in doubt — ask Marjorie. But, girls, if you want to 
make a dress, go elsewhere. 

Motto. — Do it now and do it well. 

Deering High School. 

65 Sherman Street, Portland, Maine. 

Household Economics. 




Marion Hills 

"Hillsy" 

Sober and earnest did someone say? But of course 
she didn't mean Marion, because Marion is never 
sober, although she manages to compose her features 
and appear in earnest. But it is easy to "call her 
bluff." We have one objection to her — she grinds. 

Natick High School. 
South Natick, Mass. 
Household Economics. 
Senior Prom Usher (3). ' 




Ruth E. Hills 

" I would help others out of a fellow feeling.'' 

There never was a girl with so warm a heart, with 
such ready sympathy, so unselfish and unassuming as 
our Ruth. Her hands and mind are always busy, yet 
she is ever ready to stop and give a word of sympathy 
and a bit of help when needed. We think, Ruth, that 
these splendid qualities would shine particularly in 
parish work, don't you? 

Mollis High School. 

Mollis, N. H. 
Household Economics. 



60 



Katherine Hobart 

"K" 

Kay, the daughter of Ohio, 

She of calm, collected bearing, 

Self sufficiency her motto, 

Finds her interest in suffrage. 

"If the men vote, why not women? 

Forward, sisters, to the ballot!" 

Hathaway Brown School. 

1923 E 71st Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Household Economics. 

Ohio Club President (4). 




Ruth F. Howe 

"Rufus" 

"Here sang the lips elated." 

If we were as sure of our "nightingale's" heart as we 
are of her vocal chords, we'd prophesy a career. She 
dances and skates as well as she sings, and is most 
entertaining, which is a very poor pun. 

Cambridge Latin School. 

7 Exeter Park, Cambridge, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Class Vice-President (1), Executive Board (2), Chairman Pin 
and Ring Committee (2), Chairman House Party Commit- 
tee (3), Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Choir (1, 2, 3, 4). 




Elsie M. Howlett 

"Else" 

"So careful of the type she seems 
So careless of the single life." 

Else combines the two cardinal virtues of a good 
steno, — speed and accuracy. Her accuracy is unfail- 
ing; if you doubt her speed ask her to describe New 
Year's Eve in New York City. She has a complete 
line of jokes, too. Mah ! Mah ! 

Cambridge Latin School. 

12 Whittier Street, Cambridge. Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Mandolin Club (1, 2, 3, 4). 




61 




Florence P. Hubbard 



"Hide" 

"And still the wonder grew. 
That one small head could carry al 



she knew.' 



Lest you misinterpret this, let us explain that Flor- 
ence carries the intellectual points in her head and lets 
the dry jokes slip out. 

Concord High School. 

70 Sudbury Road, Concord, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Marjorie E. Hulsizer 

"Schlitz" 

"Her face, which is always serene, possesses a mysterious 

and powerful attraction ; sad hearts come to it as to 

the sun to warm themselves again." 

"Even," describes Marjorie. She is always the 
same — calm, self-contained, and capable. 

Reading Academy. 

76 Mine Street, Flemington, N. J. 

Household Economics. 



Ellen H. Humphrey 

"Humf" 

"I wonder what I'll be at fifty, 
Should nature keep me alive. 
When I find that life's so bitter, 
When I'm hut twenty-five." 

Ellen has intentions of becoming a nurse after she 
is graduated from Simmons. We know she'll make 
a good one, but we don't think that she'll be one very 
long. She'll do the same thing that the "White 
Linen Nurse" did, because she is one of the most dig- 
nified and best-looking seniors in the class. 

Fairhaven High School. 

Rochester, Mas^. 

1 [ousehold Economics. 

House Chairman (3), Senior Prom Usher (3). 



62 



ISABELLE B. HURLBUTT 

To Hurlbutt a jest at her gestures superb 

Which express more than words how she feels, 

Might on her original quirks put a curb 

No matter how strong our appeals. 

For they're all subcutaneous, extemporaneous, simply 
spontaneous 

Means, to foretell 

That in work or in fun 

Or whate'er's to be done 

She Isabelle. 
Miss Lewis' School. 
104 West 84th Street, New York City. 
Library. 
Class Vice-President (4), Executive Board (3), Assistant 

Editor of Persimmons (4), Toastmistress Sophomore 

Luncheon (2). 

Gertrude Htjssey 

"G" 
For valuable statistics look below. Tho' we haven't 
room in the book to tell the whole story we might say 
briefly that "G" is a wonder. She stands for the best in 
college and also for the unusual. She does everything well 
— especially cooking, riding hand cars, and bicycles. She's 
a bit late but she gets there. Where? Everywhere! She 
has an extremely fascinating smile and a persuasive and 
rmuscular way of bringing you face to face with your duty. 
She leads the mob. She adores instructing the young and 
innocent, but has about decided to run a "hot-dog'' lunch on 
Boston Common for her life work, or serve Baking Powder 
Biscuits per the hundred to the starving soldiers. She's 
our hero ! 

Capen School. 

274 Hamilton Street, Albany, N. Y. 

Household Economics. 

Class President (3), President Y.W.C.A. (4), Executive 
Board (2), Treasurer S.A.A. (2), Treasurer Y.W.C.A. 
(2), Y.W.C.A. Cabinet, Persimmons Board (4), Cheer 
Leader (.1. 4), Vice-President and Treasurer Women's 
Intercollesiate Student Government Association (3), Glee 
Club (2, 3, 4), Choir (2, 3, 4), Mandolin Club (1, 2), 
Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), Track (1, 2, 3, 4), Baseball (2). 

Helen G. Husted 

"Hucn" 
A flash of wit, a depth of silence, 
A happy laugh, a helpful hand, 
A merry whistle, a deep, deep gloom, 
A pleasant drawl, — I guess that's all, 
Fancy that! 
Brookline High School. 
99 Electric Avenue, Somerville, Mass. 
General Science. 

63 










Mildred G. Hutchins 

"Smile and the world smiles with you. Kick and you kick 
alone ; 
For the cheerful smile will let you in where the kicker 
is never known." 

Mildred will surely not be in those ranks next year. 
No — it's not to be married that she leaves, but to be a 
"dietitian." 

Randolph High School. 
Randolph, Vt. 
Household Economics. 





Eva A. Jacobi 

With hundreds of A's and a B or two 

She's come thru her college course. 

Was her feminine intuition 

The only guiding force? 

In the Simmons College Dramatic Club 

She gained the greatest power 

'Cause she'd managed the exits and entrances 

In the lunchroom's busiest hour. 

Girls' Latin School. 

207 Lakeview Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

General Science. 

President Dramatic Club (4), Executive Board (2). 



Elizabeth P. Jacobs 

"Beth" 

"Dreaming, dreaming, 'tis all that I have to do." 

Beth comes to us from her long sojourns in the 
land of dreams long enough to eat and go to classes. 
But one day, so the story goes, during mid-year exam- 
inations, she forgot when her exam came, and waked 
up from dreaming after it was all over. Be sure you 
are awake, Beth, when the "all important question" 
comes, for it would be indeed sad to wake up too late 
for that! 

Utica High School. 

1()21 Oneida Street, Utica. N. Y. 

Library. 

V.W.C.A. Cabinet (4), Glee Club ( 1, 2, 3), Choir (1, 2, 3). 



64 



Dora Jacobson 

"When a friend you need she's a friend indeed." 

Dora is one of that clever group of science girls of 
which our class is so proud, but long ago, before she had 
delved so deeply into chemistry, she came very near 
blighting her career and blowing up the college. We 
feel very confident that such mistakes are impossible 
now. 

East Boston High School. 

17 George Street, Chelsea, Mass. 

General Science. 




Mae A. E. Jouvette 

"Jouvie" 

"Jouvie" is one of our cleverest. She has done many 
things and all of them well. We believe that her won- 
derful rendering of the song entitled "Romeo and Ju- 
liet" is deserving of public recognition. Moreover, we 
feel sure that unless she embraces the earliest oppor- 
tunity to enter upon an operatic career she will have 
missed her calling. And yet, we ask, "Oh, Jouvie, 
wherefore your interest in newspaper work?" 

New Bedford High School 

370 W. Middle Street, New Bedford, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Frances E. Keegan 

"Fran" "Kecg" 
"I say just what I think and nothing more or less." 

Good reader, let me now introduce to you, in the 
character of our class baby — Miss Frances Keegan, of 
the tender age of 19 years. She is really a very bright 
baby for her age, and has begun to sit up and take 
notice. Frances, did Junior Prom and consequences 
help in this "taking notice" process? 

West Newbury High School. 

West Newbury, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Business Manager Microcosm (4), Business Manager Per- 
simmons (3), Dormitory Council (4), Quarterly Board 
(3, 4), Choir (1, 2, 3, 4), Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Mandolin 
Club (1, 2, 3), Usher at Senior Prom (3). 

65 







Kathleen S. Keirstead 

"Kath" 
"Tho' I condescend 
Sometimes to call a minister my friend!" 

In June, 1916, when the Senior Secretarials take 
their straight head-dive into the pool of big business, 
"K" will come up in the position of a preacher's secre- 
tary with tracts in her right hand and daily food in her 
left. "K" has started her career of Service to Man 
by organizing the Matrimonial Protective Agency, to 
furnish recommendations from a girl's roommate to 
her prospective husband. Thus she hopes to stimulate 
and cheer up one's lord of creation as he woefully enters 
the marriage relation. 

Lynn Classical High School. 
40 Arlington Street, Lynn, Mass. 
Secretarial. 

Chairman Weekly Calendar Committee (4), Vesper Com- 
mittee (4), Usher at Senior Prom (3), Choir (3). 

Mary C. Kelly 

"Kelly" 
"Rolled to larboard, rolled to starboard." 
The Information Bureau. Honorary Member of 
the Klu Klutch Klan. Kelly's from Portsmouth, and, 
worse luck, proud of the fact. We hear she refused a 
good enough solitaire this summer because it wasn't 
aquamarine. Quite a risk. It's a question as to 
whether her fame will be made through her sewing 
or because of her research work in Biology. We like 
her. A good lecturer but — she giggles ! 
Portsmouth High School. 
217 Cabot Street, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Household Economics. 
Secretary and Treasurer New Hampshire Club (2), Choir (1). 

C. Gertrude Knight 

"Knightic" 
"They talk about a woman's sphere as though it had a limit; 
There's not a place in Earth or Heaven, 
There's not a task to mankind given, 
There's not a blessing or a woe, 
There's not a whispered yes or no. 
There's not a life, a death, or birth, 
That has a feather's weight of worth — 
Without a woman in it." 

Is there, Gertrude? So we should worry, in spite 
of our youth, as to which niche in the Social Service 
corner we fit, shouldn't we? 
Cambridge School for Girls. 
697 Cambridge Street, Brighton, Mi". 
School for Social Workers. 

66 



Beulah A. Knowles 

"Bule" 

With wit to charm and voice to sing, 
With fingers ever on the wing, 
With feet so fleet and ways so neat, 
What more can mortal ask of fate? 

Rogers High School, Newport, Mass. 

Jamestown, R. I. 

Secretarial. 

Chairman Dramatic Committee (4), Secretary and Treasurer 

of Glee Club (3), Choir and Glee Club (1, 2, 3), Cheer 

Leader (1). 



Julia A. Leamy 

"Julie" 

"Julie" is one of the few mortals who desire to carry 
all the work offered by the college. One finds that it 
can't be done. She also labors under the illusion that 
she never knows anything. Were it so she wouldn't 
be here. Aside from this, she enjoys a good time and 
doesn't fail to have it. 

Troy Conference Academy. 

Fair Haven, Vt. 

Household Economics. 

Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Manager (4), Junior Prom Usher (2). 





Katharine M. Leonard 

"Kay" "Kate" 

We expressed our opinion about Kay when we elected 
her to represent good old 1916 in our Senior year. 
However, there are a few things we might add. She is 
tactful, rides a bicycle, has a roommate, carries her 
handkerchief wadded into a tight roll, and she rises 
well to occasions, though not to breakfast. We heard 
something in Psych about popularity and handwriting 
going hand in hand. Not so with Kay! She is cer- 
tainly the exception to this rule ! 

Buffalo Seminary- 

166 Beard Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Household Economics. 

Class President (4), Class Treasurer (2), Vice-President 

New Y'ork Club (3), Mandolin Club (2, 3, 4), Junior Prom 

Usher (2), Senior Prom Usher (3). 




67 






Hazel O. Littlefield 

"Hasch" 

Hazel is a veritable New Englander, the possessor 
of what is known in these parts as a "Puritan con- 
science." Enough said! Duty is spelt with a capital 
D. Her short course in sewing almost ruined her un- 
usual disposition. Hazel came to us "all for study," 
with no thought of the personal. "Behold, what man- 
ner of change is here!" She has entered the ranks of 
the vain. Her latest whim is taking a mirror to chapel 
to look at the back of her hat. But for all this she is a 
staunch, loyal friend. 

Portland High School. 
52 Main Street, Florence, Mass. 
Household Economics. 

Treasurer Maine Club, Executive Board (3), Dormitory 
Council (4). 



Anna Luddy 

"Few things are impossible to diligence and skill." 

We envy Anna for two things — her splendid mind 
and the wave in her hair. She thinks before she speaks, 
and thinks well. She is truly fastidious and always 
sedate. 

Lynn Classical High School. 

136 Maple Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Household Economics. 



Jessie H. Ludgate 

"J. H. L." 

Young Jessie came out of the West. 

Of all the girls out there, 
Jess Ludgate's the best. 

Jessie came from Beaver, Pa., to become a Simmons- 
bred librarian. Like the rest of us, she has toiled for 
four long years, and now, presto! she's the full-fledged 
finished article. With her sympathy and her kindness 
to everyone, Jessie will be town librarian in a month 
and state librarian in two months. Then, at our re- 
union two years hence, she will be our greatest howling 
success. 

Beaver High School. 

381 E. Second Street, Heaver. Pa. 

Library. 



68 



Alice L. McCarthy 



Here's a girl of old New England 
Who is steadfast, staunch, and true. 
She is just the one to help you 
When a lesson is hard to do. 
And though she's always worried 
About her standing in the class, 
We only smile, because we know 
She is alwa5's sure to pass. 

Oliver Ames High School. 

Main Street, North Easton, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Helen McDougall 

To look at her you would think she was big enougli 
to speak up for herself, but not at all. She is the most 
timid of creatures when it comes to speaking up. Still 
it is a great deal to be a good listener and good looking 
at the same time. Helen sews well and is very fond 
of doughnuts. 



Plattsburg High School. 

92 Brinkerhoff Street, Plattsburg 

Household Economics. 



N. Y. 




Margaret E. McGrath 

"Beck" 

"ISly life is one dem'd horrid grind." 

Beck could get more pleasure out of her life if she 
only would. You could hardly accuse her of having a 
mind of her own but she has a competent adviser in Miss 
Cosgrove. Her motto: "When in doubt, telephone." 
She's obliging enough to have a brother and he's oblig- 
ing enough to be obliging whenever a dance is on. 
Beck's a perfect specimen of a good-natured red-head. 

Fitchburg High School. 

26 Cedar Street, Fitchburg, Mass. 




69 




Fay Mack 

All those who know Fay judge her a friend worth 
while. 

Mason City High School. 
Iowa State College. 
Ames, Iowa. 
Household Economics. 




Elsie A. Mahar 

"Ellie" "Babe'" 

Ellie has a lot of plants she got in Botany, 

They're growing fast and yet demand a lot of thought 

and care. 
Each night to keep them from the cold, 
They're clustered in the hall; 
We like to see them there; they lend a most aesthetic 

air. 

Drew Seminary. 

Quaker Street, Schenectady Co., N. Y. 

Household Economics. 

Endowment Fund Committee (4), Senior Prom Usher (3). 




Helen E. Martin 

"Honey" 

Our choice Vermont "Honey," guaranteed by Bos- 
ton's most reliable "Delicatessen." Honey is the proud 
possessor of the unusual — she has three hands: a right 
hand, a left hand, and a little behind hand. 

Rutland High School. 
60 Church Street, Rutland, Vt. 
Household Economics. 

President Vermont Club (4), Secretary and Treasurer Ver- 
mont Club (3). 



70 



Jean E. Masson 

"Vex not the Muse with idle prayers. 
She will not hear thy call. 
She steals upon thee unawares 
Or seeks thee not at all." 

We all wish we knew the secret of Jean's talent, but 
we cannot all have it, and so quietly she does her w-ork 
that the Microcosm blossoms before we know it. 

Microcosm Board Art Editor (4), Microcosm Board (3), 
Dormitory Council (4), Choir and Glee Club (2, 3, 4), 
Secretary Y.W.C.A. (3), Prom Usher (2), Honor Commit- 
tee (2, 3, 4), Executive Board (2), Membership Committee 
Y.W.C.A. (2). 

Gertrude M. Miller 

"Budge" 

"You come late — yet you come." 

Ever on the mornings dreary, while we ponder weak 
and weary 

Over word-signs, hooks, and circles in a room upon 
first floor, 

As we plunge with desperation into volumes of dicta- 
tion, 

Suddenly a strange commotion's heard far down the 
corridor ; 

'Tis a step approaching closer, ever closer to the door. 

Soft the handle turns, — who enters, ask you ? 

'Tis our Gertrude, nothing more ! 

Chelsea High School. 

149 Hawthorne Street, Chelsea, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Alice H. Mitchell 

"Mitch" 

If you're waking, call me early, 
Call me early, mother dear ; 
Former habits must be altered 
For the duties of this year. 
Diet kitchens, lunchroom duties, 
Classes in the South End drear, 
Call for early morning rising 
And an understanding clear. 

Auburn High School. 
Weedsport, N. Y. 
Household Economics. 
Mandolin Club (3). 









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71 




Mildred M. Moore 

"Miggy" 

There is a young girl from the West 
With whom we are greatly impressed ; 
We know she's a star 
Tho' she comes from afar. 
She'll shine in the Faculty Test. 



Stockton High School. 
Stockton, 111. 
Secretarial. 




Clara L. Mdnger 

"Munger" 

Munger is the patron of the pot, who presides over 
the bacon and our fate — adviser of our deeds and our 
clothes. She wears bone glasses and knits fast and 
furiously. 

Catskill High School. 
Catskill, N. Y. 
Household Economics. 




Anna R. Nagle 

"Kewpee" 

"Laugh and grow fat." 

Anna is trying to benefit from her course in Dietetics, 
where she learned that to grow thin one should work 
hard and so use up one's energy. But I'm afraid she 
won't succeed very well, for although she is always 
busy she is always giggling. ( See quotation for this 
thought expressed in poetry. ) 

Concord High School. 
South Acton, Mass. 
Household Economics. 



72 



Mary A. Nimms 

"X immsic" 

The poetry of motion for "Nimmsie" means skating, 
and we do not wonder at her fondness for the sport 
when we see her skill in it. If the weather spoils this 
pastime, however, you may be sure that she will still 
find consolation in her other hobby, music ; for she 
agrees with Shakespeare in his contempt for the man 
who hath no music in his soul. 

Albany High School. 

132 Central Avenue, Albany, N. Y. 

Library. 




K. Eileen O'Kane 

"Eil" 

Oh, Eileen O'Kane 

Is a maid quite sane, 

Who doesn't fret or worry ; 

She does her work, 

Without a shirk, 

And seldom's in a hurry. 

Xewton High School. 

31 Lee Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Rachel R. Phelan 

"Rac" 

"Sweetly flows 
The liquefaction of her clothes." 

Rachel has tried hard for four years to set us a really 
gcod example as regards neatness. She may, it is true, 
have criticized us rather harshly at times ; but after all 
we feel, with that insight common to Seniors, that we 
really owe her something for the good example and 
attempt to show us ourselves "as others see us." 

Girls' Latin School. 

66 High Street, Medford, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




73 






Blanche C. Philbrick 

She's a very quiet, unassuming little girl, — this girl 
from the Old Granite State. In fact, we wish she were 
more self-confident, for then we might all know her 
better. And Blanche is surely a girl worth knowing 
and claiming for a friend. Her four years in college 
have been busy ones; if you don't believe this, you should 
follow her through a day; then you'll be willing to 
admit that a partnership in a cooperative home-keeping 
experiment and a heavy hour plan mean busy days. But 
Blanche likes to be busy for it's then that she forgets 
herself most completely. Taken all in all, she's O.K. 
and one of the truest, staunchest of friends. 

Pembroke Academy. 

Epsom, New Hampshire. 

Household Economics. 

Choir (4). 

Grace P. Phillips 

"Philpsie" 

She lives in Pete 

And is so neat, 

A young bleached blond 

That "can't be beat." 

In a tight hair net 

And an apron clean 

All ready for cooking this person is seen. 

Sire is the class model, so they say, 

And such an example she sets every day ! 

But you must have guessed 

That she has som|e failing 

For so many letters she's always a-mailing, 

And gets from the postman 'most every day 

A letter so thick that it's safe to say 

That oft on said letter there's sure to be due 

The price of a one-cent stamp or two. 
West Carthage High School. 
7 Bridge Street, Carthage, N. Y. 
Household Economics. 
President New York State Club (4). 

Eleanor T. Randall 

"For she was just the quiet kind." 
Perhaps her wildest year was her Freshman year — if 
one can judge by hearsay. She's pretty faithful to her 
own home town, and doesn't stay around many week- 
ends. Suspicious! Eleanor doesn't talk much until 
she gets started, but then . . . She has the theatre 
habit, but doesn't see many Shakesperian plays — 
they're not in her line. 

I rampstead I ligli School. 

Hainpslead, N. H. 

Secretarial. 

74 



Helen Randall 

Helen always wore the "smile that won't come off," 
until she came to Cooking Class with us, when mystery 
enveloped the smile. We all thought she was playing 
another joke on us, but now we've decided she put it 
away to keep it from getting scorched. She always 
was very forehanded and thoughtful. 

Wakefield High School. 

4 Salem Street, Wakefield, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Rose D. Reardon 

"I know a maiden fair to see." 

Rose came from Worcester to join our class at Sim- 
mons. There's not a girl in college who can carry off 
a joke any better than she. Besides being known for 
this she is famed for her brightness and her beauty. 
When asked for the recipe Rose said "I was Reardon 
Cream of Wheat." 

Worcester Classical High School. 

17 Westminster Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Ella I. Reynolds 

"Inde" 

There's a girl in Simmons College 
Who is loved by all the Class, 
Her name is Ella Reynolds, 
And she's such a winsome lass. 
Her hair is dark and curly, 
Her eyes are big and brown, 
And she's sure to leave you smiling 
If you meet her with a frown. 



Canton High School. 

1878 Washington Street, Canton, 

Household Economics. 



Mass. 




75 




Ednah G. Rhodes 

"Dusty" 

Ednah is little, but often the little things surprise us 
the most. We have a feeling that Ednah won't disap- 
point us in any way whatever, and especially at Senior 
Luncheon. 

Quincy High School. 

21 Old Colony Avenue, Wollaston, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Usher at Junior Prom (2). 




Esther A. Richardson 

We like her, for she's jolly, 
A loyal friend and true, 
A chum who e'er stands ready 
To cheer us when we're blue. 



Brookline High School. 

37 Cypress Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Basketball ' (2, 3, 4), Track Manager 
Board. 



(3), S.A.A. Executive 




Caroline Righter 

"Early to bed and early to rise." 

The quotation used here is purposely sarcastic, as the 
slender night watchman gliding downstairs in his ballet 
slippers, often meets Caroline in the wee small hours. 
'Tis rumored it's the shows and concerts rather than a 
love of the academic that keeps her up till so early in 
the morning. Just the same, she's a good student and 
a better friend, and we're mighty glad she's one of us. 

Point Tervis High School. 

19 Ulster Place, Point Jervis, N. Y. 

Library. 



76 



Mary L. Riley 

"May" 

When classes all are going fine, 
Having started just at nine, 
At nine-fifteen this maiden neat 
Slips softly into a back seat, 
With such a tender, gentle sigh, 
That no one ever questions why. 
Pray, isn't this a noble feat? 

Notre Dame Academy. 

146 Rindge Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Frances V. V. Rodgers 

"V. V." "Frannie" "Fran" 

Like all friendships valued most 

Her's is not easy to earn. 
But you'll find her worth the cost, 

She'll cheer you at every turn. 

Just to hear Frannie tell of queer people and customs 
in lands far away is a treat. We only wish you'd tell us 
more. For instance, just how does it feel to be a native ? 
And is it your love for the unusual that leads you into 
such courses as Biology 3 and 4? Strange and won- 
derful are the tales one can bring back from the in- 
terior of a Harvard Medical Lab ! 

American Manila High School. 
Manila. Philippine Islands. 
Household Economics. 

Glee Club and Choir (2, 3, 4), Chairman Bihle Study of Y.W. 
C.A. (4), Treasurer Y.W. C. A. (3). 



Mary E. Rogers 

"Merry Sunshine" "Little Mary" 

Young and boyish and fond of clothes, 
Here she comes and there she goes. 

Miss Fitchett's School. 

Hampton Institute, Va. 

Library. 

Secretary Dramatic Association (4), Executive Board (4), 
President Dixie Club (4), Secretarv Dixie Club (3), Man- 
dolin Club (T, 2. 3, 4), Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (4), Chairman 
Senior-Freshman Party (4). 




77 




"We sev 



Florence M. Ross 

"Rossie" 

sew, prick our fingers, dull our sight, 
producing what?" 



Florence has not quite decided why sewing was ever 
invented. At present, at least, it seems to be for her 
special discomfort. However, dancing is a different 
matter. Her bright remarks and keen appreciation 
make her sought by all. 

Revere High School. 
Revere, Mass. 
Household Economics. 




* 



Alice M. Rounds 

"Alicia" "Al" 

"Hist, 'twas two hat pins that did it!" 
O Alice, though only a part of man's rib 
If the story in Genesis is not a fib, 
Should your naughty companion e'er quarrel with you 
You will certainly prove the best man of the two. 

You will rise, you will glower, you'll say with a smile, 
To that lord of creation, convinced of your guile : 
"Oh, why are you trembling?" he stiffens to see, 
. "Oh, why, Sir, are you, Sir, so frightened at me?" 

Hope Street High School. 

9 Oriole Avenue, Providence, R. I. 

Secretarial. 

Senior Prom Usher (3). 




Georgia L. Sawyer 



"Gcorgic" 



"George" "G" 



A goodly bit of subtle wit 

Plus system at its best. 

The moral is: just quiz and quiz — 

Sans mercy and sans rest. 

Saugus High School. 
SO Peterboro Street, Boston, Mass. 
Secretarial. 

Choir and Glee Club (3, 4), Chairman Cap and Gown Com- 
mittee (4). 



78 



Pauline A. Shalz 

"Polly" 

You'll always find her kind and true, 
As good a friend as you ever knew. 
And if, perchance, there's work to do: 
A song to write or a poem or two — 
Just ask Pauline — she'll not fail you. 

Girls' High School, Boston. 

Williams Memorial Institute. 

187 Townsend Street, Roxbury, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Gertrude A. Shaw 

"Peggy" 

There is a girl named Gertrude Shaw, 
Whose memory holds us all in awe. 
In Ec and Psych and English eight 
Upon her knowledge hangs her fate. 
Reference does not phase her at all, 
Answers come at her beck and call. 
On this foundation rests her fame. 
Loud and long her praise proclaim. 



Woodward Institute. 
Quincy. Mass. 
Library. 




Mary L. Shaw 

"Sliawsie" 

Mary has a little book 
With covers of brown leather ; 
And every time she writes in it 
Her forehead wrinkles a wee bit, 
With a philosophic, mesmeristic, scientific look. 
Alary plays hockey and basketball, and has also a 
leaning towards suffragettes, peanuts, and early radishes. 

Rockland High School. 

Ill E. Water Street, Rockland, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Basketball (2, 3, 4), Hockey (4). 




79 





Margaret E. Sinclair 

Here and there, 

With her tight-packed Boston bag and quiet air, 

Our Margaret Sinclair goes about 

'Neath the guise 

Of quiet mien — Behind those big brown silent eyes 

A world of wisdom lies. 

Let it out! 

Girls' Latin School. 

37 Forest Hills Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Library. 

Mildred C. Smith 

"Mil" 

"Ever laughs the sunlight in her eyes at morning and 
at noon." 

Mildred is cheerful and happy, a good sport and a 
good athlete. Simmons would like to have seen more 
of her, and tested her athletic abilities, but her home is 
too far away. 

Waltham High School. 
Waltham, Mass. 
Secretarial. 




Marjorie Soper 

"Marj" 

Ah, Marj, many of us have envied you your ability 
to sing your way into people's hearts. We admire also 
your desire to become a hockey player, though of course 
we guessed the reason. We have only one criticism — 
of late you have been a bit conspicuous in your dress. 
One can't help seeing that mammoth crimson H way 
across the dump. I suppose it stands for Happy, 
though, or maybe after all it's Hockey. 

Naugatuck High School. 

12 Wyman Street, Waterbury, Conn. 

Secretarial. 

Vice-President Class (2), Treasurer Dormitory Student Gov- 
ernment (2), President Musical Association (4). President 
Connecticut Club (4), Secretary Glee Club (3), Glee Club 
(1, 2, 3, 4), Choir (1, 2. 3, 4), Chairman Junior-Senior 
Picnic (3), Junior Prom Usher (2), Assistant Cheer 
Leader (4). 



80 



Ellen R. Stackhouse 

"Stack" 

"And who will walk a mile with me 

Along life's winding way? 
A friend whose heart has eyes to see — 

A friend who knows and dares to say 
The brave, sweet words that cheer the way 

Where he walks a mile with me." 

Just such a friend is Ellen — loyal, warm-hearted, 
and full of cheer — and appreciated most by those who 
know her best. 

Notre Dame Academy. 

168 Temple Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Marion E. Stark 

"She cooks like mother, and though tall is lean." 

While Marion could get a meal out of a handful of 
flour and a cup of oil, she will never be competing with 
the famous widow, because she can't guarantee to have 
a supply left for tomorrow. She's happiest when she's 
feeding the girls, and her friends are always the sleekest 
looking of us all. But the rest of us would like to 
remind her that the sharpest appetites make the keenest 
minds, and she doesn't want to spoil all her friends' 
chances. 

Manchester High School. 

99 North Adams Street, Manchester, N. H. 

Household Economics. 

Edith L. Stearns 

"Ede" 

We hope that Edith will be as loyal to 1916 as she is 
to Manchester, N. H. Of course we realize that Man- 
chester is a very fine place to come from, and that pretty 
nice people come from there, but that is nothing com- 
pared to being a member of the class of 1916. Edith is 
fast becoming so wealthy as a result of her night teach- 
ing that we fear she will be chosen for her sterling 
worth rather than for the fact that she comes from 
Manchester. 

Manchester High School. 

129 Salmon Street, Manchester, N. H. 

Household Economics. 

President New Hampshire Club (4), Vice-President New 
Hampshire Club (3), Endowment Fund (1, 2, 3, 4), Chair- 
man Senior Valentine Committee (4), Chairman 1910 Re- 
union Committee (3), Junior Prom Usher (2). 






n 




Lucy W. Stearns 

"Stearnsie" 

Lucy has two most evident possessions — a Puritan 
conscience and an unabridged text book in Chemistry 
by Alexander Smith. Lucy says that she'll never teach, 
and it is thought that some day she'll introduce a new 
theory for osmosis, or perhaps she may find three atoms 
in a molecule of chlorine instead of two. 

Lawrence High School. 

12 Mount Pleasant Street, Winchester, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Muriel Stevens 

She has all the charm of the girls of our grand- 
mother's day, their delicacy, their sweetness, and in 
addition to that she has twentieth century efficiency ! 
That's an unbeatable combination. 

Rochester High School. 

210 Park Street, W. Roxbury, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Basketball (1, 2), Track (1, 2), Junior Prom Usher (2). 




Myra Stevens 

"Steve" 

A Kansas sunbeam has consented to shine for us, 
for two years. She's so young and beautiful that 
Freshmen take her for a classmate when she enters 
Physics I. 

Lawrence High School. 
Lawrence, Kansas. 
Household Economics. 



82 



Esther L. Stickney 

Nothing ever troubles Esther. She just smiles over 
everything. The rest of us can grow gray over tran- 
scripts and red over speed tests, but Esther just keeps 
on making initials in her dish towels, and smiles. We 
wish we could smile ! 

Maiden High School. 

34 Francis Street, Maiden, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Alice A. Stone 

"Al" "Stubbo" 

"A certain dignity of manners." 

Alice's name suits her well. She is stately and re- 
served, that is, on the outside. But how different it all 
is when we know her; then the fun creeps out; we 
laugh and chuckle and wonder why we thought it hard 
to get acquainted with her. 

Maiden High School. 

417 Tremont Street, Maiden, Mass. 

Secretarial. 




Margaret A. Sullivan 

Marks she gets which do abound in A's, 

In music, too, she is profound always, 

And oft with wit and humor droll resounds that phrase 

Which from her lips does fall. 

With hastily noting pen, she jots down news 

From blackboard, bulletin or interviews, 

And these, with Simmons' spirit she imbues; 

Then best — she is a friend with all. 

Classical High School. 
40 Chandler Street, Worcester. 
Secretarial. 

Microcosm Board (4), Student Editor of Quarterly (4), 
Quarterly Board (3). 




83 




Olive M. Titus 

"O. M." "Polly" 

Olive Titus, she 

Writes poetry. 

Just you wait and see, 

And presently 

Glory and fame 

Will get hitched to her name, 

And we'll be proud of she. 

Newton High School. 

1129 Boylston Street, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Quarterly Board (3, 4), Persimmons Board (3), Track (1). 





Elizabeth P. Todd 

"Beth" "Lizzie" 

"The heart will break, yet brokenly live on." 

If Elizabeth's medium of exchange is glue, what is 
Aiken ? 

Subtle but apt. 

That this fair, wide-eyed child should have a weak- 
ness for movies is to be deplored, but the cure can't be 
found. According to Beth a man isn't a man unless he 
wears good-looking shoes. She considers galoshes be- 
coming to a certain type. She despises underhand 
methods, but is always willing to answer any leading 
questions. 

Lyndon Institute. 

75 Elm Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Sara R. Toll 

"Sally" 

Sally is a blushing violet who hides her light under a 
bushel. She left Cornell after a year, and has spent 
the rest of her time with us, trying to avoid becoming 
well-known. 

Schenectady High School. 

Scotia, N. Y. 

Secretarial. 

Usher at Junior Prom (2). 



84 



Margaret Tolman 

"Peggy" 

Margaret's digestion has improved since she found 
it was an unredeemable excuse, and consequently her ice 
cream bills are light. 

Portland High School. 

260 Vaughan Street. Portland, Maine. 

Household Economics. 

Gertrude E. Triplett 



"Trudy' 



'■Tripletts" 



"By the way, you know there's a fallacy in the saying, 
the early bird catches the worm." 

No one calls Trudy or Tripletts Gertrude, except 
her mother and father and one other. She's a born 
Maniac although her present home is in Cherokee, 
N. C. With this broad experience for a background 
Trudy patronizes both the Dixie and Maine Clubs 
(and incidentally Bowdoin dances) where her wealth 
of wit makes her very welcome. For her life work she 
wants to be a Dietitian, but she acknowledges herself 
defeated at the outset as no nice girl can be born a 
brunette and die a titian. 

Bangor High School. 

Cherokee, N. C. 

Household Economics. 

Secretary Dormitory Student Government (3). 




May F. Twitchell 

"Molly" "Masie" 
"To spend too much time in study is sloth." 

A little study and a lot of fun are May's maxims. 
She never worries about a mere lesson, but then why 
should she? But just suggest a good time, and she 
is ready to join in. We never feel blue when with her, 
for she always has some story to tell that brings a 
laugh. 

Sawin Academy. 

37 Western Avenue, Framingham, Mass. 

Library. 

Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Choir (1, 2, 3, 4). 




85 




Helen N. Upham 

"Uppie" 

"If I could bid the fifth welcome with so good a 
heart as I can bid the other four farewell I should be 
glad of his approach," said Helen when she left the 
University of Wisconsin for Simmons. 

Duluth Central High School. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Household Economics. 




Katherine A. Walker 

"Kit" "Kay" "Kitty" 

"Her ready help was always nigh." 

But how she ever draws those marvelous marks is 
more than we can see, for every single moment between 
sunrise and sunset is spent in plying the needles, knit- 
ting and otherwise. 

Beverly High School. 
Beverly, Mass. 
Household Economics. 

Mandolin Club (2, 3, 4), Assistant Business Manager Per- 
simmons (3). 




Lorna A. Wardwell 

"Waddy" 

"Hail ! Independence, Hail !" 

She reads late at night, 

Likes good things to eat, 

She walks with a dignified lurch. 

She's a very good student, 

A very true friend, 

And a constant attendant at church. 



Stamford Seminary. 
Stamford, N. Y. 
Library. 



86 



Elmere Waring 

"Ellie" 

We have learned that Elmere has given up all candy 
but "Apollo," and we hope that by doing this she will 
be able to live up to her "high" ideal. 

Worcester Classical High School. 

20 Strathmore Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




Emily G. Webb 

"Enunc" 
"She moves a goddess and she looks a queen." 

Why are all the Freshmen standing? Be seated, 
girls, that tall, dignified, spare personage is not a 
"faculty" or "corporation" — it's only Emme. 

She stalks down the corridor like an iceberg, but you 
can't fool us, we know where to go when we want a 
responsible job done well — we know the capability that 
shyly hides beneath that frosty veneer. 

Rockland High School. 

Rockland, Maine. 

Household Economics. 

Vice-President Maine Club (3), Vice-Chairman Student Gov- 
ernment (4), Honor Committee (2, 3, 4), House Chair- 
mian (2, 3), Chairman Refreshments Committee, Sopho- 
more Luncheon, Executive Board (4). 




Lillian Webber 

"Spider' "Webber" 

"There are, who to my person pay their court." 

Take an awfully nice girl, "Ante" variety, although 
her hair is curly, steep her in sewing and sprinkle in 
millinery, and you have Lillian. She is one of our best 
dancers. It is rumored that an ancestor of hers in- 
vented the nastiest of psychological laws, but as the 
majority of the class spell his name V-a-p-o-r, the rela- 
tionship has been lost till now. 

Cambridge Latin School. 

199 Hunnewell Terrace, Newton, Mass. 

Household Economics. 




87 




Margaret M. Welch 

She is a calm, deliberate person, even going through 
the ordeal of exams without a tremor and coming out 
at the top with marks which put many of us to shame. 

Wellesley High School. 

332 Washington Street, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Library. 





Marion C. Wetmore 

"Betty" 

Although our Marion is always to be found at the 
back of the class-rooms she is invariably first in her les- 
sons. Real industrious studying has marked her course 
through Simmons. We are sure she deserves a fine 
position and much success in her future career. 

East Boston High School. 

64 North Street, West Somerville, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Glee Club (3, 4), Choir (1, 2, 3, 4). 



Alice M. Wheeler 

"Ar 

Ferdinand. — "Here's my hand." 

Miranda. — "And mine, with my heart in't." 

It's said she's fond of parlor games. Alice enjoyed 
herself at prom. Her sympathies are easily aroused, 
especially at the theatre, and we hope she'll have a 
goodly supply of handkerchiefs along when her "greatest 
moment" comes. Alice enjoyed herself at prom. She 
has been a hard worker in Y.W.C.A., and has done 
much for that association. Alice certainly enjoyed her- 
self at prom. 

Waltham High School. 

74 Adams Street, Waltham, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (3), Mandolin Club (3, 4), Chairman Col- 
lege Calendar Committee of Y.W.C.A. (3). Chairman Social 
Service Committee of Y.W.C.A. (4). 



Marion D. Wheeler 

"Wheel" 
If tnere is any truth in the saying that "Diligence 
brings good luck," then Marion will surely have good 
luck, for diligence is her strong point. Morning, noon, 
and night you can find her with the Multigraph in 117, 
running off green copies by the hundreds; and this 
diligence isn't reserved solely for the Multigraph either. 
But, just a word to the wise — she's as jolly as they 
make 'em ; plays a good game of basketball any day ; 
and it is rumored her puns are frequent and fierce. 

Sharon High School. 

Glendate Road, Sharon, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Basketball (1, 2. 3, 4), Track (1, 2, 3, 4), Subvarsity Team 
(2), Choir (1). 

Sara A. White 

"Sally" 
"Millinery that sucked the honey of thy breath, 
Hath no power yet upon thy beauty." 
Imagine a stillness, with curly hair, straightforward 
brown eyes and a turned up nose, and you have Sara 
before you, more life-like than any Microcosmic picture. 
With the most self-effacing nature in the world, Sara 
would have been forgotten in the rush of 1 9 16's career, 
if it hadn't been for her nifty little brain which leaves 
the rest of us panting at the foot of the hill while she 
goes chugging up to the top. 
Unadilla High School. 
Unadilla, N. Y. 
Household Economics. 

Martha A. Whiting 

"Mart" 
"Three in one" 

Like the famous shoe polish Martha has all the at- 
tributes of three of her kind in one. There's nothing 
she cannot do, and that is a conservative estimate. She 
gets more done in twenty-four hours than most of us 
do in forty-eight, and she's teasing the rest of us all the 
time. Although here at Simmons Martha is fast 
learning to be a Secretary, she will probably be earn- 
ing her living two years hence by giving "singing" 
lessons. Let us all devoutly hope that an early mar- 
riage will not cut short this happy though useful life. 
Horace Mann High School. 
11 East Street, Franklin, Mass. 
Secretarial. 

Class Secretary (2, 4), Executive Board (3), Captain, Basket- 
ball (4), Manager, Basketball (3), Subvarsitv Team (3), 
Basketball (1, 3, 4), Choir (2, 3, 4), Class Reporter for 
Persimmons (4), Junior Prom Usher (2). 

89 






Marion A. D. Wilkinson 

"Slow and steady wins the race." 

So Marion thinks, and no doubt she's right, for 
we're sure she's proved the rule. 

Girls' Latin School, Boston. 

23 W. Cottage Street, Dorchester. 

Household Economics. 




Ella L. Wood 

"Noble in thought and act and practised what she 
preached," 

— only she doesn't preach. Always dependable for 
instant and generous service, Ella bestows kindness 
without being asked. 

dishing Academy. 

57 Westbourne Terrace, Brookline, Mass. 
Secretarial. 

Basketball (1, 2, 4), Chairman Address Book Committee (3), 
Endowment Fund Committee (3). 




Gladys E. Woodman 

"A dogrose blushing to a brook, 
Ain't modester nor sweeter." 

Such is our Glad3's! Hale and hearty, she comes 
from a land where fraternity pins flourish, so they say. 
For books, she cares not a whit, absorbing knowledge as 
a sponge does water. While others toil, she goes peace- 
fully on her way, leaving things to take care of them- 
selves on the morrow. 

Worcester Classical High School. 
32 Blake Street, Westborough. 
Household Economics. 



90 



Blanche Woodward 

"Rosy Red" ■■Blanket" "Bronzy" 
"Guess me ! Can you ? Jack." 

She's Unionville's pride, and among the many im- 
portant positions which she has filled so well, we must 
not forget to mention her noble work as Recruiting 
Officer of "The League." Though her favorite idioms 
weren't passed by the "National Board of Censorship," 
we feel quite safe in quoting her to the extent of "Call 
me Wildflower," but "Believe me if both those en- 
dearing young charms." 

Horace Mann School. 

Franklin, Mass. 

Secretarial. 

Class Treasurer (4), Cheer Leader (2, 3). 




Lena Wright 

"Lone" "Baby Wright" "Ruffe" 

Some day when she grows up she will marry the 
man of her choice and live in a "dear little cottage," 
with vines and a garden. She will insist upon 
the latter, because gardening has been her specialty 
in Simmons, and 'twere a shame to have so much 
knowledge lie dormant. Lena also is quite an athlete 
and has proven herself a credit to 1916. 

Ogdensburg High School. 

251 Knox Street, Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Household Economics. 

Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4). 



M. Eunice Wright 

"Courteous, though shy and gentle, though retired." 

A sober Senior, whose friendship is deep rather than 
broad, is Eunice. She is one of those quiet girls of 
1916, and a very valuable addition to the class. 

Practical Arts High School. 
Roxbury, Mass. 
Household Economics. 




91 





Marjorie Yates 

"Marj" "Mrs. Yahts" 
"My tears, the moist impediments unto my speech." 

Cleopatra is a creature of moods, and those fascina- 
ting ear-rings act as a sort of barometer. Although an 
ardent enthusiast about the West, Marj doesn't look 
down upon the East — down East. She is a winner 
at basketball, and is a wonder when she gets on her 
spiked shoes at track. Marj has a lot of us guessing. 

Boise High School. 

The Anchorage, Boise, Idaho. 

Lihrary. 

President S.A.A. (4), Class Vice-President (3), Secretary 
S.A.A. (2), Endowment Fund Committee (1, 2, 3), Guild 
Council Secretary (3), Track Manager (2), House Chair- 
man (2), Track (1), Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), Varsity (1, 2, 
3). Captain, Basketball (3). 

Helen E. Young 

"Hattie" 
"Otherwise known as the rejuvenating influence." 

Helen's favorite drama is a dialogue entitled "The 
Romance of the Hatrack" — a charming playlet suitable 
for amateurs. The drama is in one act lasting two 
hours, and the principal characters hold the centre of 
the stage during the entire performance. Never mind, 
Helen's a dear, and we all know it. 

Brockton High School 

140 Market Street, Campello, Mass. 

Household Economics. 

Glee Club (2, 3, 4), Choir (2, 3. 4). 




92 



iffnrmpr JflUmfora of tl|^ OJlasa of 19 IB 

Name. Home. 

ADAMS. MARION G 42 Linden Street, Rockland, Maine 

ALDEN, ANNIE L 22 Jerome Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

ARMANT, GOLDA B 6 Gary Street, Binghamton, N. Y. 

ARMSTRONG. DOROTHY M 44 Foster Street, Boston, Mass. 

BAKER, CLARA D Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

BAKER, ELINOR Needliam, Mass. 

BALLARD, ALICE J. . Meredith, N. H. 

BECKLEY. MAY I. (Mrs. Raphael Billon) Montreal, Canada 

BLAISDELL, HELEN H 316 Main St., Lewiston, Maine 

BOYLE, MARY L 63 Columbia Street, Salem, Ohio 

BRAGDON, EDNA W York Village, Maine 

*BROWN, ESTELLA I Collinsville, Conn. 

BROWN, FLORENCE M Putnam, Conn. 

BROWN. MARGARET R 3 Terrace Row, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

BROWNLIE, E. ALINE 364 East 14th Street, Davenport, Iowa 

CABOT, HELEN L 84 Highland Avenue, Winchester, Mass. 

CARLING, WINIFRED Oxford, Mass. 

CARY, HELEN H 222 Liberty Street, Lowell, Mass. 

CHANDLER. ADELE 118 Court Street, Plymouth, Mass. 

CHASE, LAURA P Dedham Avenue, Dedham, Mass. 

COMMONS, M. FRANCES .... 1445 Washington Street, West Newton, Mass. 

CONGDON, NETTIE . - 74 Lincoln Street, Nantucket, Mass. 

CONNOLLY, MARGARET A 220 Parkway, Chelsea, Mass. 

CRAGIN, JEAN Farmington, Maine 

CUNNIFF, JOSEPHINE M 1032 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

DAVIS, LOIS H Roslvn, N. Y. 

DEMING, KATHERINE 69 Atkinson Street, Bellows Falls, Vt. 

DERBY, DOROTHY 18 Westwood Road, Somerville, Mass. 

DEWEY. DOROTHY P 163 Dartmouth Terrace, Springfield, Mass. 

DIXON. GLADYS L ' 73 Dana Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

DOONE, HELEN S Brewster, Mass. 

DONOVAN, IRENE E 10 Ophir Street, Boston, Mass. 

DOUGLAS, KATHERINE Ogdenburg, N. Y. 

DOWD, URSULA M 60 West Street, Ware, Mass 

EDGERLY. BEATRICE J Farmington, N. H. 

ENSLIN. ESTHER Ashland, Mass. 

FAIRCHILD, LOUISE M Durham, N. H. 

FLAHERTY, MARY M 19 South Irving Street, Worcester, Mass. 

FOSTER. HELEN M - Hingham Center, Mass. 

FULLER. BEATRICE L. (Mrs. George Morse) . 49 Thompson Street, Clinton, Mass. 

GANE, E. MARGUERITE Keene, N. H. 

GEER. GLADYS V Scotland, Conn. 

GLOVER, KATHERINE Danvers, Mass. 

GOODWIN. CELIA W Pittsfield, Mass. 

GOULD, MYRA C 84 Taylor Street, Holyoke, Mass. 

GREEN, HELEN 100 Henry Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

GREEN, FLORENCE M 17 Miller Avenue, East Braintree, Mass. 

GRIFFIN, GWENDOLEN Pittsfield, Maine 

HAGAN, VESTA S 18 Victoria Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

HALL, CLARA E. (Mrs. J. W. Fuller) . 

HALL, FRANCES E Canandaigua, N. Y. 

HALL. GRACE E 201 St. Helen's Avenue, Tacoma, Wash. 



93 



Name. Home. 

HAMMOND, MILDRED M . . Somersworth, N. H. 

HARRISON, MARY J 81 Clark Street, Torrington, Conn. 

HAWKINS, MIRIAM E Lancaster, Mass. 

HAYES, LORETTA M. 331 Barnum Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. ' 

HAYES, RUBY P. ..... ' South Hamilton, Mass. 

HOITT, MABEL V 114 Franklin Street, Lynn, Mass. 

HOLDEN, ETHEL M. . . . Shirley, Mass. 

HOUGHTON, EDNA P 73 Elm Street, Ansonia, Conn. 

HUGHES, DOROTHEA M. ...... . 144 Randolph Street, Milton, Mass. 

HUTZLER, BERTHA F 82 Cliff Street, Norwich, Conn. 

INGLIS, DOROTHY B Grosse Ille, Mich. 

JACKSON, ELEANOR 483 Grand Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

JONES, HELEN S 3 Valley Road, Stamford, Conn. 

KELLAM, HELEN D 554 Chenango Street, Binghamton, N. Y. 

LA GANKE, RUTH E 2175 East 71st Street, Cleveland, Ohio 

LANDER, JEANNETTE F Hingham, Maine 

LAWRENCE, EVELYN L 255 Washington Street, Binghamton, N. Y. 

LITTLE, AMELIA W Little's Lane, Newburyport, Mass. 

LITTLE, ELIZABETH 21 Lincoln Street, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

LOCKHART, MARGARET Almond, N. Y. 

LOFSTEDT, S. CHRISTINA 10 Westland Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

LOWELL, ELEANOR N 39 High Street, Newburyport, Mass. 

LOWENSTAM, PAULINE 339 East Spruce Street, Manchester, N. H. 

LUCAS, MABEL E Boston, Mass. 

LUCE, ESTHER 128 South Street, Pittsfield, Mass. 

LUTHIN, FRANCES E 72 Gardner Street, Allston, Mass. 

McDUFF, CLAUDIA E 11 Marlboro Street, Newton, Mass. 

MANN, MARGARET E . 25 N. Main Street, Lewiston, Pa. 

MATHER, KATHERINE 92 Broad Street, Charleston, S. C. 

MEADER, PEARL E 13 St. Stephen's Street, Lynn, Mass. 

MELCHER, VELMA 29 Park Street, Barre, Vt. 

MERRIAM, EMILY D Framingham, Mass. 

MIDDLETON, KATHERINE J 48 Oak Street, Hyde Park, Mass. 

MORRISON, E. KATHRYN 714 East Washington St., Muncie, Ind. 

O'REILLY, ANNA S 146 Vernon Street, Worcester, Mass. 

O'REILLY, MARY I . 146 Vernon Street, Worcester, Mass. 

O'CALLAGHAN, ELIZABETH A 51 Bullard Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

ORDWAY, MARION L Winthrop, Mass. 

PERRY, DOROTHEA K 285 Pearl Street, Manchester, N. H. 

PERRY, MARION R Weston, Mass. 

PHILBROOK, HELEN A 439 Torry Street, Maiden, Mass. 

POND, EDNA L 99 Highland Street, West Newton, Mass. 

*POTTLE, HELEN B. Farmington, Maine 

PRATT, HELEN M 72 Washington Square, East Salem, Mass. 

READY, MILDRED M. 72 Leicester Street, Brighton, Mass. 

ROBBINS, FRANCES M 29 Winter Street, Arlington, Mass. 

ROBERTSON, AGNES E 448 Edgewood Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

ROBINSON, HARRIET E 4 East Street, Ipswich, Mass. 

ROBINSON, HELEN M St. George, Maine 

ROGERS, ELEANOR A Sanbornville, N. H. 

ROOP, RUTH L 32 Paul Revere Road, Arlington Heights, Mass. 

RUSSELL, MADELINE T 42 Lindsey Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

RUSSELL, SARAH 13 Albion Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

RUTLEDGE, AGNES P Billerica, Mass. 

SALLS, MARY W 14 Hampden Street, Wellesley, Mass. 



94 



A' a inc. 



Home. 



SAMPSON, ELIZABETH 904 East Jackson Street, Muncie, Ind. 

SAUNDERS. ELIZABETH V. . . . . .42 Church Street, North Attleboro, Mass. 

SHERMAN, ETHEL M Liberty, Maine 

SILLESKY, FLORENCE (Mrs. A. W. Jack) . . .342 Washburn Street, Lockport, N. Y. 

SMITH, MARION L Lyon Avenue, Menands, N. Y. 

SMITH. MYRTLE D 15 Holborn Street, Roxbury, Mass. 

SPEAR, ELIZABETH Main Street, Walpole, Mass. 

SPENCER, ANNA L Malone, N. Y. 

STAPLES, BEULAH R 11 Leonard Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

STERLING, KATHERINE B Park Place, Portland, Maine 

STINSON, MARGARET Windsor, Conn. 

SWEENEY, NORA 155 Berkley Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

TAPPEN, KATHERINE B 43 Davis Avenue, Brookline, Mass. 

THAYER, NORA F Lancaster, Mass. 

THOMAS, GERTRUDE W Western Springs, 111. 

THOMPSON. MARGARET T. (Mrs. C. M. Fenker) Cincinnati, Ohio 

TUCKER, ESTHER F 659 Hoyt Street, Portland, Oregon 

TUL1S, MARY E Weston, Mass. 

WADE, DOROTHY E .553 Morton Street, Stoughton, Mass. 

WALKER, RUTH E. (Mrs. George Abbott) . . 321 Belmont Street, Manchester, N. H. 

WALSH, M. LOUISE Manchester, Mass. 

WHITEHEAD, MARGARET 209 Eighth Avenue, La Grange, 111. 

WHITING, DOROTHY Winsted, Conn. 

WHITNEY, MARGUERITE 137 Chestnut Street, Needham, Mass. 

WITT, RUTH H. . . . • 52 White Street, Boston, Mass. 

WOLCOTT. RUBY M Shinglehouse, Pa. 

WOODBRIDGE, LYDIA M 1735 Wallace Avenue, Duluth, Minn. 

YATES, MARGARET (Mrs. Frederick Breitinger) Germantown, Pa. 




95 




JUNIORS 



( " 




Helen L. Harlow 
Vice-President 



Mary V. Pollard 
President 



Eleanore F. Keith 
Treasurer 



Abby E. Partridge 

Secretary 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Marguerite Bond Mabel L. Mackenzie 

Louise A. Giblin Ernestine Packard 

Class Color: Pink 




98 



GIIaHfl of 19 If 

Name. Home. 

ABBOTT, BARBARA M. ...-..,_ N. Reading 

ANSON, OLIVE E ". Worcester 

AYER, MARION P Biddeford, Me. 

BALDWIN, HANNAH B Schenevus, N. Y. 

BALDWIN, IONE Santa Cruz, Cal. 

BARROWS, OLIVE' Hartford, Conn. 

BARTON, EDITH A New Milford, Conn. 

BATHGATE, MART AN Newark, N. J. 

BEAL, CONSTANCE Newton 

BECKFORD. ESTHER E Quincy 

BELLAIRE, JESSIE M Randolph 

BETTS, NATALIE D Scranton, Pa. 

BLACK, DOROTHY M Stamford, Conn. 

BOND, MARGUERITE Adams 

BOORN, MARION C Brattleboro, Vt. 

BOWMAN, MARION Sharon 

BOYCE, HELEN R Stoneharn 

BRADLEY, FRANCES M Branford, Conn. 

BROWN, BEATRICE O Danvers 

BROWN, LELA Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

BURNES, MARION Boston 

CHAPLIN, MARIE E Pawtucket, R. I. 

CHILDS, BLANCHE E Waltham 

CHURCHILL, SALLY Berlin, N. H. 

CLANCEY, HELEN I Milford 

CLARK, HELEN M Madison, Me. 

CLAUSSEN, ELSE A St. Paul, Minn. 

CORWIN, RUTH B Newark, N. J. 

COTTRELL, ALMA Gloucester 

COX. NATHALIE Wakefield 

CRAIG, MARION T. .- Portsmouth, N. H. 

CURRIER, PHEBE Colebrook, N. H. 

DAVIS, CAROLYN R Everett 

DAVIS, RUTH A Royalston 

DECELLE, HELEN M. . . . - Somerville 

DITTMER, M. FRANCES Brookline 

DOLE, ETHEL Concord, N. H. 

DONNELLY, GLADYS S Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DOTEN, MARION Somerville 

DRISCOLL, MARION A Brookline 

DUNMORE, N. GERTRUDE Providence, R. I. 

EASTMAN, MARJORIE Belleville, N. Y. 

EASTMAN, NETTIE V New Boston, N. H. 

ELLIS, GERTRUDE J Ansonia, Conn. 

EMERSON, EVELYN Brattleboro, Vt. 

ENARSON, ANNA H Montclair, N. J. 

FEE, LILLIAN C Boston 

FLANDERS. FLORENCE H New Hampton, N. H. 

FLYNN, ANNIE M Saugus 

FOSTER, HELEN M : Hingham 

FRANCIS, RUTH I Medford 

FRIZZELL, DORIS I Colebrook, N. H. 

FULLER. HARRIET L New Haven, Conn. 



99 



Name. Home. 

GAGE, MARJORIE H ' N. Reading 

GEORGE, WINIFRED R Maiden 

GIBLIN, LOUISE A • Boston 

GILLETTE, HELEN H Revere 

GLADWIN, MARGARET L Westfield 

GLOVER, ABBIE G Somerville 

GOVAN, BERTHA M Cambridge 

GRADY, HELEN G Medford 

GRADY, MARION E Medford 

GRAHAM, LILLIAN B Boston 

GREGORY, ELEANOR R Newark, N. J. 

GREGORY, ESTHER R Newark, N. J. 

HAGERTY, KATHERINE M. Boston 

HAMMOND, ELIZABETH S. Norwalk, Conn. 

HANEY, KATHLEEN M Boston 

HARLOW, HELEN L Leavenworth, Kans. 

HASS, ELVERA P Rehoboth 

HAWES, INA L Oxford 

HAYNES, EDNA F Methuen 

HEALD, MADGE M Lovell, Me. 

HITT, PAULINE S Margaretville, N. Y. 

HOLBROOK, JENNIE L Douglas 

HOLLAND, MABEL Easton 

HOPKINS, OLIVE Waltham 

HUDNUT, RUTH A New Bedford 

JOHNSON, LOUISE P Brookline 

JONES, ANNA N Northborough 

KARNAN, ROSE W Boston 

KEITH, ELEANORE F Newton 

KIMBALL, KATHERINE Littleton 

KING, FRANCES E Holyoke 

KIRBY, ANNA M Boston 

LANDER, RUTH B Bingham, Me. 

LANE, EDNA P Boston 

LAPHAM, PHYLLIS Boston 

LAWRENCE, FAY A Tilton, N. H. 

LELAND, EVA Holliston 

LEWIS, CHRISTINE M W. Haven, Conn. 

McAULIFFE, MARY A Uxbridge 

McCABE, JULIA A N. Attleborough 

MCCARTHY, CECILIA A Haverhill 

MacKAY, ELEANOR C Somerville 

MACKENZIE, MABEL L Boston 

McLOUGLIN, MARY M Worcester 

McMULLIN, JESSIE H Cambridge 

MANNING, KATHARINE A Newton 

MASON, PEARL L Adams 

MAUK, BEATRICE G Van Wert, Ohio 

MILLER, ELISABETH Warren, Ohio 

MILLIKEN, B. ROMAYNE Cambridge 

MORTON, MILDRED Newton 

MUNT, CATHERINE F. Northbridge 

MURPHY, LOUISE W Boston 

MURPHY, MARY J Natick 

NASH, LUCY H Boston 



100 



Name. Home. 

NELSON, BLANCHE A Boston 

OLIN, INEZ M Leroy, Ohio 

O'MALLEY, LOUISE P __ Gorham, N. H. 

ORMOND, MARGARET Grove City, Pa. 

PACKARD, ERNESTINE Winchester 

PARKER, ALICE Quincy 

PARKER, MARY F Cooksville, Md. 

PARNELL, ARABELLE Manchester, N. H. 

PARSONS, LEILA B Penn Yan, N. Y. 

PARTRIDGE, ABBY E Bluehill, Me. 

PEIRCE, MARGARET Chelsea 

PETERS, MARY S Andover 

POLLARD, MARY V Proctorsville, Vt. 

POTTER, CORDELLA R Plattsburg, N. Y. 

RICE, DOROTHEA N Boston 

RICHARDSON, GLADYS E Woburn 

RICKER, CHRISTINE I Cambridge 

RIEGEL, MARGARET E New Cumberland, Pa. 

ROBERTS. REENA Somerville 

ROWE, LAURA M Peacham, Vt. 

RUGGLES, HELEN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RUTAN, GRACE H Maynard 

SADOW, ETTA S ' . . Plymouth 

SCHUMAN, ETHEL M Columbia City, Ind. 

SEGEL, MIRIAM Melrose 

SHELDON, GLADYS A Lee 

SHOHAN, ADELE R Boston 

SLADE, RUTH C ■ Southborough 

SMITH, ALMA M Pittsfield 

SMITH, FAYETTA E Hartford, Conn. 

SMITH, VERA Somerville 

SPALLER, UNA M Painesville, Ohio 

SPOONER, MARGARETTA R Harrisburg, Penn. 

SPRAGUE, KATHARINE G Newton 

STANLEY, ADA K Waterbury, Conn. 

STEELE, GLADYS E Somerville 

STEVENS, ALICE M Boston 

STOVER, CLARA L Newburyport 

TAPLEY, L. IDELLA Kalamazoo, Mich. 

THOMPSON, GLADYS L Norwich, Conn. 

THOMPSON, MABEL H Newton 

TOLAND, WILLAMAY Burke, N. Y. 

TOLMAN, HELEN I Hanover 

TURNER. H. DOROTHY Reading 

UPDEGRAFF, RUTH Vallejo, Cal. 

VAN ORDEN, DOROTHY Pompton Lakes, N. J. 

VAN WINKLE, WILHELMENA A Rutherford, N. J. 

WALKER, MARGARET Beverly 

WALKEY, IDA B Saugus 

WATERMAN. ADELE A Hanover 

WHITING, HELEN Boston 

WINN, N. LILLIAN Winchester 

WOOD, MARGARET O Middleborough 

WOODBRIDGE. LYDIA M Duluth, Minn. 



101 




^SofHOMOFfcS 



Norma G. Dill 
Vice-President 




(Sf&tsva 

Verta I. Mills 
President 



Millicent Bliss 
Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 



Sarah C. Page 
Secretary 



Marion J. Abbott 
Dorothy Mackie 



Katharine G. McManmon 
Anna K. Silver 



Class Color: Red 




104 




GUana of 1910 



Name. Home. 

ABBOTT, FLORENCE C ~"~. Melrose 

ABBOTT, MARION J Fonda, N. Y. 

ABBOTT, MARJORIE I Franklin 

ADAMS, DOROTHY F - Boston 

ALGER, SALOME W W. Bridgewater 

AMES, EDITH M Quincy 

AMSDEN, RUTH M Petersham 

ANDREWS, PEARL Orange 

ANNABLE. DOROTHY Salem 

ARMINGTON, DOROTHY F Boston 

BABCOCK, HELEN R Jefferson, Ohio 

BAILEY, FLORENCE E Woodfords, Maine 

BAKER, GRACE A N. Attleborough 

BANCROFT, PRISCILLA Haverhill 

BAXTER, MARY L Somerville 

BECK, LUCY P Braintree 

BECKER, MARION E Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BECKWITH, LOUISE F Stafford Springs, Conn. 

BISHOP, GLADYS S Southington, Conn. 

BLISS, MILLICENT Lynn 

BLOOD. DOROTHY C Newton 

BOSWORTH, HATTIE E Falls Village, Conn. 

BRIGGS, FREDA M Glens Falls, N. Y. 

BRIGHAM', ROSALIE I Nashua, N. H. 

BURNES, BESSIE Boston 

CAUMAN, JOSEPHINE E Boston 

CHASE, MARIETTA L Webster 

CHURCH, BEATRICE Hampton, N. H. 

CLIFFORD, ELIZABETH H Newton 

COLLINS, RUTH M Lakeport, N. H. 

COLLINS, RUTH S Toledo, Ohio 

CONWAY, EDNA W Quincy 

CORY. GERTRUDE F Hoopeston, 111. 

CRABTREE, LEAH E Island Falls, Maine 

CRAWFORD. LILLIAN Cambridge 

CRAWLEY, MARJORIE Gloucester 

CROSWELL. EVELYN A Wellesley 

CURRIN, ALTHEA M Waltham 

D.ALAND, GENEVA A Wakefield 

DAMON, DAPHNE M Hawaii 

DAVIDSON, CORA B Ramsey, N. J. 

DAWLEY, MARY L Norwich, Conn. 

DAY, DOROTHY M Bellows Falls, Vt. 

DAY, THEODORA A Boston 

DEANE, HELEN F Fall River 

DICKSON, CAROLYN M Boston 

DIKE, ERMA M Stoneham 

DILL, NORMA G Medford 

DODGE, GLADYS Alton, N. H. 

DOHERTY, LOUISE L Newton 

DONOVAN, KATHERINE M Boston 

DUBOIS, RUTH Lynn 



105 



Name. Home. 

DUNN, EDITH R ' Weston 

DUTCHER, JESSIE R Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DYER, LILLIAN Boston 

EDDY, JOSEPHINE F Indianapolis, Ind. 

ELLIS, MARY F Westwood 

EL WELL, FRANCES Milford 

FERSON, ANGELINE Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

FIELD, BERNICE Sharon 

FISHER, ELIZABETH E Dedham 

FITZGERALD, RUTH E Melrose 

FITZGIBBONS, HELEN M Boston 

FLACK, HELEN G Lowell 

FLEMING, JOSEPHINE Boston 

FLOOD, GENEVIEVE A Nashua, N. H. 

FORD', CHARLOTTE E Hanover, N. H. 

FOSTER, ESTHER Bayhead, N. J. 

FOSTER, L. HESTER Boston 

FOSTER, LAURA R Swampscott 

GAINES, BERTHA B Washington, D. C. 

GALLAGHER, S. ETHEL Newton 

GARDNER, AGNES H Dennysville, Maine 

GAREY, ETHEL H Thetford, Vt. 

GARLAND, GLADYS L Great Pond, Maine 

GATES, LILLIAN H Machias, Maine 

GATES, RUTH D Amherst 

GAVIN, MADELINE R Boston 

GERALD, LOUISE W Canton 

GILLIES. ELIZABETH Wakefield, R. I. 

GILLIS, CLARICE E N. Haven, Maine 

HADLEY, GLADYS J Newton 

HAMBLETT, MARY S Nashua, N. H. 

HAMILTON, DOROTHY M New Haven, Conn. 

FIARPER, MILDRED P Great Barrington 

HATCH, MARY E Newton 

HAWLEY, ESTHER G . B.rookline 

HAYDEN, BEULA L. Rutherford, N. J. 

HODGES, MILDRED E Maiden 

HOLMES, MARGARET Kingston 

HOOPER, MARGUERITE Castine, Maine 

IIOYT, INEZ W Franklin, N. H. 

HUGHES, CORA E Rockford, 111. 

JACOBS, E. PAULINE Boston 

JACOBS, HELEN G Boston 

JEWETT, MARION W Reading 

JOCHUM, JULIA T Marion, 111. 

JONES, DOROTHY E Buffalo, N. Y. 

JONES, DOROTHY M Catskill, N. Y. 

JONES, ELEANOR Watertown 

JORDAN, ESTHER M Peabody 

KARLOWA, CAROLYN H Davenport, la. 

KEARN, ALICE J Northampton 

KELLEY, FRANCES A N. Adams 

KELSEY, AGNES S Troy, N. Y. 

KENDALL, MARGARET E Concord, N. H. 

KINGSLEY, MADELEINE D S. Berwick, Maine 

KLEIN, ALICE M Boston 

106 



Name. Home. 

KNIGHT. THELMA I Somerville 

KNOWLTON, MARY C Medford 

LAKE, MIRIAM G ~- Buffalo, N. Y. 

LAWRENCE. RHODA B Peekskill, N. Y. 

LAWRENCE, RUTH H Whitman 

LEIGH TON, MARJORIE S Manchester, N. H. 

LENIHAN, MARGARET P Boston 

LEONARD, HARRIET Birookline 

McAULIFFE. MARY C Worcester 

McCULLOCH, HELEN W Pawtucket, R. I. 

MacDONALD, J. CLAIRE Watertown 

MACGOWAN, MARGARET Tilton, N. H. 

McINTIRE. MARY M Salem 

MACKIE, DOROTHY Bradford, Pa. 

McMANMON, KATHARINE G Lowell 

MANDELSTAM, RAE Boston 

MANN, MIRIAM L Everett Pa 

MARSH, HAZLE H Somerville 

MAYO, SARAH W Bridgewater 

MELOON, IVY C Medford 

MERRIAM, HELEN E Springfield 

MESERVE. RACHEL T Boston 

MILLS, VERTA I Lynn 

MOIR. GRACE E Arlington 

MONROE. ELEANOR D Boston 

MORAN, ANNA C Milton 

MYRON. CLAIRE P Lynn 

NICKERSON, PRISCILLA Foxborough 

O'CONNOR, MARGARET E Wakefield 

O'NEIL, GERTRUDE E Boston 

PAGE, SARAH C Richmond, Maine 

PARSONS, BERITH Takoma Park, Md. 

PAYSON, HAZEL A Stoneham 

PAYSON. RACHAEL A Augusta, Maine 

PERRY, ELEANOR W Weston 

POTTER, LYDIA M Providence, R. I. 

POWELL, MILDRED Great Barrington 

RANDALL, MARY R Belmont 

RASER. MARGARET H Ashtabula, Ohio 

REILLY, ELINOR F Cambridge 

RICHARDS, RUTH Winthrop 

RIEGER. ELSIE L Reading, Pa. 

ROBERTS. RUTH E Gorham, Maine 

ROBERTSON, MARION E Worcester 

ROCKWOOD. MARJORIE R Hopedale 

ROWEN. MADELINE M Boston 

RUSSELL. RUTH E E. Middlebury, Vt. 

RUST. J. HESTER Manchester 

SAMPSON, E. ELIZABETH Framingham 

SANDS. GLADYS F Newton 

SAWIN, OLIVE Southborough 

SCOTT. MARIAN A Gloversville, N. Y. 

SERVIS, OLIVE E Melrose 

SEYMOUR, EDITH K Belmont 

SHELLEY, KATHERINE M Albany, N. Y. 

SHERMAN, ELIZABETH P Boston 

107 



Name. Home. 

SIBLEY, MILDRED Birmingham, Mich. 

SILVER, ANNA K Dalton 

SKINNER. THEODOSIA F. - Watertown 

SMITH, ISABELLE C Moscow, Vt. 

SODEN, FLORENCE J Cohoes, N. Y. 

SOROKER, SIBYL Boston 

SPENCER, ELEANOR M Boston 

STARBUCK, ISABELLA F Cambridge 

STERN, SELMA Berlin, N. H. 

STORM, CECELIA A Pompton Lakes, N. J. 

STRAUSS, MARCIA M Boston 

STRONG, ELEANOR M Pittsfield 

SWANTON. HELEN F . Andover 

SVVEETSER, ANNA M Worcester 

TABOR, MARION E. Haverhill 

TALBOT, ELIZABETH A Somerville 

TANDY, MARY Vevay, Ind. 

THOMPSON, SARAH W Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 

THROSSELL, MARJORIE Cleveland, Ohio 

TIBBETTS, HELENA AM Boston 

TIMMERMAN, HAZEL B Amsterdam, N. Y. 

TRAVIS, JESSIE C Lynn 

WADSWORTH. MILDRED W Southborough 

WAKEFIELD, KATHARINE E Newton 

WARD, JULIA M Brookline 

WATERBURY, HELEN M Ballston Spa, N. Y. 

WEBER, HARRIET L Madison, Wis. 

WHEELER, MARGARET L Cambridge 

WHITE, FLORENCE H Waterbury, Conn. 

WHITLOCK, HELEN I Calais, Maine 

WIENER, GLADYS I Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

WIGGIN, MARGARET Natick 

WIGHT, GENEVA A Natick 

WILLARD, GERTRUDE M Somerville 

WILLIAMS, ESTHER L Boston 

WILSON, GERTRUDE New Bedford 

WISWALL, ELLA F Weston 

WOLFF, ESTELLE M New York, N. Y. 

YESNER, SOPHIE M Boston 

ZEHRINGER, VICTORIA J Winthrop 




108 




Anna Stolzenbach 
Vice-President 



©ffwra 

Catherine Tyler 
President 



Ruth Mitchell 
Treasure) 



Rae Finsterwald 

Secretary 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 



Priscilla Bunten 
Jean Butterworth 



Eunice Clarke 
Mary Klein 



Class Color: Green 




111 



QIlasB of 1013 



Name. Home. 

ADAMS, LYDIA A ... Bangor, Me. 

ALCOTT, MARION D Everett 

ALLISON, ELLA C Boston 

ALLSTON, HENRIETTA K Saugus 

ANDERSON, MARTHA Norwich, Conn. 

ANDREWS, EMMA M Richmond, Me. 

ANDREWS, RUTH L Stafford, Conn. 

AVERY, PAULINE M Laconia, N. H. 

AYER, HELEN P Portland, Me. 

BAILEY, RUTH D Wiscasset, Me. 

BAKER, DOROTHEA E Jamestown, N. Y. 

BAKER, HELEN M Kansas City, Mo. 

BAMBERG, DOROTHY C .... Boston 

BARNES, RUTH L Stoneham 

BASTIAN, MYRTLE R. . Allentown, Pa. 

BATCHELDER, MARION F Brook-field, Vt. 

BLANCHARD, HELEN W Montpelier, Vt. 

BOOTHBY, HELEN E .... Augusta, Me. 

BRAMSON, ROSE F Worcester 

BREWSTER, ADA Andover 

BRIGGS, ESTHER B Medford 

BRIGHAM, BEATRICE M Fitchburg 

BRITTAIN, HARRIETT A Somerville 

BROGAN, FLORENCE B Buffalo, N. Y. 

BROWN, CHRISTINE P Poquonock, Conn. 

BUCKLEY, MARION C Boston 

BUNTIN, PRISCILLA Newton 

BUSHELL, C. GRACE Springfield 

BUTTERWORTH, JEANNE Hopedale 

CAMPBELL, ANNE Needham 

CARR, LENA F Bradford, N. H. 

CASTLEMAN, BLANCHE .... Rochester, N. Y. 

CATON, ELEANOR R Boston 

CHAPMAN, RUTH Woodfords, Me. 

CLARK, ELIZABETH M Weymouth 

CLARK, EUNICE S Newton 

CLARK, LOUISE Abington 

CLOGSTON, GRACE M Boston 

CLOSE, AGNES H Greenwich, Conn. 

COBURN, MARY Boston 

COGGESHALL, DOROTHY Melrose 

COHEN, REBECCA Boston 

COUGHLIN, ELSIE M Boston 

COVERLY, ELEANOR V Trov, N. Y. 

CROSS, ELEANOR E Portland, Me. 

CROWELL, FLORENCE Quincy 

CUNNINGHAM, J. MABEL Atlanta, Ga. 

DANIELS, MARGARET E Brooklinc 

DAVIDSON, EDITH M Stow 

DAWLEY, LENA B Norwich, Conn. 

DeMOTT, HAZEL A Madison, N. J. 

DePUGH, HELEN M Yonkers, N. V. 

DOHERTY, EVELYN M Boslnn 

DONALDSON, MILDRED J Chicago 111 

DOUTHIT, ALISON McG Petersham 

DOWNING. BERNICE P. Laconia, N I I 

DRUMMOND, HILDEGARD V . Waterville, Me. 

11-' 



_ Name. Home. 

DuBOIS, KATHERINE R New Paltz, N. Y. 

DUBOIS, MARY E Lynn 

DUCKHAM. GLADYS M Madison, N. J. 

DUFF, SUSTE L Arlington 

DUNKS, ABBIE E Worcester 

DUNN. ISABEL L Exeter, N. H. 

EBERHARDT, KATHARINE Aldington 

EMERY. BEATRICE A Bar Harbor, Me. 

ENSWORTH, EULA E. . . Worcester 

EVERETT, IRENE Boston 

FAUCETT, ETHEL M Glenbrook, Conn. 

FELKER. MILDRED A Nashua, N. H. 

FINKELSTEIN, CELIA Keene, N. H. 

FINSTERWALD, RAE Detroit, Midi. 

FISHER, MARIE E Washington, D. C. 

FLEMMING, OLIVE M Cambridge 

FOWLER, HELEN Plymouth 

FRANKLIN. MARY N Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

FRUMSON, RUTH G Boston 

GARRITY, BEATRICE E Newton 

GASS, ELIZABETH ■ ■ . . Sheffield, Pa. 

GEORGE, CLARA B Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

GORDON, MILDRED E Providence, R. I. 

GRAHAM, MARY E Lancaster, Pa. 

GRAUERT, HELEN E Rutherford, N. J. 

GRIFFIN. ALICE H ■ Portsmouth, N. H. 

GRIMES, ELIZABETH P Nantucket 

GUPPEY, LILLIS M Salmon Falls, N. H. 

GUPPEY, RID'IE L Salmon Falls, N. H. 

HARRIGAN, MARY C ■....' Boston 

HEFFLON. ANNE Winchester 

HENDERSON. CAROLYN E Middleton 

HENNIG. RUTH M. E Boston 

HITCHCOCK, MILDRED E Medway 

HODGES, AUGUSTA R Mansfield 

HOLMES, MARION F Rochester, N. H. 

HOLT, ELIZABETH M - New Bedford 

HOWARD, ELIZABETH Melrose 

HOWELL, MARION Stoneham 

HUNTER, CARITA B Somerville 

HUPPER, HELEN M Lynn 

JONES, CARRIE M Lakeport, N. H. 

KELIHER, ESTHER G. . . . -. Boston 

KELLY, RUTH R Boston 

KILLELEA, GERALDINE C " : . Leominster 

KIMBALL, ALICE M Bethel, Me. 

KLEIN. MARY A Boston 

KNEIL, CAROLINE M Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

RUMMER. GLADYS Cleveland, O. 

LADD. MOLLY L Epping, N. H. 

LAMKIN, MIRIAM R Belmont 

LANE. BEATRICE F Lynn 

LAWRENCE, MADELINE H. S. Hadlev 

LAWRENCE. MARION Wakefield 

LEARY. LOUISE C Maiden 

LEAVITT. ELIZABETH ... Chicago, 111. 

LEMAY. JULIETTE Marlborough 

LINAHAN, AGNES M Newton 

LINCOLN, ELLA M Glens Falls, N. Y. 

113 



Name. Home. 

LIPMAN, REBECCA E Lynn 

LITCHFIELD, CATHERINE . New Rochelle, N. Y. 

LOCKE, JUDITH M ' Winchester, N. H. 

LOWE, MADELEINE E Boston 

LYO'NS, MARION G Newton 

McCANN, MARION F '. Boston 

MCCARTHY, GERTRUDE M Ayer 

MacCONNELL, EDITH B Boston 

McKEE, HAZEL C Haverhill 

McKISSICK, DOROTHY Boston 

MacLEOD, FLORENCE L Brooklyn, N. Y. 

McNEIL, EVELYN A Stoughton 

MARBLE, GLADYS W E. Bridgewater 

MASON, ADELAIDE F Pawlet, Vt. 

MAXWELL, BERNICE M Melrose 

MEEHAN, MARY G Newton 

MITCHELL, RUTH Brookline 

MOORE, ALICE E Ashburnham 

MOORE, ERNESTINE D . . W. Lebanon, N. H. 

MORIARTY. MARGARET E Boston 

MORRILL, RUTH E Saco, Me. 

MOSHIER, L. MARION Utica, N. Y. 

MOWER, GERTRUDE E Augusta, Me. 

MURPHY, HELEN J Boston 

MUTH, ELEANOR E Lititz, Pa. 

NEFF, GERTRUDE Salem 

NICHOLS, HOPE Everett 

NICOLL, FLORENCE M Boston 

NOERA, HAZEL H Boston 

NORRIS, CAROLINE F Melrose 

NUTTER, DORIS Woodsville, N. H. 

O'BRIEN, ELEANOR L Williamstown 

O'CONNOR, ALICE K Holyoke 

ORTH, CATHERINE E Steelton, Pa. 

PAINE, JANET E Warwick, R. I. 

PENDLETON, JESSICA E. . . Norwich, Conn. 

PERKINS, VERA A Rutland, Vt. 

PFUND, MARION C Boston 

PICKLES, MARGARET L Somerville 

PIPER, MARJORIE B Milton 

POIRIER, MARIE A Salem 

PORTER, HELEN M Canton 

POULIN, FLORA Farmington, Me. 

PRESCOTT, KATHERINE Stoneham 

PULSIFER, HELEN E Natick 

QUIMBY, MARION E Beverly 

QUINLAN, ROSEMARY S Natick 

RABINOVITZ, NELLIE Boston 

RAMIREZ, MARIA P Porto Rico 

RAND. DOROTHY Abington 

RANDALL, BARBARA Wakefield 

REEVES, BEATRICE A Attleborough 

REYNOLDS, ALICE Cant'..,, 

RICE, ALICE E Somerville 

RICHARDS, GLADYS L Lynnfield 

ROCK, KATHARINE H Swampscott 

ROUNDY, SUSAN Worcester 

ROWE, ERNESTINE Cleveland 

RUSSELL, MARY E Exeter, N. 11. 

114 



Name. Home. 

RYAN. MARGARET M Stoughton 

SANBORN, RUTH A Cambridge 

SAWYER, HARRIOT B - Boston 

SAWYER. MARY N Palmyra, N. Y. 

SCHONFIELD, BELLE W T Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

SCULLEY, MARGARET A Hamilton 

SEGEL, FLORA E Melrose 

SEW ALL, H. SYDNEY Old Town, Me. 

SEXTON, VERA A Fitcbburg 

SEYBOLT, LOIS A Portsmouth, N. H. 

SHAW, CHARLOTTE W Lancaster, Pa. 

SHAW, MARGARET M Boston 

SHERBURNE, RUTH E Tyngsborough 

SHUTE, MARION Uxbridge 

SINCLAIR, MARION Boston 

SISKIND', GLADYS Lawrence 

SMITH, MARION C Waltham 

SOMMER, HELEN E Lakewood. O. 

SPAMER, MARION P Oronoque, Conn. 

SPENCER, EUNICE H W. Haven, Conn. 

SPURNEY, ALBERTA G Cleveland, O. 

STACEY, HELEN R White River Junction, Vt. 

STARBUCK, KATHARINE R Lancaster 

STEARNS, HELEN Salem 

STEVENS, RUTH M Boston 

STINSON, R. GENEVA E. Surry, Me. 

STOLZENBACH, ANNA K Sewicklev, Pa. 

STONE, ESTHER M Boston 

STORM, GEORGIA S Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

SUMMERS, GRACE B ' Walpole 

SVENSON, TILLY E Boston 

SWEENEY, JOSEPHINE Exeter, N. H. 

SWIFT, EDITH E Milton 

SYLVESTER, MARGARET J Haverhill 

THOMPSON, DORENE Orange 

TOBIN. DOROTHY E Everett 

TOURTELLOTTE, L. FRANCES Marlborough 

TOWSLEY, JEAN L Toledo, O. 

TURNER, EVA E • S. Berwick, Me. 

TYLER, CATHERINE Newton 

WALDEN, VIOLA S Williamstown 

WALDRON, ANNE M Brookline 

WALLIN, ORCELIA E Grand Rapids, Mich. 

WALLIS, EVELYN M Olean, N. Y. 

WALSH, ANNA L Randolph 

WATSON, DELLA M Toledo, O. 

WEINBERG. FLORENCE Newton 

WELLS, RUTH C Lynn 

WETHERELL, GLADYS A Natick 

WHEELER, DORIS M Greenville, N. H. 

WHITE, RUTH L Taunton 

WILLIAMSON, EMMA M Frankfort, N. Y. 

WILSON. BETH Medway 

WILSON, CAROLINE H New Bedford 

WINCHESTER, EDITH M Webster 

WOOD, ELIZABETH G Concord, N. H. 

WRIGHT, ALICE L Melrose 

ZIRNGIEBEL, JESSIE E Needham 

115 



Agnes Taylor 
Vice-President 




(§tCxcns 

Margaret Gooch 
President 



Helen Walters 
Treasurer 



Barbara Keith 
Secretary 



Madge Hovey 
Representative at Committee of Student Conduct 

Ethelwyn Manning 
Representative at Student Government Council 



118 



Name. Home. 

ARNOLD, RUTH H Chicago, 111. 

AVER, ELIZABETH ' . Boston 

BABSON, ELINOR Boston 

BALDWIN, DOROTHY A Cambridge 

BARRY. MARGARET L Newton 

BARSS, MARGARET F Rochester, N. Y. 

BARTON, HELEN M Cambridge 

BARTON, LAURA F Buffalo, N. Y. 

BARUS. DEBORAH H Providence, R. I. 

BELL, JULIA B Long Lake, Minn. 

BLACKSH1RE. DEANE Pangburn, Ark. 

BOLLES. BARBARA M Welles'ley 

BOYDEN, ALICE G Newton 

BRADFIELD, HELEN C Grand Rapids, Mich. 

BRADFORD, RUTH Boxford 

BRAMHALL, OLIVE K . . . ' Holden 

BRENNAN, ROSEMARY A Bangor, Me. 

BREWER, EDA M Cortland, N. Y. 

BURRAGE, MARY U Newton 

BURROUGHS, VIVIAN Danielson, Conn. 

CAMPBELL, MARGARET G Needham 

CASS, VERA C Viroqua, Wis. 

CLAPP, DOROTHEA Boston 

CLARK, OLIVE L Bozeman, Mont. 

COHEN, MABEL G Somerville 

CONE, ALICE W Hartford, Conn. 

COX, EMELINE B Brookline 

CRAIGIE, ANNIE L "Rochester, N. Y. 

CRANDALL. H. RUTH Palo Alto, Cal. 

DANA, JOSEPHINE E N. Pomfret, Vt. 

DAVIDSON, ETHEL M Canandaigua, N. Y. 

DAVIES, ANNE M Holyoke 

DAVIS, BERTHA E Madison, Wis. 

DAVIS, DOROTHY S Northampton 

DAWSON, MARGARET Winthrop 

EVARTS, CHRISTINE E Somerville 

EWING, MURIEL Newton 

FANNING, ELIZABETH L Hingham 

FOYE, MILDRED E Worcester 

GAGE. HARRIET ' Evanston, 111. 

GALBRAITH, MARY C Arlington 

GALLAGHER, ELIZABETH F Boston 

GIFFORD, HELEN W New Bedford 

GOOCH, MARGARET C Watertown 

GRAVES, MARION E Northampton 

GRAY, EDNA R Minneapolis, Minn. 

GREEN, HELEN L Manhattan, Kan. 

GRINNELL, RUTH A Grand Rapids, Mich. 

HEATH, HELEN C Concord, N. H. 

HODGE, MARY L Winchester 

HOLMSTROM, MYRTLE Joliet, III. 

HOVEY, MADGE Winchester 

HOYLE, LOUISE B Norwood 

HULING, ALICE B Cambridge 

119 



Name. 



Home. 



IVES, MARY P Meriden, Conn. 

JOHNSON, ADA M Wolfville, N. S. 

JUDD, MARTHA B . . . . W. Hartford, Conn. 

KEITH, BARBARA ' Newton 

KINGSBURY, ESTHER W Holliston 

LACEY, ELISABETH V Cheyenne, Wyo. 

LACEY, LOUISE F Cheyenne, Wyo. 

McLOUGHLIN, CATHARINE A Worcester 

MANNING, ETHELWYN . Newton 

MOIR, AGNES P Minneapolis, Minn. 

NASH, RUTH S Cambridge 

NESMITH, H. LOUISE Lowell 

NEWMAN, MINETTE D Cambridge 

NORTON, DORA M Gardiner, Me. 

OTTO, MARGARETHA E Marietta, O. 

PARKER, MARION Orleans 

PECK. DOROTHY R. . . Boston 

PEIRCE, PAULINE Worcester 

PRESCOTT, HELEN W Newton 

PRUDDEN, ELINOR Brookline 

RAYMOND, MARY M ' . . Wolfville, N. S. 

REID, FLORENCE M . Cleveland, O. 

ROWE, ALICE T Brookline 

RUNSER, HELEN E Erie, Pa. 

RUSSELL, GRACE L Skowhegan, Me. 

RUSSELL, HELEN A Ilion, N. Y. 

SAWYER, JENNIE M Bath, Me. 

SCARF, JOICE C Grand Forks, N. D. 

SHAW, GERTRUDE, M Cambridge 

SHELDON, ELIZABETH M Milton 

STEVENS, RUTH H Newton 

SWIFT, EDITH T Newton 

TAYLOR, AGNES W. Chester, Pa. 

THOM, LOIS M ... Appleton, Wis. 

THORPE, HAZEL Detroit, Mich. 

WALLER, OLGA L Kewanee, 111. 

WALTERS, HELEN M Wyoming, 111. 

WARREN, MARJORY C Boston 

WEATHERILL, EDITH II Arlington 

WEEKS, MARY Boston 

WHITNEY, CAROLINE G Melrose 

WIGMORE, ETHEL G. . : St. John, N. B. 

WOMBOUGH, JENNIE R Hornell, N. Y. 




120 



Httrkaatfafc ^tttbpnts 



The following list includes students admitted under special conditions to pursue prescribed 

programmes. 

Name. Home. 

ALDRICH. MARION A Boston 

ALEXANDRAKIS, ANASTASTA Cambridge 

APPELT, IDA B Webster 

BARISH, GERTRUDE Boston 

BONNEY, ETHEL Scituate 

BOYNTON, HELEN E Norwich, Conn. 

BRADBURY. GLADYS O Providence, R. I. 

BROWN, MARGARET Angels, Pa. 

BURDAK1N, LILLIAN Dedham 

CAHILL. MARTHA M Boston 

CARRANZA, CONCEPCION G Mexico 

CHARLTON, MARY E Marlborough 

DODGE, JESSIE A '-.... Boston 

DRESSEL. MILDRED H Lynn 

DUXMORE. DELLA Utica, N. Y. 

ELLIOTT, ESTHER J Newton 

EMERY. FLORENCE M Lancaster 

FERGUSON, ANNA E Dayton, O. 

FISHER, H. LUTHERA St. Albans, Vt 

FISK, PAULINE Brattleboro, Vt. 

FLEMING, LOUISA H Quincy 

FLYNN, JOSEPHINE A Swampscott 

FOWLER, ELVA M Jefferson City, Mo. 

FRANZ, GERTRUDE Holyoke 

FREEMAN. CARRIE M Brookfield, N. S. 

FRENCH, MARION E Deep River, Conn. 

GILLMOR, JULIA Calais, Maine 

GOODWIN, CAROLYN M Worcester 

GROSE, INEZ B Stratton, Maine 

HADLEY, RUTH M Bellows Falls, Vt. 

HALL. KATHARINE M N. Adams 

HAUGHENBERRY, CHLOE A Coudersport, Pa. 

HISKEY, MARIAN L Salt Lake City, Utah 

HOUSER, ALMA M Berlin Heights, O. 

KELSEY, CHRISTINE W. Hartford, Conn. 

KENNEDY, ORA L Lewiston, Idaho 

KNIGHTLY. LORETTA A Amherst 

LANE, HELEN L St. Louis, Mo. 

LYNN, DOROTHY M Rochester, N. Y. 

McCARNES, MABEL F Slippery Rock, Pa. 

McEWAX. MIRIAM E W. Hoboken, N. J. 

McKERROW, MARJORIE M Newton 

McLEAX, HELEN E Brooklinc 

McLEOD, LILLA E ... Brewer, Maine 

MOIR, H. EDNA Newton 

MULCASTER, ANNE M Philadelphia, Pa. 

MUNGER. ROSA A Cleveland, O. 

MURPHY, MARY G Boston 

NEWELL, MILDRED F Holden 

NOWELL, EDITH M Melrose 

121 



Name. Home. 

O'CONNELL, ELIZABETH Pittsfield 

POLLYCUTT, HELEN T. P Stoughton 

POND, MARGARET Boston 

PRAY, BEATRICE I Boston 

RANDALL, STELLA I Holyoke 

REH, LUCILE E Toledo, O. 

ROBERTS, AMY L Ossining, N. Y. 

SMITH, SARAH S St. Louis, Mo. 

STINSON, ANNA D Needham 

TOWLE, OLIVE E Walpole 

WALLACE, SYLVIA P - Pasadena, Cal. 

WARE, SALLIE E Bangor, Maine 

WILLETT, HARRIETT Needham 

WINSLOW, EDNA M Meriden, Conn. 

WYPER, MARION J Hartford, Conn. 



II 
The following list -includes students admitted to pursue irregular or partial programmes. 
Name. Home. 

ALDEN, ALICE A • . . Arlington 

ALVARADO, ERNESTINA M Mexico 

ANDERSON, AGNES L Boston 

ASHLEY, MILDRED P., A.B Deerfield 

BABCOCK, RUTH E., A.B. . . . Minneapolis, Minn. 

BAILEY, LOIS Newton 

BAKER, ELEANOR T Newton 

BLAKE, DOROTHY Melrose 

BRIDGMAN, MARJORIE, A.B. ... Salem 

BURNETT, EDAH F. St. Paul, Minn. 

CARROLL, FRANCES M Peabody 

CARVEL, MAE Los Angeles, Cal. 

CATON, MARION L Foxborough 

CHAPIN, RUTH P., A.B Perry, N. Y. 

CLOSE, FRANKIE A. . . . ' Seattle, Wash. 

COLSON, HELEN D. F Lawrence 

CUMMINGS, NELLIE F Peace Dale, R. I. 

DAVIDSON, CATHERINE F, A.B Canandaigua, N. Y. 

DYKE, EUNICE H Toronto, Ont. 

EDMANDS, M. LUELLA Saugus 

ELLIS, MARGARET, A.B Melrose 

ELMS, LAURA C Newton 

ELY, MARGARITA A Rochester, N. Y. 

ESSERY, LOUISE H Charlottetown, P. E. I. 

FEENEY, GRACE E Boston 

FENTON, HELEN B Springfield 

FOGG, MARION W Norwood 

FRENCH, ANITA H Medfield 

FURLEY, ALICE G., A.B Winthrop 

GINGRAS, BEATRICE E Lawrence 

GRANT, RUTH L., A.B Painesville, O. 

HEATH, LUCY R North, Va. 

HENDERSON, D. LOUISE Hingham 

HIRANO, CHIE Japan 

HOWARD, JESSIE M SomerviUe 

HOWE, JOSEPHINE R., A.B Glens Falls, N. Y. 

122 



Name. Home. 

HUDNUT. MURIEL New Bedford 

JENNINGS, MARY G ' Boston 

McCARTEN, TILLA, A.B Lancaster, N. Ii. 

MacHALE. ALICE J __ Boston 

McLANNAN, MARY N. Brookfield, N. S. 

MARSTON, MARGARET N. Andover 

MATSOUKI, MARIANTHI Greece 

MERRELL. JEANNETTE, A.B Cleveland, 0. 

MILLER, ANNA J., A.B Madison, Wis. 

MORRISON. REBECCA Louisville, Ky. 

NEWTON, ANJENNETTE, A.B Chatham 

O'MEARA. CATHERINE V Boston 

OSBORN, M. MARGUERITE, A.B Ithaca, N. Y. 

PARNELL. M. GRACE " . . . Boston 

PERISTIANO, EMILIE Greece 

POSNER, GERTRUDE A., A.B Newark, N. J. 

PRATT, KATHERINE S Boston 

PRIDDY, IRENE L., A.B Adrian, Mich. 

PROIOU, ARYERO Greece 

RAZT. ADELA Greece 

REED, RUTH S., A.B Whitman 

REID, MILDRED K Pansboro, N. S. 

REIGHARD, CATHERINE R, A.B Ann Arbor, Mich. 

REVERE, SUSAN T Canton 

RICHARDSON. ANGIE Salem 

ROBINSON, DORRICE C, A.B Bangor, Maine 

ROBINSON, GERTRUDE H Walpole 

ROWELL, ELLA C, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RUTLEDGE, AGNES P Cambridge 

RYAN, ALICE M Lynn 

SCOTT, ANNIE D Providence, R. I. 

SDRIN, HELEN N Greece 

SEARS, WILLARETTE C Worcester 

SHEPHERD, MARION Cambridge 

SIMMS, RUTH H Gorham, Maine 

SIMONDS, MARGARET Bedford 

SMITH, ELIZABETH A. E Philadelphia, Pa. 

SPALDING, CAROLINE, A.B Lowell 

STEVENS, MARGARET Boston 

STRAIT. HELEN F., A.B Montclair, N. J. 

TARBELL, OLGA S., A.B .' ... Los Angeles, Cal. 

TRAINUM, ELIZABETH H Richmond, Va. 

TYMOX, MARGARET M Boston 

VARNEY, HELEN M Newburyport 

VELA GONZALEZ, PAULA Mexico 

VIGGARS, EDITH Cambridge 

WALTON, A. GRACE Toledo, O. 

WARE, ADELINE M, S.B Maiden 

WARNER, GRACE E St. Paul, Minn. 

WHEELER, MARJORY, A.B Wellesley 

WILCOX, LOUISE M Grand Rapids, Mich. 

WILLIAMS, ELEANOR W Brookline 

WOLCOTT, MARY J Arlington 

WRIGHT, M. EUNICE Boston 

YERKES, R. ERMINIE, S.B Romulus, N. Y. 

YOUNG. FLORA T., B.L Cleveland, O. 

ZERVOS, ANNA C Greece 

123 



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This year has begun the life history of a new organization; new, not 
in name, but in its organization and governing powers. The Student Body 
as a whole now forms a working Student Government Association which 
includes every girl in college by including in its membership all working 
organizations, and on its Executive Council the Presidents and Vice-Presi- 
dents of the four classes ; the Presidents of all Associations and representa- 
tives from the college graduates; the unclassified students, and the Honor 
system, and Endowment Fund committees. 

The first president of this new organization, which takes the place 
of the former Guild, was elected in May, 19 15, and she, with the Executive 
Council, attempt to execute, rather than legislate, for the Association as 
a whole. As yet we are but in our first year's infancy, and we cannot expect 
the first experimental year to accomplish what self-government in its true 
sense means. What honor and responsibility may mean to us and to the 
college depends not only on those who go out this year, and have gone out 
before, but also on 19 17, 1 9 1 8, 191 9, and the long line of classes yet to 
come after us. 




127 



Sormttflry ii>artmtt (gnuernmrnt ©fltea 




E. MILLER, Secretary. 

M. BOUVE, President, 



M. SCOTT, Treasurer. 

M. DOTEN, Vice-President 



128 



iormitorij &tafrnt (Umirrnmntt 

Not only has our name grown bigger this year, but the spirit of our 
organization has grown also. That is, we are not only realizing to the 
full the meaning of Student Government but we are now, more than ever 
before, living up to its standards. 

Of course, Dormitory Student Government is only one of the branches 
of Student Government, but we feel we are a very important branch, since 
we include every girl living in our fifteen buildings. That means we have 
charge of practically four hundred girls. But when each one of these 
girls attends to her own government, and that is what Student Government 
means, the responsibility and actual work of the Council, our legislative 
body, is not heavy. At times there have been anxious moments, and we 
have doubted the wisdom of our creed. But this very doubting and the 
fact that we have questioned are two factors that have brought about 
greater unity and cooperation in all our activity. Of course, there is 
vet a wide difference between our ideal and our achievement, and of course 
there always will be; but we are proud of the advance we have taken 
this year. 




129 



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In a college established essentially for specialized study, the tendency 
of every factor is toward specificity of purpose and action. This tendency 
has made itself felt in no small degree on the extra-curriculum student 
activities so that, when the Simmons Y.W.C.A. was established at a some- 
what later date than the other big student organizations, its primary 
purpose — "to deepen the Christ life within the college" — bade well to be 
its sole purpose, and the weekly meetings of common worship, its sole 
means of expression, because the other organizations had already taken 
into themselves all such matters as were under student control. But with 
expression came expansion. Besides the weekly meetings there have been 
this year three Bible study classes and a Mission Study class. A card 
census of the student body was compiled by the Association; a directory 
bulletin of meetings and lectures posted weekly; informal teas served during 
the registration and examination periods ; an offering, collected at the Christ- 
mas Miracle play sent for the relief of foreign students ; dramatic readings 
of Oriental life and a sale of Simmons' Calendars for the Silver Bay fund; 
and there is hope of its being possible to send $50 toward the support of 
Dr. Grenfell's work. 

This is merely a brief statistical survey of the year's work intended to 
show in part the scope of the Association. It shows nothing of the spirit. 
This is practically impossible. Each individual must form for herself her 
own ideal of the Christ-like life. The Christian Association is here to 
strengthen that foundation, to offer it such means of expression and expan- 
sion that the Christ life may be deepened in the college through each and 
every individual. 

There were sixteen Silver Bay delegates last year who have done a 
great deal for this year's activities. Can't twenty-five go this spring and 
do more for the coming year? 




131 



iramattr AaHnriatmtt (iflfcerB 




M. ROGERS, Secretary 

E. JACOBI, President 



H. CORNISH, Treasurer B. KNOWLES, 

Chairman Dramatic Committee 



M. DOTEN, Vice-President 



132 



Sramattr AaBDriatum 

"The play's the thing." 

19 1 6 has one big thing to be remembered for — the Dramatic Club. 
In the years to come, the Dramatic Club will be an old, established institu- 
tion. If it then occurs to anyone that it had a beginning, that beginning will 
seem very vague, back in the past somewhere, but to those of us who are 
leaving, to those of us who have just come, and to those of us who are 
midway, the beginning of the Dramatic Club will always be very real and 
near. 

There is always a joy in doing things together, and there is always 
experience in working together. Cooperation and social pleasure are found 
in the Dramatic Club. For those who read, and those who have not yet 
read, there is an impetus to read plays both old and new, with the added 
chance for a happy discussion of your reading with others. The Club 
offers a chance for individual expression as nothing else at Simmons does, 
be it acting, staging, or costuming. The Dramatic Club is for all in the 
end, as in the beginning it is materializing from a desire of all. 



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Three years ago a Student Endowment Fund was started through 
which all money contributed by the students passed before being given 
to the College Endowment Fund. By this means interest and enthusiasm 
in behalf of new dormitories was aroused; and the students have found 
many ways of raising money. In June, 19 1 5, $4,426.63 had been given 
by the student body. Although there have been no large entertainments 
given this year for the Endowment Fund, because of present conditions, yet 
in many small ways money has been contributed which shows that the zeal 
and spirit for increasing the fund is not dormant. Through the sale of 
second-hand books, the Senior circus, the Darrach recitals, the selling of 
Christmas cards and candy, a total of $375 has been received by the 
Committee up to February first. It is hoped that this sum will be increased 
considerably by various entertainments to be given in the spring. On 
February 1, 19 1 6, $21,925 had been especially given for the Dormitory 
Construction Fund, to which the Student Fund goes. Through our bene- 
factor, Miss Helen Collamore, the college has received the sum of $100,000, 
the income of which is to be used for college purposes. 




135 



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Aside from our vocational training, the truest part of our college life 
comes from intimate contact with our college mates. Among the efforts 
to promote good fellowship in Simmons, the State Clubs play a large part. 
The intimacy between the old and new girls in the same state is felt even 
before the latter enter college. The new girl has a letter from a member 
of the club telling her she is already counted among their number. Then 
during the first days of college, she goes to a club tea, at which she meets 
a girl who knows friends of hers, another girl who comes from the same 
part of the state, and still another whom she saw on the train as she was 
coming to Boston. The world is really a small place after all, and home 
not so far away as it seemed at first. By theatre, sewing, and tobogganing 
parties, and bacon-bats, the bond of friendship is strengthened. Then 
comes a desire to help college through increasing the Endowment Fund 
so that our hopes for new dormitories may soon be realized. Besides en- 
larging our circle of friends while in college, the state clubs lead to a strong 
interest in alumnae organizations. This was one of the primary reasons 
for the founding of the clubs — to keep the graduates interested in their 
Alma Mater, to keep them ever active in promoting the welfare of Simmons. 
May it be truly said as the State Clubs develop that they are in as close a 
relation to the college as the states are to the Union. 

















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A little more than a year ago the first number of Persimmons was 
published. Members of the faculty, the Student Guild, and individual 
students combined their efforts to bring this mouthpiece of our college 
life into existence. It was intended to supply the lack of a mode of expres- 
sion that would reach every girl at Simmons. 

The first Board had a difficult task to perform. It had no precedents 
to follow and no publication of a similar college to .use as a guide. With 
an able editor-in-chief, a kind and intelligent group of advisers, and the 
enthusiastic support of the students Persimmons could not fail last year. 
The problem in September, however, was at once harder and easier. A 
start had been made, it is true, but at the same time, the interest always 
taken in a new enterprise was less keen, and the board was necessarily a 
different one. On the other hand the Alumna? have been generous in their 
support, advisers have continued their patient assistance, and the students 
have helped in every possible way. 

The magazine has many faults. It does not represent the college as 
a whole as inclusively as it should. It lacks a truly literary flavor. It is 
small in volume. But fortunately its faults are not of the kind without a 
remedy. They are, for the most part, the failings caused by its youth; 
they will disappear after a few years of determined effort on the part of the 
whole college to attain the high ideals above our grasp at the start. 




139 



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The 1916 Microcosm Board wishes to express its gratitude to its many 
friends, among the Faculty and students who have in any way aided in 
making their publication possible. 

The Microcosm has been issued annually for seven years. As our 
college changes and grows, the Microcosm, which is a voice of the college, 
changes also. Since we have had a college magazine, much of the material 
which was formerly published in the book seems to belong to the Persim- 
mons, so the contents of the Microcosm must necessarily be different. At 
present the Microcosm represents the college and is gotten out by the Senior 
class. It has been suggested that the Microcosm might be made a Senior 
book containing all the events of that class for its entire career in college. 
Each other class might get out an inexpensive paper-covered book each year, 
and combine these in the Senior book. The Microcosm Board might then 
be elected from those who had proved themselves capable by working on the 
underclass books. This is merely an idea which we leave to our successors 
to whom we extend our sincerest good will. 




141 



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Our gymnasium is so small that it practically debars spectators; con- 
sequently last year the match games were played out of doors in the 
spring. As usual the weather had something to say on the matter and the 
semi-finals were played between showers. 19 17 and 1918 lost in the semi- 
finals. During halves of the finals they played an informal match game 
which was Avon by 191 8; score, 25 to 16. The finals between 19 15 and 
1916 ended with the score 27 to 15 in favor of 1 9 1 5. Therefore the 
basketball cup went to 191 5. 

On May 8 the track walk was contested. Last year the walk was 
a relay. This did not require so much endurance and was even more 
exciting than the usual race. Gertrude Hussey, Hazel Cornish, Rachel 
Drinker, Marian Wheeler, and Ruth Hammond won for 1916: time, 59 
minutes 36 seconds. Edith Seymore, Frances Elwell, Alice Klein, Edith 
Dunn, Priscilla Bancroft, 191 8; Marion Titcomb, Louise Tingley, Edith 
Johnston, Margaret Hogan, and Lillian Logan, 1 9 1 5 ; Frances Dittmer, 
Ernestine Packard, Helen Gillette, Marion Bowman, and Margaret Holmes, 
19 1 7, won their W's. 

Field day was the best ever. Never in the history of Simmons have 
there been so many people out, or so many people participating. There 
was a new event, too, the javelin throw, which was a great success. There 
was a contest between classes for the best class song. The cup, given to the 
winner by the Athletic Association, was won by 1916. The words and 
music were both original. 

The last athletic event of the 1 914-19 15 season was tennis doubles, 
played on May 22. 1917 and 191 8 lost in the semi-finals. The finals were 
won by Olive Ruby and Margaret Sprague, 191 5. 1916 was represented 
by Mildred Bouve and Gertrude Hussey. The sport cup, given by the 
Alumni Association to the class winning the most points in all-round 
athletics — each contest counting, and second and third places bringing points 
as well as first places — was awarded to 19 16. 

Four individual cups were given for different sports. They were given 
with the cooperation of some of the men instructors, and they were coveted 
by mam/ an ardent athlete. The basketball cup was won by Harriet Put- 
nam; the track cup by Gertrude Hussey; and the tennis cups by Olive Ruby 
and Margaret Sprague. 

The season of 191 5-1 6 opened with fall tennis. All the games were 
very interesting this year especially the finals. Mildred Bouve, 19 16, and 
Marian Bathgate, 191 7, were defeated in the semi-finals. Mary Tandy, 

143 




1 9 1 8, and Anna Stolzenbach, 19 19, played in the finals. 1919 was vic- 
torious. Score: 6-5, 4-3, 6-1. Miss Margaret Dawson won in the post- 
graduate match. 

The interest was so centred in hockey this fall that very little was 
done for fall baseball practice. This year is the first in which we have 
been able to have hockey. A great many girls came out to practice. There 
were no formal games because so many girls had never played before that 
more experience was needed before we could have a fair match game. An 
informal game played between the Odds and Evens ended with one goal 
in favor of the Odds. Everyone was sorry when the weather put a stop 
to hockey practice although basketball practice began immediately. 



XX> 



iummnna Athlfltr Assortatton Pr^BtJipntH 



191 1 
1912 

i9!3 
1914 

1915 

1916 



Caroline E. Aldrich 
Caroline E. Aldrich 
Marion Donaldson 
Lillian F. Nisbet 
Harriet Putnam 
Marjorie Yates 



:do 



Wtixtna of % "§>" 

Gertrude Hussey, 191 6 
Marjorie Yates, 1916 
Mary Parker, 19 17 
Jessie McMullin, 19 17 
Anna Stolzenbach, 1919 



144 




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&immmtB ilitstral AHBonatton 

The Glee Club, Choir and Mandolin Club together compose the 
Simmons Musical Association, which has become a very successful 
organization. 

The Association owes a great deal to Miss Mabel Daniels not only for 
her work in training the Choir and Glee Club, but also for her part in 
preparing the programs for the concerts, which have given such prominence 
to the Glee and Mandolin Clubs. Miss Daniels has taken pains to have 
special music at the Chapel services on Wednesday afternoons, and the 
College seems well pleased with the results. 

Of course the Glee Club this year is the best Simmons has ever had. 
We are proud to say that Miss Daniels considers it well enough advanced 
this year to depend upon a student leader at the concerts instead of, as 
formerly, upon her. Last year the Club was so good that besides the 
two concerts in February, and that in June, we were permitted to give one 
in Dorchester. 

A great deal of the success of these concerts is due to the Mandolin 
Club. That, too, grows each year in numbers and ability. 



Uttsiral Aaaortaltnn QMtrprs 

President, Marjorie Soper 
Secretary and Treasurer, Frances Dittmer 



Glee Club 

Leader, Marjorie Soper, '16 
Manager, Julia Leamy, '16 



Mandolin Club 

Leader, Estelle Freeman, '16 
Manager, Margaret Pierce, '18 




147 




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E. RTCHARDSON M. YATES M. WHEELER E. LELAND 

G. HUSSEY, Captain 



150 



ORGANIZED SPORTS 

Tennis Counts 

First place, five points, won by 191^. 
Second place, three points, won by 1916. 

Basketball Counts 

First place, five points, won by 19 15. 

Second place, three points, shared by 1916 and 19 18. 



Relay Walk 



First place, five points, won by 19 16. 
Second place, three points, won by 191 8. 
Third place, one point, won by 19 17. 



Field Day 



First place, five points, won by 1916. 

Second place, three points, shared by 191 5 and 19 18. 

Third place, one point, won by 1 9 1 7. 

Tennis Doubles 

First place, five points, won by 19 15. 
Second place, three points, won by 19 16. 

Results : 

191 5 — 1 6 j'2 points 

1916 — 17J-2 points 

1 91 7 — 2 points 

1918 — 6 points 

Organized Sports Cup, presented by the Alumni Association, was won 
by 1 91 6. 



PRIZE SONG 

The Athletic Association awarded a cup to the class who won in the 
competition for the best Athletic Song sung at the meet. One judge was 
chosen by each class, and the Dean represented the Athletic Association. 
The Cup was won by 19 16. 

The Individual Track Cup was won by G. Hussey, 23 points. 

151 










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E. STRONG A. WALSH 

E. REILLY J. FLEMING, Captain I. MELOON 



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1319 Saakrtball 




H. NOERA C. TYLER R. SANBORN G. BUSHELL 

M. KLEIN, Captain 



155 




TENNIS 



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TENNIS SINGLES 

Mary Tandy, 18; Mildred Bouve, '16. Score: 6 — 4, o — 6, 6—2. 
Anna Stolzenbach, '19; Marian Bathgate, '17. Score: 6 — 3, 1 — 6, 6 — 1. 

Finals 
Anna Stolzenbach, '19; Mary Tandy, '18. Score: 6 — 5, 4 — 3, 6 — 1. 




156 




Officials 

Manager — Anita Allen, '15. 

Referee — Mr. Underwood. 

Judges — Mr. Mark, Mr. Goodell, Mr. Coombs. 

Official Score Keeper — Margaret Sprague, '15. 

Clerk of the Course- — Margaret Currier, '16. 

Marshal — Edith Stearns, '16. 



Entries 



1915 
Minott, G. 
Libby, M. 
Ray, A. 
Batcheller, M. 
Logan, L. 

1917 

Parker, M. 
Johnson, L. 
Sheldon, G. 



1916 

Drinker, R. 
Grant, M. 
Hammond, R. 
Hussey, G. 
Yates, M. 

1918 

Alger, S. 
Daland, G. 
Hayden, B. 
Leonard, H. 
McManmon, K. 
Meloon, I. 
Reilley, E. 
Rowen, M. 
Shelley, K. 
Waterbury, H. 




157 




FIELD DAY RESULTS 



66 ft. 



Running High Jump. Record: 4 ft. 

1. Wheeler, M., '16 

2. Minott, G., '15 

3. Rowan, M., '18 
Basketball Throw. Record 

1. Hussey, G., '16 
Libby, M., '15 
Shelley, K., '18 
Record: 27 ft 
McManmon, K., 
Johnson, L., '17 
Yates, M., '16 
Baseball Throw. Record 

1. Hussey, G., '16 

2. Daland, G., '18 

3. Grant, M., '16 

4. Shelley, K., '18 



2. 

3- 
Shot Put 
1. 

2. 

3- 



1 1 

'18 



8 in. Held by J. Blanchard, 
4 feet, 4/4 inches 
4 feet, 2 inches 
4 feet, 1 ,'/' inches 
1 1 in. Held by G. True, '12. 
65 feet, 3 inches 
58 feet, 3 inches 
56 feet, 3 inches 
in. Held by G. True, '12. 

27 feet, 7 inches 
25 feet, 8 inches 



163 ft. Held 



25 feet, 3 T 4 inches 
by G. Hussey, '16. 
160 feet, 3 inches 
147 feet, 9 inches 
144 feet, 11 inches 
140 feet, o inches 




12. 



158 




12 feet, io>4 inches 
12 feet, 9 inches 

Held by G. True, '12. 

7 feet, Yi 
6 feet, 11^2 
6 feet, 7 



inch 

inches 

inches 



Running Broad Jump. Record : 13 ft. 4^2 in. Held by M. Parker, '17. 

1. Hussey, G., '16 13 feet, 2>1 inches 

2. Parker, M., '17 

3. Minott, G., '15 

Standing Broad Jump. Record: 7 ft. 6 in. 

1. Minott, G., '15 

2. Hussey, G., '16 

3. Parker, M., '17 

Javelin Throw. 

1. Hussey, G., 16 50 

2. Shelley, K., '18 49 feet, 

3. Libby, M., '15 45 feet, 

First place in any event gives the winning class five points towards 
Field Day; second place, three points; third place, one point. 

Total Points 

1915— 13 
1 9 1 6 — 30 

191 7 — 6 

1918— 13 



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Ju Apjimiattmt of 1915 

Memories — how they come to us! 
After daylight fades to grey, 
Thoughts of many a happy hour 
Fraught with mingled work and play. 

Memories — All Life has to give, 
When she sweeps old friends along 
To serve others in her tasks. 
Still we keep our friendships strong. 

Memories — inspirations fine 

Ever shall we keep them green, 

They mean all the world to us, 

They mean "Friendship," dear Fifteen. 




i.!U» 



163 




(£flmm?nr?mpnt Wwk, 1915 

Sunday, June 13 
Baccalaureate Service in the Church of 
the Disciples, Jersey Street, at 4 o'clock. 
Sermon by the Reverend George Hodges, 
D.D., Dean of the Episcopal Theological 
School, Cambridge. 

Monday, June 14 
Senior Dance in South Hall (321 Brook- 
line Avenue) at 8 o'clock. 

Tuesday, June 15 

Class Day Exercises on the Dormitory 
Campus at 4 o'clock. 

Concert by the Glee and Mandolin 
Clubs; in South Hall at 8 o'clock. 

Glee Club Dance in South Hall at 10 
o'clock. 

Wednesday, June 16 

Commencement Exercises in the Har- 
vard Church, Coolidge Corner, Brookline, 
at 1 1 o'clock. Address by Professor Bliss 
Perry, L.H.D., LL.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity. 

Luncheon and Alee ting of the Alumnae 
Association in the College Building imme- 
diately after the Commencement Exer- 
cises. 

Reception by President Le favour to the 
Alumnae and their friends, in South Hall 
at 8 o'clock. 

Thursday, June 17 
Senior Luncheon in South Hall at 1 
o'clock. 



QHjitrrlj nf tljr Hisriplrs 

Sunday, June Thirteenth, 19 15 

Order of Worship 
Processional Hymn R. Heber 

Invocation 

The Twenty-third Psalm 
Anthem 

Scripture Lesson 
Prayer 
Hymn 
Baccalaureate Sermon 

The Reverend George Hodges, D.D. 
Dean of the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge 
Prayer and Benediction 
Recessional Hymn A. A. Proctor 



Mendelssohn 



J. G. Whittier 




166 



(&[n (EUtb (Eonrrrt 



i. Crescendo March 



2. On Music's Wing 



PROGRAM 

June 15, 191 5 

Mandolin Club 
Glee Club 



H. F. Odell 
Mendelssohn 



3. Duets: 

(a) Love, the Fair Day, (from the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam) 

Mabel W. Daniels 

(b) Who'll Buy My Lavender? Edward German 

Miss Marjorie Soper and Miss Beulah Knowles 

4. Cantasane Waltzes Odell 

Mandolin Club 

5. (a) Irish Love Song Margaret Ruthven Lang 
(b) Miss Nancy's Gown Chadwick 

(Introducing the Minuet from Don Giovanni, Mozart) 
Glee Club 



6. Solos : 

{a) Old English Pastoral 

{b) Chanson Indone 

(c) Norwegian Echo Seng 

Miss Phyllis Robbins 

7. Danse de Cupid 

Mandolin Club 



Carey 
N. Rimsky-Korsakof 



8. (a) In Fair Andalusia 

(Solo by Miss Elizabeth Kennison) 
(b) Grinds: 

1. Senior Grind — Past and Present. 

2. Questions a Simmons Girl must answer. 

Glee Club 

9. Alma Mater 



Odell 
Herbert-Sherwood 



Mildred Libby, '15, Accompanist to the Glee Club. 

167 



QllaHB lag 

June 15, 19 15 
PROGRAM 



Address of Welcome 



Winona Hyland 



2. Peace Pageant 

1. Art, Education, and Industry uniting the nations. 

2. Petty Quarrel; nations in attitude of defiance. Art, Industry, 

and Education withdrawn. 

3. War; Nations bow; Art, Industry, and Education veiled. 

4. Reign of Famine, Fire, Pestilence and Death. Art, Industry 

and Education prostrate. 

5. Hope revives Art, Industry, Education and the nations. 

6. Justice reunites the nations. Art, Industry, and Education 

flourish. 
Reign of Peace. 



3- 
4- 



7 



Ivy Dance 



Genevieve Crawley 



Step Songs 

Presentation of the Steps to the Class of 1916. 




168 



®Ij? (Unttlj (Emmtmtmnimt 

Wednesday, June 16, 191 5. 

ORDER OF EXERCISES 

Prayer The Reverend Ambrose White Vernon, D.D. 

Minister of the Harvard Church, Brookline. 
Commencement Hymn Gladden 

Address Bliss Perry, L.H.D., LL.D. 

Anthem, Veni Creator Spiritus 
Conferring of Degrees 
Award of Certificates 
College Hymn 
Benediction 

SENIOR LUNCHEON 

Toastmistress, Marian F. Cross 

Toasts 



Spiritual 
Material 
Literary 
Aesthetic 

Evolution 



Ellen S. Daniels 

Alice M. Ray 

Gladys L. Dixon 

Martha D. Ring 

Winona C. Hyland 




169 




170 




GAIETIES 



GEORGE WASHINGTON PARTY 

On the evening of February 19 the annual George Washington Party 
was given by Student Government in the Refectory. Although many of 
the girls had gone home for the week-end, a goodly number of Georges 
and Marthas were present, resplendent in all the finery of olden days. 

During the evening the audience's knowledge of the life of our first 
President was greatly augmented by the presentation of an original five- 
part film drama depicting "Scenes from the Life of George Washington." 
A special feature of this review was the delightful interpretation of the 
minuet given by Elizabeth Freeman and Katherine Shelley. So captivated 
were the judges by Miss Freeman's grace and beauty that the prize — a 
wonderful cherry pie, the artistic creation of our own chef — was awarded 
to her. 




172 



SOPHOMORE LUNCHEON 

On Saturday, March 13, 191 5, the Class of 19 17 enjoyed their 
Sophomore Luncheon. Miss Abby Partridge was toastmistress. The 
following spoke for the different schools: 



Library School 
Secretarial School 
Household Economics 
General Science 
A t hie tics 
Class of 19 1 7 



Gertrude Robinson 

Julia McCabe 

Jessie McMullin 

Louise Giblin 

Marion Craig 

Marion Doten 



was 



After the luncheon a one-act comedy, "A Shakespeare Wooing, 
given in North Hall. 

The committee in charge was : Eleanor Keith, Rose Furber, Gladys 
Donnelly, Helen Gillette, Dorothy Holmes. 




173 




SENIOR HOUSE PARTY 

House Party, 191 5 — Gloucester, April 16-20, 19 15. 
Chaperones — Miss Goodrich, Miss Bryant. 




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174 





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JUNIOR HOUSE PARTY 

House Party, 191 6 — Rockaway Inn, Clifton, April 17-20, 1915. 
Chaperones — Miss Louise Ufford, Miss Margaret Ridlon. 




175 




-J.Jt-'f-^.: 



SERENADE 



Dear old Sixteen, loyal, so true, 
Tho' far away, we'll still love you, 
Though stars grow dim and fade away 
Yet we'll love you forever and aye. 
Dear old Sixteen, loyal, so true, 
Our college days are growing few, 
With blinding tears, our eyes grow dim, 
Oh, don't forget us, old Nineteen Sixteen. 




Nineteen Fifteen — Dear Seniors, 

The Class we love so dearly, 

Your songs upon the breezes 

Are wafted to us clearly. 

Your spirit will hang o'er us, 

In all the years before us, 

But oh ! Your friendship, brave and true, 

Nineteen Fifteen, we sing to you. 



176 




JUNIOR PROM 



JUNIOR PROMENADE 

To be or not to be : that was the question that agitated the mind of 
every Junior when the words Junior Prom were heard. To many of us 
the idea of a Prom was unthinkable when so many thousands abroad were 
crying for aid. But after much discussion, it was decided to have a Prom 
but to keep it as simple as possible. Our efforts along this line but added 
to the enjoyment of the great night. We were all especially proud of the 
talent displayed by the decorating committee, for the Refectory and North 
and South Halls were worthy of the most experienced decorators. 

The Promenade was held on Friday evening, April 23. In the 
receiving line were : 

President Lefavour, Miss Walker, Miss Mary Eleanor Williams, Dr. 
and Mrs. Charles Marshall Underwood, Miss Sara Henry Stites, Miss 
Jeannie Scott Gloster, Dr. Eugene Lyman Porter, Miss Adela W. Adams, 
and Miss Gertrude Hussey, the President of the Class. 

The members of the Sophomore class who acted as ushers were : 
Marion Doten, Elizabeth Burbank, Anna Congdon, Elizabeth Hammond, 
Dorothy Van Orden, Lucy Gates, Eleanor Keith, Ruth Updegraff, Mabel 
Thompson, Stella Ellis, Ethel Dole, Dorothy Holmes, Margaret Gladwin, 
Lucy Nash, Jane Baumler, Jessie McMullin, Marion Driscoll, Louise 
Johnson, Alma Smith, Christine Ricker, Helen Harlow, Eleanor Barker. 



SOIREE 

On the evening following Prom, an informal dance was held in the 
Refectory. The dancing was preceded by Senior step singing, thus giving 
cur guests the opportunity of hearing some of the 1 9 1 5 Serenade songs. 



I7S 




MAY DAY 

On May Morning the Class of 191 7 aroused their sister class with a 
reveille and May songs rendered by a chorus of Grecian maids. Amid a 
throng of gay attendants and loyal followers Winona Hyland, President of 
the Senior Class, was escorted to her throne and with due ceremony was 
crowned Queen of the May. After this, she and her court were enter- 
tained by a rainbow May-pole dance and by a Spring dance, accompanied 
by the merry songs of the assembled Sophomores. At the close of the 
festivities the herald announced that breakfast was served and all joined 
in singing the praises of the "Good-rich" strawberry short-cake, which 
shortly appeared on the scene to the delight of everyone. 




179 





M 





r 



Vj 



Come in middies, 
Come to play, 
Freshman frolic 
Next Saturday. 

And the Freshmen did play — all one solid afternoon on May 6. In 
the track day regalia everyone joined in the tug-of-war, the hoop races, the 
dancing, and the best of all — wholesale destruction of the ice cream cone 
family. The hurdy-gurdy man, who "No sabeed Englisee" knew enough 
to let all the Freshmen turn the crank, and music in every time and tune 
sounded while the afternoon was romped and played away. 



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180 



ELECTION DAY 

The polls had closed at five o'clock on the afternoon of May 14, 191 5, 
and the returns from all elections at Simmons College were soon to be 
announced. The event was an innovation in our Student history, since it 
celebrated the election of the first President of the new Student Govern- 
ment Organization to include every girl and every other organization 
in college. The Seniors in caps and gowns stood on the steps and behind 
them were masses of flowers to be given by different classes and organi- 
zations to their newly-elected officers. The quadrangle was crowded with 
girls, cheering and singing as the results of elections were made known, 
and each officer mounted the steps to receive her congratulations and flowers. 

Miss Goodrich served a delicious supper on the lawn, after which 
a splendid Step Singing followed, and as darkness came the Seniors marched 
away singing Alma Mater. 




181 




JUNIOR-SENIOR PICNIC 
May 30, 1915 

All aboard! Everybody got her ticket? And is all the lunch here? 
Such were the exclamations when the classes of Nineteen Fifteen and Sixteen 
boarded the Nantasket boat at Rowes Wharf one morning last May. 
They were off to celebrate Decoration Day by the annual Junior-Senior 
Picnic at Nantasket Beach, and great was the anticipation for a most de- 
lightful day. Our expectations were fulfilled. We took the Amusement 
Park by storm, and did all the stunts. We paraded up and down the 
beach, played ball, and last, but not least — ate. It was a very bountiful 
lunch, and was improved by its salting of sand. 

The trip home on the boat was enlivened by Simmons songs, and the 
girls put into them all the spirit and enthusiasm that they had gained from 
such a jolly outing. 




182 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT RECEPTION 

The social season at Simmons opened with the annual reception of 
the Student Government Association to the new students and the faculty, 
on Saturday afternoon, September 25. Those in the receiving line were: 
Frances Banks, President of Student Government, President Lefavour, 
Dean Arnold, Miss Gloster, Miss Adams, Miss Goodrich, Miss Boyd, 
Miss Enos, Katharine Leonard, Gertrude Hussey, and Marjorie Yates. 

The Junior Welcoming Committee acted as ushers and as centers of 
"getting acquainted." Marjorie Soper and Beulah Knowles sang, and 
dancing and refreshments followed. 



DORMITORY GOVERNMENT DANCE 

The old Refectory scarcely saw a gayer array of gowns and pretty 
girls than on the night of the annual Dormitory Government dance to the 
Freshmen on Friday, October first. The upper class girls acted as escorts 
to the new girls and conducted them through the receiving line and the 
maze of the dance order. 

Those in the receiving line were: Mildred Bouve, President of the 
Dormitory Government, Marion Doten, Vice-President, Elizabeth Miller, 
Marion Scott, Dean Arnold, Miss Gloster, Miss Adams, Miss Goodrich, 
and Miss Enos. 

The music was excellent, and the dance proved a big success. 




183 




JUNIOR-FRESHMAN PARTY 

"The Lamentable Tragedy of Julius Caesar," a comic opera, was 
presented by the Class of 1 9 1 7 when they entertained their sister Fresh- 
men on October ninth. 

Great and unsuspected musical ability was revealed by the perform- 
ance. The Chairman of the Committee in charge was Katharine Sprague. 




184 



SIMMONS COUNTY FAIR 

The Senior Class entertained the Freshmen on Saturday afternoon, 
October 23, in the Exhibition House of the Refectory by astounding exhi- 
bitions of skill in tight-rope walking, trained seals, balloon ascension, and 
snake charmers, to say nothing of the display of wonderful wild animals 
and Fenway Flora, gathered with great danger from the wilds of the 
dump. The usual peanuts, ice cream cones, lollypops, and punch were 
generously partaken of. 

The management thanks Chief of Police Stearns for his efficient 
handling of the crowd and the success of the holiday. 



SOPHOMORE-SENIOR LUNCHEON 

Saturday, October 30, was an eventful day for the Sophomores. 
After the tennis tournament the Class of 191 8 entertained the Class of 
19 1 6 at luncheon. The sister classes sang many songs to each other between 
courses, and to Miss Kewpie and Mr. Woozie, who sat together in the 
middle of the floor. 

After the luncheon, "take-offs" on tennis terms were given by a number 
of the Sophomores. 

The committee in charge was : Marian Scott, Chairman, Priscilla 
Bancroft, Elinor Reilly, Eleanor Strong, Sally Page. 




185 



HALLOWE'EN 

On the eve of October 30, at the end of a day including Tennis Tour- 
nament and Sophomore-Senior Luncheon, the Hallowe'en Dinner and Party 
were given in the Refectory. 

The blazing cauldron was the centre of a gay scene in the evening 
when the brilliant masquerade began and the prizes given to Rae Finster- 
wald as a Japanese Maid, and to the Five Fountain Pens, K. Leonard, G. 
Hussey, Dorothy Day, Betty Jones, and Rachel Drinker, for beauty and 
originality. There followed a witch dance in the light of the flames from 
the cauldron — one could almost hear the spirits moaning. 

After quietness had settled down, the ghosts of the Sophomores came 
forth, as is their custom, and with clanking of chains, proclaimed the rule 
of the Spirits. 



THE DARRACH RECITALS 

To swell the Endowment Fund and to make people forget that they 
are being victimized is one of our most vital problems here at Simmons. 

To the Seniors Mr. Marshall Darrach appeared to be one happy 
solution. Certainly no one attended his course of Shakespeare Recitals 
who did not feel fully repaid for the temporary absence from books and 
study. 

Mr. Darrach's recitals are all from memory, each character being 
represented in turn. His presentations of Shakespeare without setting 
or costume make the meaning of the lines more vivid, while his skillful 
changes of voice and manner give actuality to his impersonations. 

The Recitals were held on Wednesday evenings in the Refectory. 
On November 10, "A Mid-Summer Night's Dream" was presented. On 
November 17, "The Merchant of Venice," and on December 1, "Julius 

CM 
aesar. 



186 



SOPHOMORE-FRESHMAN PARTY 

The class of 191 8 entertained the entering class on Saturday, December 
4, in the Refectory, which was the scene of a great track meet. Nine 
prominent colleges were well represented. Miss Gloster, Miss Goodrich, 
Miss Boyd, and Miss Diall were the judges. 

Eleanor Strong acted as chairman of the committee. 



THE CHRISTMAS PARTY 

On the evening of December Seventeenth the Refectory was the 
scene of a wonderful Christmas festival. Katharine Leonard and Frances 
Banks were host and hostess in the role of Lord and Lady Macbeth. They, 
with their retinue, which included the White Nun, Red Cardinal, the 
Herald, Pages, and Jesters, sat around a table on the dais. The rest of 
the hall was filled with guests in many gorgeous costumes. Hardly were 
they seated when in the distance music was heard. It was the Glee Club 
singing Christmas carols. Nearer and nearer they came until at last they 
entered the banquet hall and took their places. 

Then came the "eats" and luscious cider. After dinner, more fun ! 
"Julius Cassar, a Farce," was given by the Juniors, and "Pyramus and 
Thisbe," by the Seniors. 

Great credit for the success of the party is due to the committee in 
charge, and especially to the chairman, Christine Ricker. 




187 



GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS 

February 26, 1916 

PROGRAM 

I Spinning Song from "The Flying Dutchman" 

Glee Club 
Incidental Solo by Anne Mulcaster 



II Blue-White March 



Mandolin Club 



III Selected Voices 

(a) Hedge Roses 

(b) Old Shepherd Song 

IV Humoresque (by request) 

Mandolin Club 

V (a) All Through the Night 
(b) Moonlit Meadows 

Glee Club 

VI (a) Nur, wer die Sehnsucht Kennt 

(b) Irish Folk Song 

(c) My Laddie 

Miss Marion Bickford 

VII Morceau Facile 

Mandolin Club 

VIII (a) Swiss Mountain Song 

Marjorie Soper and Glee Club 

(b) Hong-Kong Romance 

Glee Club 

(c) Senior Grind — I Doubt It. 

IX Alma Mater 



Wagner 



Ernst Schmidt 



Schubert 



Dvorak 



Welsh Air 
Czibulka 



Tschaikowsky 

Arthur Foote 

Thayer 

Bo Jim 



Henry Had ley 



188 



March 18, 1916 

PART I 

THE LAND OF HEART'S DESIRE 
By William B. Yeats 



Maurtien Bruin, a peasant, 
Shawn Bruin, his son, 
Father Hart, a priest, 
Bridget Bruin, 
Marie Bruin, 
A child 



Margaret Daniels, '19 

Gladys Bishop, '18 

Marjorie Hulsizer, '16 

Gladys Emerson, '16 

Elsie Rieger, '18 

Isabel Hurlbutt, '16 



Scene — The Kitchen of Maurtien Brain's House. 

MUSIC BY THE MANDOLIN CLUB 

Incidental Music by Miss Marjorie Wilder 

PART II 

SPREADING THE NEWS 
By Lady Gregory 



Bartley Fallon, 

Mrs. Fallon, 

Jack Smith, 

Shawn Early, 

Tim Casey, 

James Ryan, 

Mrs. Tarpey, 

Mrs. Tulley, 

A Policeman (Jo Muldoon] 

A Removable Magistrate, 

Scene — Outskirts of a Fair. 



Gertrude Hussey, 

Mary McLaughlin, 

Salome Alger, 

Marjorie Heseltine, 

Madeline Favin, 

Ruth Sanborn, 

Helen Stacy, 

Julia McCabe, 

Madeline Cleveland, 

Louise Beckwith, 



16 

17 
18 
16 
18 
L9 
19 
17 
16 
18 



Time — The Present. 



189 



MIRACLE PLAY 

On December 14, 191 5, the Coventry Nativity Play was given under 
the auspices of the Y.W.C.A. The acting was well and effectively done, 
and the whole performance showed how much can be accomplished, with 
a little ingenuity and thought, even with our present small resources. The 
cast of characters was as follows : 



Isaiah 

Mary 

Joseph 

An Angel 

A Herald 

Herod 

First Shepherd 

Second Shepherd 

Third Shepherd 

First King 

Second King 

Third King 



Frances Dittmer 

Rachel Drinker 

Mildred Bouve 

Opal Fisher 

Beulah Knowles 

Marjorie Hulsizer 

Isabelle Hurlburtt 

Gertrude Hussey 

Marion Doten 

Sue Beckwith 

Sally Page 

Mary Pollard 



The carols were under the direction of Marjorie Soper. A collection 
was taken in aid of foreign students after the play. 







191 



CHRISTMAS VESPER SERVICE 

December 19, 191 5 

Organ Prelude : Shepherds in the Field Mailing 

Processional: Adestes Fideles 
Scripture Reading 

Dr. Farley 
Quartette : Holy Night 
The Lord's Prayer 
Choir: 

(a) Say, where is He born? (from oratorio "Christus") Mendelssohn 

Solo: Ruth Howe 

(b) Carol: Noel 
Address 

Dean Arnold 
Organ Selection : Christmas Pastorale /. S. Bach 

Solo : In a Manger Lowly Daniels 

Marjorie Soper 
Violin : Katherine Kimball 
Hymn : Joy to the World, the Lord is come ! 
Benediction 

Recessional: Hark! the herald angels sing 
Organ Postlude : Hallelujah Chorus Handel 




192 



; 




fegi 





193 





194 



NASSON INSTITUTE 

Nasson Institute was established under the provisions of the will of 
the late George Nasson of Springvale, Maine, who died September 17, 
1882. Among his bequests was a sum of money for the establishment at 
some future date of an institution "for the moral, intellectual, and physical 
instruction and education of young women." In carrying out the provisions 
of Mr. Nasson's will, the original Trustees of Nasson Institute, represen- 
tative business men of Springvale, after long and careful consideration, 
decided to establish a vocational school which should offer courses in Home 
Economics and in Secretarial training. Important conferences were held 
with Honorable Payson Smith, State Superintendent of Schools in Maine, 
and Miss Sarah Louise Arnold, Dean of Simmons College, as well as with 
other educators, who heartily endorsed the program of the Trustees. Plans 
were thereupon made to proceed with the erection of the Institute building. 
The Dedicatory exercises were held on Friday evening, January 24, 19 13, 
at which time the principal address was given by Dean Arnold, who has 
since become a member of the Board of Trustees. 

The Trustees secured as Dean of the Institute Miss Louisa I. Pryor, 
formerly Head of the Department of Household Economics of the State 
Normal School at Keene, New Hampshire. Miss Pryor is a graduate of 
the Salem Normal School. She secured her vocational training at Simmons 
College. Associated with her during the first year were Miss Edith B. 
Hunt, in the Home Economics Department, and Miss Helena Marco, in 
the Secretarial Department, both of whom received their training at Sim- 
mons. In 1 9 14 the faculty was increased by the addition of Miss Margaret 
Page and Miss Marjory I. Barto, graduates of Simmons College, and Miss 
Ruth Laighton of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, instructor in Physical 
Training. In 191 5 Miss Evelyn Cobb, a graduate of Nasson Institute, 
was elected assistant in Home Economics. 

Nasson Institute provides two-year courses in Home Economics and 
in Secretarial Training which are open to high school graduates, and which 
lead to a diploma. The registration in 19 15 numbered one hundred and 
two students. Graduates of the school are successfully filling positions 
as teachers, dietitians, and secretaries in various parts of New England. 



195 



SILVER BAY 

Silver Bay is not only very substantially a glorious spot in one of the 
numberless curves of Lake George, New York, but it is at the same time 
a glorious experience. Sixteen delegates went from Simmons College last 
year and, though that is a tiny proportion of the six hundred assembled 
from all the Eastern colleges, Simmons took her place in the religious and 
in the social events which crowded the ten short, full, wonderful days 
there. Simmons also took her place in athletics — winning the diving 
through Esther Richardson's skill. 

Only those who have lived through those ten days know what is meant 
by "the Spirit of Silver Bay." It embodies the finest, noblest, and most 
natural fellowship both with man and the Divine. To those who have 
been there the world assumes a big and wonderful new aspect of beauty 
and worth. 

Can't at least twenty-five delegates from Simmons be there this year? 
Let them not only in themselves be filled with the glorious enthusiasm and 
inspiration of the place and experience, but let them bring it back to make 
the college twenty-five times better next year. 




196 








******* 




At*- 
f 












Just a little humor, 

Just a quip or jest, 

Just a little anecdote, 

To give the whole more zest. 

Just a little verse, 

Just a little prose, 

Just a little parody 

That everybody knows. 

Just a little soberness 

Mingled with the rest, 

Makes the Microchaos 

The part we like the best. 









BEST DRESSED 

Style is the dress of thoughts. 

Betty Bouve 
Margaret Currier 
Opal Fisher 



MOST POPULAR 

The force of her own merit makes her way. 

G. Hussey 
K. Leonard 



BEST ALL-ROUND GIRL 

None but thyself could he thy parallel. 

G. Hussey 
Martha Whiting 
Katherine Leonard 



200 



BRIGHTEST 

Thou art deep and bright within. 

Frances Keegan 
Margaret Sullivan 
Eva Jacobi 




BUSIEST 

As busy as a bee. 

Frances Banks 
Margaret Currier 
Georgia Sawyer 



LEAST APPRECIATED 

The world is satisfied with words. Few appreciate 
the things beneath. 

Mic Board 
Editor of Mic 
Myself 



BEST STUDENT 

The more we study, the more discover our ignorance. 

Mae Jouvette 
Marjorie Hazeltine 
Frances Keegan 





201 



1 






MOST VERSATILE 

People should talk not to please themselves hut 
those who hear them. 

G. Hussey 
Betty Bouve 
Julia Edwards 



MOST ATHLETIC 

The harder matched, the greater victory 
'Tis deeds must win the prize. 

G. Hussey 
Marjorie Yates 



MOST PROMISING 

Whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing well. 

Helen Fagg 
Frances Banks 
Frances Keegan 



WITTIEST 

Thy wit is as quick as the greyhound's mouth- 
it catches. 

Blanche Woodward 
Isabelle Hurlbutt 



202 



MOST ORIGINAL 

Isabelle Hurlbutt 
G. Hussey 




BEST NATURED 

What should a man do but be merry! 

Dr. Charles Underwood 
Helen B. Foster 
Mildred Bouve 




NEATEST 

We are charmed by neatness o\f person, 
Let not thy hair be out of order. 

Opal Fisher 
Grace Phillips 
Lillian Webber 




203 




MOST CAPABLE 

We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, 
while others judge us by what we have already done. 

Frances Banks 
Julia Leamy 
Eva Jacobi 




MOST TACTFUL 

Never elated while one man's oppressed; 
Never dejected while another' s blessed. 

K. Leonard 
Opal Fisher 
Esther Richardson 



MOST RESPECTED 

Respect a man, he will do the more. 

K. Leonard 
Frances Banks 




MOST USEFUL 

Unless what we do is useful, our glory is vain. 

Martha Whiting 
G. Hussey 
Jean Masson 



204 



MOST AFFECTIONATE 

All mankind loves a lover. 

Rachel Drinker 
Opal Fisher 
Evelyn Brewster 




MOST DIGNIFIED 

Dignity does not consist in possessing honor but 
in deserving it. 

Emily Webb 
Katherine Hobart 
Marjorie Hulsizer 




HARDEST WORKER 

And still be working, never done. 

Ruth Hills 
Margaret McGrath 
Margaret Sinclair 




205 




THE BEST LOOKING 

Beauty comes, we scarce know how, as an emanation 
from sources deeper than itself. 

Alice Gray 
Rose Reardon 
Helen Giere 




BEST BLUFFER 

Helen Cosgrove 
Leone Foote 
G. Hussey 





206 



A JOURNEY 

"Kay" Leonard and "Gee" Hassey were strolling around our new 
Simmons park when a Currier came running up to them and asked if they 
wouldn't like to take a turn in a car. Now "Gee' was a first-rate Walker 
but "Kay" was all Fagged out, so they gladly assented and jumped into a 
Stearns at the curbing. The car was exquisitely upholstered in Gray with a 
Foote rest for each passenger and whenever they wished to give the chauf- 
feur directions, they rang a Bell. All went smoothly for the Rhodes were 
fine, until the chauffeur changed a Giere suddenly around a corner. The car 
swerved to one side and almost went over the Banks of a small pond where 
Fish were swimming. Then they passed a Littlefield where some girls were 
Berry picking. Each one was dressed in white, Waring a Barm (bonnie)- 
eoat, though the day was hot. In the distance, down the Hills and across 
a Field they saw someone hurrying toward them. They slacked their 
speed and soon recognized Helen Foster lately appointed Athletic Super- 
visor of the Freshmen, armed with a bag of golf sticks that were furnishing 
her vigorous exercise. 

"Hozce are yer?" she greeted them heartily, as she swung on to the 
running board. "I Sawyer coming and thought I'd say hello." 

"Well," they said, "We've made two Rounds of the park and haven't 
found the new swimming pool yet!" 

"Oh Shaw," exclaimed Helen, "It's no Moore than a Stone's throw, 
Righter across the bridge, can't miss it. See you later," and off the car went. 

So across the bridge they went. 

"I'll Grant she was Wright," announced "Kay," gazing up at an 
imposing stone structure, "we can't miss it." 

Just then they noticed a group of Young people filing out of the main 
entrance. They all had on the same kind of Coats. One girl, was evi- 
dently disabled and someone had to Wheeler. 

"Pray why," queried "Gee," "when the sun Burns like this, do they all 
have to wear coats?" 

"The Dean thinks it looks neater," replied the Currier in a conclusive 
manner. 

A musical murmer caused them all to turn around. 

"Come on, Babe," called Rachel Drinker, and then she caught sight 
of the car. She stood Stark still and Elsie Mahar looked as if transfixed 
to JVood. Then they ran to the car and embraced the couple. 

"Well, how are yer Phelanf My! I'm glad to see yer. Leamy have 
a ride?" grinned Rachel all in one breath. 



207 



"Sure," they said in chorus, "but hustle in because we think it's going to 
rain. We've felt several drops already, and we don't want to get Wet- 
more for fear it will take the Whiting off our shoes." 

So the party merrily rode along, for Knight was coming on and they 
wanted to be out of the park by six. They were nearing the gate when 
who should they meet but Emily Webb. She was tremendously glad to see 
them and in the course of conversation informed them that the Honor system 
had been working splendidly. (She had been retained as a Counselor to 
keep up the high standard she set in 191 6.) 

At length the trio reached the gate and "Gee" and "Kay" gave the 
Tolman a generous Toll to help along the Endowment Fund. 

"Well," said "Kay," as the Currier took them to the station, in time 
to catch their train, "We've had a most glorious time and thanks a lot." 

"Yes," chimed in "Gee," we expected to have merely a Triplett by 
ourselves, but it's turned out to be quite a journey, and my! it certainly 
was good to see all the familiar folks!" 



<xz 



time 



TAKING CHANCES 

Not following the "Red Trail." 

Cutting Chapel. 

Talking above a whisper in the corridors. 

Getting a "Redeemable" from Miss Walker. 

Coming late to Com Law. 

Being in the "Henway" after five P.M. 

Not being in one's own room after 10 P.M. 

Plugging lights. 

Postponing the purchase of one's Glee Club tickets until the appointed 

(N.B. — The Freshmen did not.) 
Waiting until 12.35 t0 § et a seat ' n tne lunch-room. 
Letting Miss Stites add up the hours on your Economics reading slips. 



JOS 




See them go to their classes. 

No matter what the day, 

Some that hurry, some that lag. 

And some that loiter along the way. 

There are some that talk, 

As together they walk 

And some are silent, wrapt in thought. 

Some give a smile that brightens awhile 

The day for some one else ; 

A friendly word that makes the heart light 

And helps the mind to be quick and bright. 

Thus they go through rain or snow 

And in the sunshine golden. 

How little they know as to and fro, 

They tread their way to class, 

What a spirit of love and unity 

May come from the daily walk. 

The spirit of cheer and helpfulness 

That each of us should feel, 

As day by day together we work 

And laugh and play and talk. 

May the courage they gain 

Quicken heart and brain, 

And stay with them through life, 

May their spirits be bold for truth and right, 

And just toward any wrong. 

May they go forth to work with might 

Nor think too much of gain. 

May their labors be wrought 

With love and thought, 

And no great share of pain. 

We send them out each to fill her place 

In a world of life and love, 

A world where pain is so well known, 

And of sorrow there is to spare. 

May the strength that is theirs 

Help them do their part; 

May they live their lives in a better way, 

May they keep their bodies strong and well, 

May their souls be pure, and their hearts right 

true, 
Help them their songs to sing 
With a gladsome note and a clear true ring, 
Because of the gifts that to life they bring. 



209 



THE NINETEEN-SIXTEEN-IAD 



BOOK I. 



Of books and the girl I sing, who, early forced by high aims 

Turned from the gentler teachings and happy days of the prep schools. 

Long troubles bore she with lessons, within the walls of Simmons, 

Till she had won way to fame, as a member of sixteen's famous numbers. 

Sixteen, nineteen sixteen, oh, tell us, from whence springs your glory so 
wondrous ? 

Down in the Freshman rooms, one hundred and six, and one ten 

Sixteen struggled bravely to master Carhart and Physics. 

History, themes and reference, wonders indeed were accomplished. 

Down in the gym with the basket, out on the field in track, 

Brave sixteen won honors and numerals, brave sixteen came third in the 
track meet. 

The voices of classmates rang true with the names of Hussey and Yates. 

And the Frolic which closed up the year for us Freshmen filled all with 
the promise 

Of joy in the work and the play in the three years ahead with our class- 
mates. 



BOOK II. 

Wonderful joy to renew — to tell of the glory of this year! 

More books and studies followed, but of those we remember but little. 

Out of the host of things that crowded this year so glorious, 

Our track meet stands without peer in the annals of Simmons. 

Nineteen sixteen, with prowess unequalled came first on the list with all 

trophies. 
Thirty-six were the points that we won; and again we cheered our girls 

proudly; 
For Hussey, and Yates, and for Wheeler and Hammond and Stevens and 

Grant. 
In tennis we have such a champion, oh, Mildred, our love lasts forever. 
And Sophomore luncheon! we think of its toasts and its eats and its 

songs, 
But more of the brave, the dear class that we love and call 191 6. 



210 




BOOK III. 

A new year has dawned and we find we are now upper classmen, and 

Juniors. 
A new dignity we have acquired, put on with our bright yellow hush- 
buttons. 
The corridors, erstwhile so noisy lie hushed (?) 'neath the sway of the 

Juniors. 
We miss the dear faces of Seniors, our Seniors, the fair class of '14. 
But we welcome the cute little Freshmen, the incoming children called '18. 
The year with its work and its pleasures takes wings to itself and speeds 

from us. 
Books and more books we digest and honors we win in athletics. 
The House Party at Clifton stands out as three days of bright sun and 

sea breezes. 
Then follows Our Prom until happiness knows no bounds for us Juniors. 
In basketball, tennis and track walk, we made a good showing, we 

Juniors. 
At the Meet, we outdid all our other achievements! 'Twas '16 won first 
i\.nd the points that we made numbered thirty. Three cups which were 

given to '16 
Made unequalled our pride in our members. So ended the year for our 

brave class. 

BOOK IV. 

And now we no longer are children, but Seniors, grave Seniors of Simmons. 
Eagerly don we our black gowns and parade the halls of our college. 
With welcoming handclasp we greet the tried friends of these three 

years so happy. 
Too soon, all too soon, we must leave all these girls and our fair Alma 

Mater. 
The thought does not dim but enhances the joys of the weeks fleeting past 

us. 
Again we take part in the tournament with our valiant Mildred as 

champion. 
We sit with the Sophomores at luncheon, our dear sister class, how we 

love you ! 
Hallowe'en with its ghostly proceedings, Thanksgiving recess and at last 
Before we can realize, the Christmas vacation has gone. We are back 
To our work with Exams just before us. And so, on we hasten to June 
All our aims and our hopes are fixed high on the service which lies just 

beyond us. 
Out from the doors of our college we soon shall be passing forever. 
Oh, 1916, be brave, loyal, true to the ideals of Simmons! 

211 




ENGLISH 4 C 

R-equired is the word that in all courses staggers 
E-ach girl who forsees all the work it implies. 
Q-uestion it not for instructors look daggers 
U-nless the assignment is done as time flies. 
I-n every book a deep meaning is hiding, 
R-ead and devour till you have it quite clear. 
E-very day's record is with it abiding 
D-o it, don't hesitate, you will pay dear. 

R-eading in English is really a pleasure 
E-ach girl enjoys at her own sweet will. 
A-different aspect there seems here, however, 
D-oing it now a requirement to fill. 
I-nto it enters the stern call of duty 
N-othing spontaneous urges us on. 
G-ain we now much, or gain we now little, 
English 4C must be done, must be done. 



AS IT SEEMS 

In summer I can sleep at night 
Until the early morning light. 
It is quite different in the fall, 
I never get to bed at all ! 

And when for sleep my soul doth yearn 
The midnight oil I have to burn. 
Com. Law or Chemistry to con 
Or cooking costs to dwell upon. 

And even if I try to doze 
I cannot have a sweet repose. 
Dreams tell me hour exams are due, 
And lengthy written papers, too. 

But still we all are students gay 
And very learned, so they say. 
And though it seems we ne'er see beds 
I'm sure we are not sleepy-heads. 

212 



ON MRS. HAYWARD'S TEAS FOR LATE-COMERS 

I hear you calling me 
To have a cup of tea, 
A welcome sound from thee, 
Dear Mrs. Hayward. 

The snow is falling fast, 
I came in at the last, 
And feared my turn was past, 
Dear Mrs. Hayward. 

But now I've had my tea 
What matters it to me, 
Still storming though it be, 
Dear Mrs. Hayward. 




213 



SHOWS 

The Only Girl, 

Daddy Long-Legs, 

Chin Chin, 

It Pays to Advertise, 

The Chief, 

The Girl Who Smiles, 

The Dumb Wife, 

The Shadow, 

Watch Your Step, 

Under Fire, 

The Road to Happiness, 

A Full House, 

A Pair of Sixes, 

Peg o' My Heart, 

Nobody Home, 

The Belle of Bond Street, 

Under Cover, 

The Sunshine Girl, 

Little Women, 

The Doll Girl, 
Fine Feathers, 
Sherlock Holmes, 
The Firefly, 
The Cradle Snatchcr, 



G. Hussey 

D. GlLMAN 
H. McDoUGALL 

J. Edwards 

K. Leonard 

M. Bouve 

E. Humphrey 

J. Masson 

R. Drinker 

M. Heseltine 

E. Foster 

H. Foster 

E. Wood 

M. Currier 

E. Colonna 

M. Riley 

M. Kelley 

M. Whiting 

E. Colonna 

M. Hutchins 

J. Masson 

H. Young 

H. Cornish 

L. Foote 

E. Stearns 
B. Woodward 

E. Stearns 



214 



THE LUNCH HOUR 

Madly they run downstairs, 
Wildly they seize the chairs, 
Pile up their books in layers, 
At the lunch hour. 
Stand in an endless line, 
Study the menu sign, 
Waiting a chance to dine, 
During the hour. 

Trays to the right of them, 
Trays to the left of them, 
Trays fore and aft of them, 
Hurled by unnumbered. 
Flash they the forks in air, 
Wield spoons and silver there, 
Glasses without a care — 
And never are sundered. 

Lunch they without delay, 
Merry they are and gay, 
Laughing all care away 
At the lunch hour. 
Eager to "gym" they go, 
Dance just a bit, you know 
Who would not have it so 
At the lunch hour? 



History Prof.: "What is the Petrine Theory?" 

Answer: "The Pope is the only man who is worthy to be kissed." 



Math. I. 

Dr. B. : "Can you explain how the cosines for 45 degrees to 90 degrees 
are the same as for o degrees to 45 degrees?" 

Miss P.: "Oh, yes! They just swapped around!" 



215 



T haddeus seen, but not heard. 
H appiness at mid-years. 

I nk in your fountain pen. 
N otes which make sense two weeks later. 
G and K on time to dinner. 

S leeping in the rest room. 

T atting for the Belgians. 
H ats worn when crossing the Dump. 
A vacant chair in the lunch room. 
T ests coming singly. 

N ew Dormitories. 

E veryone on time for Psych. 

V ariety in Sunday dinner. 

E nough Seniors to fill their section in Chapel. 

R ose forgetting to send bills. 

H ot coffee at breakfast. 

A free afternoon. 

P olicemen in the Fenway. 

P eterboro Fire Drill. 

E veryone following the red trail. 

N ormal prices at the book-store. 



TO KEWPIE 

O QP tell us now do U 
Know just how much we O 2 U ? 
For marching down the chapel IL 
We feel yours is a kindly smile. 
Bcaws of U our IDS fine 
Are made much EZR to shine. 
And if from slight OBCT 
Track sees not your activity, 
You're no less a plus NTT 
4 all our XS XTC. 
The NV of the NME, 
Is due 2 U. 



216 



BROKE, BROKE, BROKE 

Broke, broke, broke, 

I wall everlastingly; 

If my purse I could only replenish 

How blissful and happy I'd be. 

well for the Croesus of old 

Who could revel and frolic and spend 

With never a thought or a fear 

He'd be pauper each month at the end. 

And the pleasures gay go on, 
They alluringly pass me by, 
Gay sport bids me follow her train 
But I look in my purse with a sigh. 

Broke, broke, broke, 

1 gasp eternally 

For the welcome sight of the coin that is gone 
Will never come back to me. 




217 



SlMERICKS 

There was a young maid, quite a queen, 

Who went to class in 1 16. 

But what she heard there 

Gave her such a bad scare, 

That since then she hasn't been seen. 



Of what value are lectures in Psych., 

Indeed we might go on a Pstrick, 

Were it not for the fact 

That wherein they lact, 

We make up by booming the Mych. 



To Simmons came Annabelle Lee, 

And she went to Room 223, 

To take an exam 

On how to cook ham 

And how to serve lemon in tea. 

Though she worked her hardest and best, 

She flunked in the terrible test, 

So she packed up her grip 

And set out on a trip 

To her little gray home in the West. 



In Psych. : "Tomorrow we shall have — Cancer — or what not!" 



Freshman: "Oh, dear! I've lost my 'Life's Ideals,' and I do feel 
so badly, because I just got them, — they're new ideals!" 



21S 




THE DAILY TRAIL 

How do you like to go off on a bat 
Out in the country fair? 
Many a plan we would make for that 
With never a thought of care. 

Over the meadows and through the fields 
Wandering far and wide. 
Isn't it joy to be roaming thus 
Over the countryside ? 

But over the dump is the well-known trail 
We travel most of all. 

And though with pleasure we stray sometimes, 
We answer Simmons' call. 



Three fast-flying figures come into sight, 
Rapidly rolling down the long pike, 
K, G, and Dr. Burt, each on a bike. 

Say, gentle reader, say is it right, 

That we poor unfortunates should have to hike, 

While they go wheeling their way to Psych? 



219 



Characters : 



SLAUGHTER OF THE INNOCENTS 

OR, 

A Modern Inquisition at Simmons 

Inquisitor. — Instructor who craves information. 
Victims. — Class in English 6. 



Act I. 
Inq. — Who was Herod? 
Vict. — A wicked king. 
Inq. — Where do we hear of him? 
Vict. — In Sunday School. 

Inq. — What was the wickedest thing he ever did? 
Vict. — Killed children. 
Inq. — Why? 

Vict. — Because he heard there was to be a King of the Jews greater 
than he. 

Inq. — How was Jesus saved? 

Vict. — Pharoah's daughter hid him in the bulrushes. 
Inq. — And what was this whole thing called? 
Vict. — The Passover. 

CURTAIN 

Act II 
Bible class instituted at Simmons. 



A girl was having a hard time keeping her balance on her ice skates; 
either her skates were dull, or she couldn't skate. The fifth time she fell 
down, she was heard to mutter as they pulled her to her feet, "There must 
be something the matter with the ice!" 

Physics Instructor: "If you weigh a bowl of water, and then 
weigh some gold fish and put them in the water, will all together weigh 
more or less, or the same, as the sum of the two weights?" 

Miss S. : "Less, because the fish will drink up a lot of the water." 

220 



(Mntfcar 





■Dormitory Government dance. 
-First Vespers — Dean Arnold speaks. 
-Woods mislaid from 116 — "Oil, where, 

oh where has our little Woods gone?" 
5— South Hall's Vaudeville Show— Julia's 

debut. 
7.— B. Brown spills the egg sauce — Why 

pick on the President, B? 
8.— South Hall gets a Victrola. 
9.— South Hall decides not to have a Vic— 

We wonder why? 
11. — Vic returned to Music 

House. Seniors to 

Scituate. 
12. — Columbus Day — Sen- 
iors return. 
13. — Try-outs for Glee Club. 
14. — Senior Class picture 

taken. 
IS. — New supplies at show 

case. 



Busy day for the Welcoming 

Committee. 
Excitement. 
Pictures hung and chafing dishes 

unpacked. 
Classes begin. 

Mildred Bouve's engagement an- 
nounced. 
Student Government Reception. 
Mil's Tin Shower— A rolling-pin 
to insure perfect bread. 

29. — Seniors wear caps 
and gowns to 
chapel. 
30.— Sacred to the Mem- 
ory of the initiation 
of K's and G's 
bicycles. 



\ 








Oct. 

1 i. — Everybody reads Persimmons. "It pays to advertise." 

18. — Miss Arnold to dinner — Seniors serenade at Pete House. 

19. — Senior Dean's Meeting. 

20. — Senior Secretarial learn States and Capitals of the U.S. 

25. — Seniors vote for low collars to be worn with caps and gowns. 

27. — Ghost stories told by Dr. Van Allen. 

28 — Senior-College Graduate Tea. 

30. — Tennis Tournament. 

30. — Hallowe'en "7TK 

30. — Sophomore-Senior Luncheon. <^t3 




Nov. 



• \'s 



-Pay Day — Everybody poor. 

-Grand Bonfire — Many boxes removed from Sewing Classes. 

-Chocolate pudding for dinner. 

-A new hump in the dump. 

-Six Pete House girls on time for breakfast. 

-Delegates left for Student Government Convention. 

-Frances Keegan goes home with typhoid fever. 

-K. and G. on time for dinner. 

-Y.W.C.A. Vocational Conference. 

-Rainy day. 

-Mass Meeting at College — Dormitory Government meeting at 

the halls. 
-Harvard- Yale Game. 
-Thanksgiving Vacation. 
-Thanksgiving. 
-Vacation. 
-Vacation. 
-Vacation. 

-School opens — Ellen Foster's engagement announced. 
-Excuse, there is no 31. 









12.- 



GlTor 11 



-Marshall Darrach gives Julius Creser. 

-K. Leonard goes out for Basketball. — We mourn the athlete we 

have missed. 
-"Alarm Clock" overslept — Third Floor South late to breakfast. 
-Pongee Samplers passed in. 
-Miracle Play by Y.W,C.A._ 
-Dean Fitch speaks at Christmas Chapel. 
-Senior "Get-together Week" Tea. 
-Christmas Party. 
-Christmas Vespers. 
-Psych Final — and Packing ! 
-College closes for Christmas Vacation. 



-College Opens after the Vacation — Busy day for Adams Express. 

-Mud in the Dump. 

-As seen in Simmons Halls: 

Beware ! Lock your Lockers ! 
What does the Honor System mean to the College? 

-Current Events — Talk on Alcoholism, preceded by non-prohi- 
bition pie. 

-Third Floor South gets Bangs. 

-Pete House Tea. 

-Handel and Haydn Society gives "Messiah" — Simmons College 
attends in a body. 

-Mid-years begin. 

-Busy. 

-First Exam. 

-Another Exam. 



222 




h A.rt, 



Feb. 

1. — Another Exam. 

2. — Ground Hog Day — He saw his shadow. 

3. — Another Exam. 

4. — Another Exam. 

5. — End of Mid-years — sigh of relief. 

7. — The beginning of Second Term. 

8. Morgan bronzes the radiators. 

9.— Sally Page gets the Mumps. North Hall fire drill. 11.45. 
10. — Persimmons appears. We unplug our lights. 
11. — A real snow storm. Our confessions increase Miss Arnold's 

correspondence. 
12. — Senior Marks and Professional Possibilities wildly considered. 

"Be still, our wildly beating hearts." 
13. — Senior Class still living. 
14. — Fran receives a Valentine — Special delivery. 
15. — Almost a cut in Psychology. 
17. — Freshmen corner Glee Club tickets. 
18. — Excitement reigns. 
19. — Two dances decided upon. 
20. — Articles appear in the Post. 
21. — Another engagement announced. Washington Birthday party 

at the Halls. 
22. — Please 'scuse, the Mic went to print yesterday. 
23. — The happiest day in the Editor's life. 




223 



ADVERTISING 
DEPARTMENT 




(SHaHBtfafo ICtat of Anu^rttH^rs 



ART SHOP page 

B. Kabatznick xx 

BANK 

State Street Trust Co xvii 

BATHROOM FIXTURES 

Geo. T. Johnson xviii 

BOOKS 

A. D. Maclachlan xxii 

Old Corner Bookstore, Inc xix 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Cox Sons & Vining xvii 

CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS 

A. Hathaway Co vi 

CHINA AND GLASSES 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton xiii 

COAL 

Staples Coal Co. of Boston xxii 

CONFECTIONERY 

Farquharson Candy Co ix 

Otto Gunther's Sons xviii 

COSTUMES TO RENT 

Hayden Costume Co xviii 

DEPARTMENT STORES 

Jordan Marsh Co v 

C. F. Hovey Co vii 

ENGRAVER 

King Company xxi 

EXPRESS 

Armstrong Transfer Co ix 

Chase Express Co xii 

FIREPLACE FITTINGS 

B. F. Macy viii 

FLORIST 

Houghton-Gorney Co. iv 

FOOTWEAR 

M. Carman viii 

Crossett Shoe xx 

T. E. Moseley vii 

Sample Shoe Shop Co xxii 

Thayer McNeil Co xvi 

FURRIER 

Otto J. Piehler, Inc xx 

ICE 

Independent Ice Co xxi 

INSURANCE 

Cyrus Brewer Co x 

Devvick & Flanders x 

Employers' Liability Assurance... x 

Field & Cowles ■ x 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Co.. x 

Watson & Rivinius x 



JELLO PAGE 

Genesee Pure Food Co xxiii 

JEWELER 

Dieges & Clust vii 

KITCHENWARE 

John W. Cosden & Co xx 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co xiii 

B. F. Macy viii 

LAMPS^ 

McKenney, Waterbury Co viii 

LAUNDRY 

Cambridge Laundry Co xii 

MASON 

Arthur D. Jones vi 

MILK 

D. Whiting & Sons xxii 

MILLINERY 

Fannette xv 

C. F. Hovey vii 

OPTICAL GOODS 

Pinkham & Smith ix 

ORIENTAL SHOP 

Walter M. Hatch viii 

PAINTING AND DECORATING 

Bemis & Jewett vii 

F. M. Rogers & Co xvi 

PHOTOGRAPH SUPPLIES 

Pinkham & Smith ix 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Champlain Studios xiv 

PLUMBER 

John W. Cosden & Co xx 

PROVISIONS 

Batchelder & Snyder viii 

Cobb, Bates & Yerxa Co xvi 

S. S. Pierce Co xv 

Prior & Townsend, Inc i\ 

Smith Brothers xvi 

Weston-Thurston Co xviii 

PRINTER 

Caustic-Claflin Co xi 

J. C. Miller, Jr xviii 

D. B- Updike xiii 

RUGS AND DRAPERIES 

Chandler & Co xx 

Waller M. Hatch viii 

SEWING MACHINES 

C. C. Bowles xix 

SILKS AND DRESS GOODS 

Walter M. Hatch viii 

Beattie & McGuire xii 

Thresher Brothers vi 



II 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



STATIONERY page 

Ward's xv 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES 

A. D. Maclachlan xxii 

W. D. Paine ix 

TAILOR 

A. Axelson xv 

Beacon Tailoring Co ix 

TEA AND LUNCH ROOM 

English Tea Room xii 

Women's Educational and Indus- 
trial Union xix 



TEACHERS' AGENCY pace 

Fisk Teachers' Agency xx 

WEARING APPAREL (Dresses, Suits, 
Waists) 

Chandler & Co , xx 

Walter M. Hatch viii 

C. F. Hovey & Co vii 

Henry S. Lombard ix 

Jordan Marsh Co v 

Meyer Jonasson & Co xiii 

F. P. O'Connor xxi 

A. Shuman & Co xv 

E. T. Slatterv Co xi 



Snbtx tn Afmprttors 



Inasmuch as the generous response of our advertisers has largely made 
possible the publication of the Microcosm, the least we can do is to patronize 
the firms herein represented. 



PAGE 

Armstrong Transfer Express Co ix 

A. Axelson xv 

Batchelder & Snyder Co viii 

Beacon Tailoring Co ix 

Beattie & McGuire xii 

Bemis & Jewett vii 

C. C. Bowles & Co xix 

Cyrus Brewer & Co. x 

Cambridge Laundry xii 

Carman's Specialty Shoe Shop viii 

Caustic-Claflin Co xi 

Champlain Studios xiv 

Chandler & Co xx 

Chase Express Co xii 

Cobb, Bates & Yerxa Co xvi 

John W. Cosden & Co xx 

Cox Sons & Vining xvii 

Crossett Shoe Co xx 

Dieges & Oust vii 

Dewick & Flanders x 

Employers' Liability Assurance Corpo- 
ration x 

English Tea Room xii 

Fannette 7 xv 

Farquharson Candy Co ix 

Field & Cowles x 

Fisk Teachers' Agency xx 

Genesee Food Co xxiii 

Otto Gunther's Sons xviii 

Walter M. Hatch viii 

A. Hathaway Co vi 

Hayden Costume Co xviii 

Houghton-Gorney Co iv 

C. F. Hovey Co vii 

Independent Ice Co xxi 

Geo. T. Johnson Co. xviii 

Arthur D. Jones vi 



PAGE 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co xiii 

Jordan Marsh Co v 

B. Kabatznick xx 

King Co xxi 

Henry S. Lombard ix 

A. D. Maclachlan xxii 

B. F. Macy viii 

McKenney & Waterbury Co viii 

Merrymount Press xiii 

Meyer Jonasson & Co xiii 

J. C. Miller, Jr xviii 

T. E. Moseley Co vii 

F. P. O'Connor Co xxi 

Old Corner Book Store xix 

Paine's News Corner ix 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Co x 

Otto J. Piehler, Inc xx 

S. S. Pierce Co xv 

Pinkhami & Smith i x 

Prior & Townsend, Inc ix 

F. M. Rogers & Co xvi 

Sample Shoe Shop Co xxii 

A. Shuman & Co xv 

E. T. Slattery Co xi 

Smith Brothers xvi 

Staples Coal Co xxii 

State Street Trust Co xvii 

Thayer McNeil Co xvi 

Thresher Brothers vi 

D. B. Updike xiii 

Ward's xv 

Watson & Rivinius x 

Weston-Thurston Co xviii 

D. Whiting & Sons xxii 

Woman's Educational and Industrial 

Union xix 



III 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



m 



^ 



(firr.'^i 



J^v- 



G)pccialtit uia^e/c Snap 

CUe JiaA?e at all tlme.A trie cAxaiceiX 
at patted plantd afia. cut jlaWe'id. 
Cut location id convenient., ou/i 
attendants cQit^teoaA and infelti- 
qefit;, and an? prices ate moderate. 

CAicunalitu ... o/aautu ... G)e*i\?i 
cJVQiialilaji-fjQ^nieii Ca. 

cXto/iiAtA 
49 J^emont c)t v cJjaAtan 

(ft tlu ffa^ StW 0iu*cJl 
CLPiipfion* SCaymaiJet 231 f ox 2312 



//fa 



^k» 




ASK FOR SIMMONS DISCOUNT 



IV 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



00 00 





Jordan Marsh 
Company 



NEW ENGLAND'S LARGEST AND MOST 
PROGRESSIVE RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT 



A Distinctively Good 
and Reliable Store 

— In the High Quality of its Merchandise 

— In the Carefulness of its Service 

— In its Steadfast Policy of Fair Dealing 



TWO GREAT BUILDINGS 

OVER 1,000,000 SQ. FT. OF FLOOR SPACE 

170 SEPARATE SELLING SECTIONS 



q 

00 00 

v 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Thresher Brothers 
66 The Silk Store 9 



44 AND 46 TEMPLE PLACE : 
SILKS 

RIBBONS 

BROADCLOTHS 



BOSTON, MASS. 



// it's Silk, 

you will find 

it at 

Thresher's 



Largest 

Importers and 
Distributers 
of Silks in 

New England 



WOOL DRESS GOODS 

WAISTS, PETTICOATS 
KIMONOS and 

MILLINERY 



PHILADELPHIA STORE: 1322 CHESTNUT STREET 



ARTHUR D. JONES 
Mason and Contractor 


Established 1841 

A. Hathaway Co. 

INCORPORATED 


Prompt Attention Given 
to Jobbing of All Kinds. 
Alterations to Buildings 
and Boiler Work Specialty 

76 Kingston Street, BOSTON 

TELEPHONES : 
2676 Oxford, and Home, 1165-4 Bellevue 


Carpenters and Builders 

82 Charles St. 
BOSTON 

Telephone Haymarket 1279 



VI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




Millinery for Spring 

2! » 11 1 ii ii . iflaim. 




Fine Footwear 

IN EVERY DESCRIPTION 

For Street and Dress Wear 



10% CASH DISCOUNT 

TO STUDENTS 



160 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON 



BEMIS & JEWETT 

Painting 

In all its Branches 

^>WALL PAPERS*^ 

Upholstery Work 

Stuffs for Coverings 
Draperies 

Holiday Novelties 

Favors for Luncheons, Dinners, 
Parties and Pop Concerts 



OFFICES AND SALESROOMS 
Newton Centre, Mass. Needham, Mass. 



DIEGES dc CLUST 

"// we made it it's right" 

Original designers and Makers of the 

OFFICIAL SCHOOL PIN 



Class Pins 

Fraternity Pins 

Class Rings 
Medals and Cups 

149 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



VII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



McKenney & Waterbury Co. 

Are Showing More Than 100 Styles In 

Desk Lamps anfcls 

The lamp illustrated may be hung on wall or side of 
bed. Finished in burnished brass, shade white enam- 
eled inside, 6-ft. silk cord, full chain, socket and plug. 

CALL OR SEND FOR CATALOGS 

181 Franklin Street c ^™ s f , 
BOSTON, MASS. 




PRICE 
#4.00 




WAISTS THAT FIT 

Both you and your purse. 

Ready-to-Wear GOWNS 

If they don't fit we make them fit. 

SILKS, CREPES and PONGEES 

With which to make your own Waists 
and Gowns if you prefer. 


Telephone, 3609 Back Bay 

B. F. MACY 

Formerly of F. A. WALKER BC CO. 

KITCHEN FURNISHINGS 

AND 

FIREPLACE FITTINGS 

410 Boylston St., (near Berkeley St.) 
BOSTON, MASS. 


If we get business from the Microcosm 
this year, 


Carman's Specialty Shoe Shop 

162 Tremont Street, BOSTON 


The Microcosm gets business from us 


The Exclusive Ladies Shoe Shop 


We trust that we may serve each other. 

WALTER M. HATCH & CO. 

148 TREMONT, AT WEST STREET 


Fashionable footwear for ladies of the 
most discriminating tastes will be found 
in our large stock. :: Satin evening slip- 
pers 40 different shades at $3.00 the pair, 
Hosiery to match at $1.00 the pair. 




BATCHELDER & SNYDER CO. 

PACKERS AND POULTRY DRESSERS 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sausages 
Poultry, Game, Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Olive Oils 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH AND NORTH CENTRE STS. 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Native Poultry Dressing Plant 
49 North Centre St., Boston 

Curing Plants, Boston and Chicago 



Sausage Factory and Smoke Houses 
Blackstone and North Sts. 



VIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Farquharson Candy Co. 

1366 Beacon Street. BROOKLINR. Coolidge Corner 

Our candies are made by and under the supervision 
of Mr. Wm. J. Farquharson, 12 years with Page 6C 
Shaw, and 14 years with Bailey's. 26 years a candy 
maker in West Street. 

No Better Candy Made 

Price, 40 cents the pound 



SODAS AND COLLEGE ICES 
Mail and Telephone Orders given prompt attention 



Lombard Specialties 



FOR 
THE 



College Girl 



MIDDY SUITS. BLOUSES 
SWEATERS. SKIRTS. &C. 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET 

HENRY S. LOMBARD 

22 Merchants Row 
BOSTON. MASS. 



_-f '■ ■'■■■ '" 



DinkhamMmiih 

Irecisiong/' (WJeryice 



"""" " ' v= 



SPECTACLES AND EYEGLASSES 

Opera 

Glasses 

A large stock of fine 
Lemaire Glasses at 
before-the-war prices. 

FINE PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS 





THE BEACON TAILORING CO. 

C. S. BURR, Proprietor. 1333 Beacon Street, Coolidge Corner, BROOKLINE 

Make a specialty of Remodeling, Cleansing and Pressing 
LADIES' GARMENTS 



QUICK SERVICE, REASONABLE PRICES. 



Telephone, Brookline 1743 



W. H. Prior 



M. O'Donnell 



E. H. Collupy 



Prior & Townsend, Inc. 



Wholesale Dealers in All Kinds of 



Sea Food fo r Ll 



Clubs, Hotels, Restau- 
Institutions and 
Steamships 



121-131 Faneuil Hall Market 

23 Administration Building, Boston Fish Pier 



Telephones, Richmond 136 

137 

Fort Hill 5707 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Remember ^kime 307 

FOR SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

Paine's News Corner 

256 Washington Street, BROOKLINE 

TOYMAN NEWSMAN BOOKMAN 

STATIONER PICTURE FRAMER ENGRAVER 

SUBSCRIPTIONS CIRCULATING LIBRARY 



Armstrong I ransfer 

Express Company 



PROMPT and RELIABLE SERVICE 

Baggage checked through to destination if you procure your 
railroad tickets in advance. :: Taxicab stands at North, South 
and Back Bay Stations. :: Telephone your orders to — 
Oxford 5380, or Brookline 3020 



Main Office, 

271 Albany St , Boston 



Brookline Office, 

1296 Beacon St., Brookline 



IX 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Dewick & Flanders 
INSURANCE 

100 MILK ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



Watson & Rivinius 
INSURANCE 

95 MILK ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF PHILADELPHIA 
A LEADING AMERICAN CORPORATION 

ORGANIZED IN 1825 (When John Quincy Adams was President of the United States) 
NEW ENGLAND DEPARTMENT (Six States), 137 Milk Street, Cor. Oliver Street, Boston, Mass. 
EDWARD C. BRUSH, Manager FRANK H. BATTILANA, Associate Manager 



CYRUS BREWER & CO. 

INSURANCE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



44 KILBY STREET BOSTON, MASS. 

The Employers' Liability Assurance Corporation 

(Limited) 

OF LONDON 

The Original and Leading Liability Insurance Company in the World 

Workmen's Compensation, Liability, Accident, 

Disability, Fidelity, Surety, Burglary, Plate Glass 

and Steam Boiler Insurance 

PROVIDING ABSOLUTE PROTECTION AND UNEQUALLED SERVICE 

SAMUEL APPLETON, United States Mgr. 132 Water Street, BOSTON 



FIELD 8c COWLES 
INSURANCE 

85 Water Street BOSTON, MASS. 



X 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



IE. 51 flatten} Qlnmpang 

OPPOSITE BOSTON COMMON 
154-155-156-158 Tremont Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

Smart Apparel for Young Women 

Fashions of distinctive individuality and 
charmingly youthful verve; adapted from 
the latest originalities of the recognized 
Paris style creators 

Gowns, Suits, Coats, Millinery, Blouses, 
Hosiery, Underwear, Boudoir Wear, etc. 

For College Wear, Sports, Afternoon and Evening Occasions 

Mail and special orders receive particular attention 




THIS TRADE MARK 
STANDS FOR QUALITY 




QIaustu- (SHafltn (ftnmpang 



PRINTERS OF 

The Microcosm 

PUBLISHERS 

Harvard Radcliffe 

Simmons 

PUBLICATIONS 
Text Books, Lodge and Society Reports 



Hjarttarfc Square :: :: fflamhrt&ge, Hasa. 



XI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




Beattie & McGuire 

(Famous for Silks and Dress Goods) 
IMPORTERS AND RETAILERS OF 

SILKS 

Dress Goods, Linens, Wash Dress Fabrics 
Silk Petticoats and Silk Waists 



also 



READY TO WEAR OR TO MEASURE 



Note — Students of Simmons College will be allowed 
by us a Special Discount of 10% on all merchandise 
except during our Semi-Annual Clearance Sales 



29 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON, MASS. 

Over Emerson's— TAKE ELEVATOR — Telephone 49 Oxford 





THE 


Compliments of the 


CHASE EXPRESS 


Cambridge Laundry 


COMPANY 




TELEPHONE 36 BROOKLINE 



XII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



MEYER JONASSON & CO. 

Tremont and Boylston Streets 



Suits, Coats, Gowns, Waists, Separate 

Skirts, Silk Petticoats, Sweaters, 

and Furs 

Special Department for Misses' Styles 




China and Glass 

The undersigned invite attention to their 
exhibits in this line, which include the best 
productions of the Potter's and Glass 
Maker's Art, gleaned by visits by our 
buyers to the best makers in Great Britain, 
France, Germany, Austria, Japan and 
America. 



Dinner Set Department 


3d Floor 


Glassware Department 


2d Floor 


Stock Pattern Department 


4th Floor 


Lamp Department 


Gallery 


Art Pottery, Wedding Gifts 


3d Floor 


Toilet Sets, Plant Pots, etc. 


Gallery 


Kitchen and Cooking Ware Dept. 


4th Floor 


Visitors will find an extensive 


line of 


Students' Requisites 




JONES, McDUFFEE & 



STRATTON CO, 



Ten Floors. Wholesale and Retail 



33 Franklin Street 



Boston 



Near Washington and Summer Streets 



gX&Kk 




D. B. UPDIKE 

€&e aperrpmount Press 

232 SUMMER ST. 
BOSTON 

PRINTER OF THE SIMMONS COLLEGE 

BULLETIN, & THE PUBLICATIONS OF 

OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF LEARNING 

fefc. &fc. £sfc. 

Officers and Students of Simmons College 

are invited to 'visit the Press, opposite the 

South Station. Boston 



XIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



161 TREMONT STREET 164 TREMONT STREET 

Telephone Oxford 858 Telephone Oxford 2687 



*«=-- 




BOSTON* 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



CLASS 
PHOTOGRAPHER 



ARTISTIC 
PORTRAITURE 



PICTURE FRAMES FOR SALE IN OUR STUDIOS 



XIV 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




Hats that are "Different" 

Correctly Fitted 
Special Rates to College Girls 

Fannette Millinery Shop 

7 TEMPLE PLACE :: :: BOSTON, MASS. 



"CHOISA" 

Ceylon Tea 



1 lb. 
Canisters 
60 cents 

1-2 lb. 

Canisters 
35 cents 




Packed in Parchment-lined 
One-pound and half-pound Canisters 

We invite comparison with other 
Teas of the same or higher price 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 



BOSTON 



BROOKLINE 



A. Shuman & Co. 

THE SERVICE STORE 



Distinctive 
Apparel 

Man-tailored from Men's Fabrics 
For College Girls 

SHUMAN CORNER, BOSTON 



Real Ladies' Tailoring 
A. AXELSON 

4 Francis Street, Roxbury 

These are three reasons why one should have 
a suit made at Axelson's : — First, Style; Second, 
Best workmanship ; and Third, Lowest prices 

One trial will convince you. 
Telephone Brookline 1782"W 




STATIONERS 



Fine Stationery 
High Grade 
Engraving 

Wedding and Class Day Invitations, Reception and Visiting 
Cards, Society and Frat Stationery, Monogram and 
Address Dies, Menus, Programs and Dance Orders. 

Authoritative and Distinctive Stationery for all occasions, 
with the "Quality Look." 

Office Equipment, Students' Stationery Supplies, Leather 
Goods and Brass Desk Fittings. 

57 - 61 Franklin Street, BOSTON, MASS. 



XV 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




Plastic Footwear 



REG. U. S. PATENT OFFICE 1912 

Is especially effective when relief is needed from the strain and 
ache resulting from walking or standing in illfitting shoes 

STYLES 

BOOTS — SHOES — PUMPS 

THAYER McNEIL COMPANY 

47 TEMPLE PLACE - - 15 WEST STREET 



Cobb, Bates & Yerxa Co. 



are thoroughly equipped to supply 
Colleges, Schools, Institutions and all 
large users of the best quality of 
groceries from their wholesale store at 



222 SUMMER STREET 

(OPPOSITE SOUTH STATION) 



F. M. Rogers & Co. 
Painters and Decorators 

27 to 31 Province Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Members of Master Builders' Association 



Albert P. Smith 



Telephone, Richmond 1647 



SMITH BROTHERS 
Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
and Basement No. 3 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Creamery 



XVI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




Cox Sons & Vining 

72 Madison Avenue, New York 
MAKERS OF 

CAPS 

AND 

GOWNS 

Simmons 1916 Class Contract 

Correct Hoods for all Degrees 

Choir Vestments 



Compliments of the State Street Trust Company 



MAIN OFFICE, 33 STATE STREET 



Branch Office, Corner Massachusetts Avenue and Boylston Street 



XVII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Why pay the Doctor? 



Plenty of GOOD FOOD and FRESH AIR costs 
less and is far more satisfactory. You can get both 
by doing your own MARKETING and buying of 

Weston-Thurston Co. 

Beef, Veal, Lamb, Pork, Poultry, Butter, Cheese, Eggs 

Stalls 20, 22 and 24, New Faneuil Hall Market 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Richmond 540 



TWO TELEPHONES 



Richmond 521 



gmmh BOSTON oval 


J. G. MILLER, JR. 


Jq~®EfSf^ TOILET PAPER 




L w ttr^tb ^ e have prepared a Home Combina- 
1 [Jr«feJr l ' on con sisting of one handsomely niclc- 
llfC* elled BOSTUN OVAL Fixture (value 
lUTl 75c.) and three rolls BOSTON OVAL 

r v Vp'M Paper (value 30c,) ' 


Printer 


V \\ uT Combination Retails for 25c. 

\ fl'i| --VwX \ ^ s ' c y° ur Dealer for 

V '. V xf 'I THE BOSTON OVAL HOME COMBINATION 


5 AND 7 LAURIAT PLACE 


MEDFORD, MASS. 


X The Geo. T. Johnson Co. 




Lr-" BOSTON. MASS. 


Telephone. Medford 780 


Hayden costume Go. 




Costumes for the Professional 


Otto Gunther's Sons 


and Amateur Stage, Operas, 




Carnivals, Masquerades, SCc. 


Wholesale Confectioners 


243 Tremont St. :: :: (near Eliot St.) 


ROSLINDALE, MASS. 


BOSTON, MASS. 




Telephone, Oxford 3145 





XVIII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




HAND MACHINES 
FROM $7 UP 




NEW HOME 

CHAIN STITCH 

AUTOMATIC 




NEW HOME 

ROUND ROBIN 

ROTARY 



GET A 



NEW HOME 
Sewing Machine 



"The Machine of Durability and Dependability" 
The Guarantee Never Runs Out 



MADE IN NEW ENGLAND 
Factory at Orange, Mass. 

Superior to all others in Quality and 
Simplicity. Sews where others fail. Its 
patented Double Feed sews thin or thick 
goods with equal precision. 

Adopted by Boston, Milton, Newton, Quincy, 

Wellesley and other leading New England 

cities and towns for school use 

The NFW HOMR MACHINE is sold strictly 

on its merits. No Club Schemes or Door- to- Door 

Canvassers Employed. 

Cash or Sold on Easy Payments 



$2 -00 Down | $1 .00 a Week 

No Interest Charged. Free instruction at 
Your Home. 



Your old machine taken in exchange as 

First Payment 

New Sewing Machines Rented 

All Makes Repaired 

Parts, Needles and Oil for All Machines 




NEW HOME 
PARLOR CABINET 







NEW HOME 

LONG SHUTTLE 

VIBRATOR 



G. W. BOWLES & CO. 

37 BEDFORD STREET 



Opposite Jordan Maish 
Furniture Annex 



General Agent 



1352 Ox. 
lei. 



Women's Educational and Industrial Union 
264 Boylston Street, Boston 

LUNCHEON AND SUPPER 
ROOMS = 

LUNCHEON, 11 to 3 

AFTERNOON TEA, 3:30 to 5:30 

SUPPER, 5:30 to 7:30 

Highest quality of food, daintily served. 
Approved Lunch Rooms for Simmons College girls. 



The Old Corner Book 
Store, Inc. 

Standard and New Books, Medical and 
Scientific Books, Prayer Books and Hymnals 

Subscriptions received for all English and 
American periodicals 

27 and 29 BROMFIELD STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone: 7069 or 7070 Main 



XIX 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Mb JHJP01 



assTSpVLffTon -Street 
go5TO|s 



SUITS-COATS-GOWNS 

By specializing in garments of style and quality at moderate prices, 
Chandler &£ Co. offer splendid values in apparel for young ladies 
and misses. Rugs, draperies, curtains and linens are of the same 
high quality, and at equally low prices. 



OIljattMfr & (Ha. 



Sfrrtnout S'trrrt 
<8ri0tnit 



THE CROSSETT 
= SHOE = 



"Makes Life's Walk Easy" 

ORTHOPEDIC SHOES A SPECIALTY 
For Men For Women 

$4.SO to $7.00 $3.50 to $7.00 

1 66 Tremont Street, BOSTON. MASS. 



Visit Kabatznick's 
Art Shop 


John W. Gosden & Co. 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters 
Electricians and Locksmiths 


TF you want FRAMING that is artistic, 
X IMPORTED PICTURES that are nov- 


Dealers in Hardware and Cutlery, 

Kitchen-Ware, Paints, Oils 

and Varnishes 


and HAND CARVED FRAMES of rare 
beauty, at prices that will please you. 


Tel. Back Bay 730 246 Massachusetts Ave. 


OIL PAINTINGS WATER COLORS 

PASTELS ETCHINGS 

HAND CARVED FRAMES 

FRENCH MIRRORS 

NOVELTIES FROM EUROPEAN 

ART CENTRES 


The Fisk Teachers' Agency 

2A PARK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

New York, 156 Fifth Avenue 
Washington, 1847 U Street 
Chicago, 28 East Jackson Boulevard 


B. KABATZNICK 

484 Boylston Street Boston, Mass. 

TELEPHONE, BACK BAY 4749 


Portland, Ore. 514 Journal Building 
Berkeley, Cal. 2161 Shattuck Avenue 
Los Angeles, 343 Douglas Building 

SEND TO ANY ADDRESS ABOVE FOR 
AGENCY MANUAL AND REGISTRA- 
TION FORMS, FREE 



XX 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



The unusual in 

styles, values, service 

— Boston's leading specialty shop for 
Women's and Misses' Quality Apparel 



3. f. (rOtomtor <£*. 

157 Tremont Street, Boston 





Telephone Richmond 2984-85 Near North Station 


Compliments of the 


THE KING COMPANY 


Independent Ice Co. 


Engravers and Electrotypers 


171 Second Street 




Cambridge, Mass. 


251 Causeway Street 




BOSTON MASS. 



XXI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Simmons Souvenirs 

When in need of College Souvenirs, 

look over our line, comprising the 

following : 



Pennants 

Banners 

Pillows 




Gold and 

Silver Pins 

Hat Pins 

Stationery 



Special orders for 

PILLOWS, BANNERS OR 

PENNANTS 

will be given our careful attention 

A. D. Maclachlan 

502 Boylston St-, Boston 



THIS LABEL 

GUARANTEES QUALITY 




D. Whiting & Sons 

BOSTON 



The Sample Shoe Shop 
Company 

Situated as we are, in an up- 
stairs location, we are enabled to 
give you unrivaled opportunities 
to get high-grade shoes at low 
prices. 

We will, as usual, continue to 
give students the discount. 

496 Washington Street, Boston 

Corner Bedford — Take elevator — over Riker-Jaynes 



Compliments of 

Staples Coal Company 
of Boston 

40 Central Street, Boston 



XXII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




Dorothy's Getting Well. 

Dorothy, who is just getting over the measles, has no more than said, 'My Good- 
ness ! Why don't they give me something good to eat?" when the wise Kewpies 
appear, one bearing a dish of delicious, sparkling Raspberry 




another bringing a spoon, and one carrying from sight the hateful 
medicine. 

Dorothy's happy face expresses her approval. 

"America's Most Famous Dessert" is good in the sick-room as 
in the dining room, for the delightful pure fruit flavors of Jell-O 
appeal to all appetites. There are seven of the flavors : Raspberry, 
Strawberry, Lemon, Orange, Cherry, Peach, Chocolate. At all 
grocers' and general storekeepers', 10 cents each. 

A tightly sealed waxed paper bag, proof against moisture and 
air, encloses the Jell-O in each package. 

A beautiful new Jell-O Book telling of a young bride's house- 
keeping experiences has just been issued. It has splendid pictures 
in colors and will interest every woman. It will be sent to you free 
if you will send us your name and address. 

THE GENESEE PURE FOOD CO., Le Roy, N. Y., and Bridgeburg, Ont. 




This is the package 



XXIII 



NOt